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Today's Events [More]

Randolph Street Markets Chicago (IL)
Celebrating the Fiber Arts: The Helen Geier Flynt Textile Gallery (MA)
Engraved Powder Horns from the French and Indian War and the American Revolution: The William H. Guthman Collection (MA)
Importing Splendor: Luxuries from China (MA)
Into the Woods: Crafting Early American Furniture (MA)
Raven's Many Gifts: Native Art of the Northwest Coast (MA)
Why We Collect: Recent Acquisitions at Historic Deerfield, 2010-2017 (MA)
Fall Seminar (NC)
"Saratoga: Burgoyne's Retreat and Surrender" Bus Tour (NY)
Fourteenth Annual Fort Ticonderoga Seminar on the American Revolution (NY)
The Last Argument of Kings: The Art and Science of 18th-century Artillery (NY)
The Original 169th Semi-Annual York Antiques Show and Sale (PA)
Unraveling the Threads of History (PA)
Cole's Antiques and Collectibles Show (TX)
LaBahia Antiques Show and Sale (TX)
A Rich and Varied Culture: The Material World of the Early South (VA)
America's Folk Art (VA)
American Furniture: From Virginia to Vermont (VA)
Architectural Clues to 18th-Century Williamsburg (VA)
Changing Keys: Keyboard Instruments for America, 1700–1830 (VA)
China of the Most Fashionable Sort: Chinese Export Porcelain in Colonial America (VA)
Color and Shape: The Art of the American Theorem (VA)
From Forge and Furnace: A Celebration of Early American Iron (VA)
German Toys in America (VA)
Lock, Stock, and Barrel (VA)
Revolution in Taste (VA)
Silver from Mine to Masterpiece (VA)
The World Made Small (VA)
We the People: American Folk Portraits (VA)

Featured Citizen [More]

August Ferdinand Mobius
a German mathematician and theoretical astronomer. He is best known for his discovery of the Möbius strip, a non-orientable two-dimensional surface with only one side when embedded in three-dimensional Euclidean space. Many mathematical concepts are named after him, including the Möbius plane, the Möbius transformations, important in projective geometry, and the Möbius transform of number theory.

Word of the Day [More]

Kittle
To tickle; hence, to excite, rouse (usually pleasantly) ; to puzzle with a riddle (tickle one's curiosity) ; also, to 'tickle' the fiddle and the like. This was a common word from the 10th century, and is still used in Scotland. Also kickle. Hence, as an adjective, kittle, ticklish, hard to handle, risky (a 'ticklish' situation) , delicate. TRUTH for I 1 September, 1890, said: Cleopatra is a kittle character for a London theatre, unless played by some French actress who has no character to lose.

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Daily Colonial Quote

More notable sayings can be found in the Colonial Quotes section
I was bold in the pursuit of knowledge, never fearing to follow truth and reason to whatever results they led, and bearding every authority which stood in their way.
— Thomas Jefferson

Latest Activity

Today7 Census People added/edited
8 Census Links added/edited
5 Timeline and/or Link entries added/edited
09/21/1770 Census People added/edited
70 Census Links added/edited
1 Dictionary word added/edited
3 Quotes added
3 Timeline and/or Link entries added/edited
09/20/171 Article Chapter added/edited
5223 Census People added/edited
22 Census Links added/edited
6 Dictionary words added/edited
7 Timeline and/or Link entries added/edited
09/19/171 Broadsheet added
5 Census People added/edited
15 Census Links added/edited
1 Timeline and/or Link entry added/edited
09/18/171 Broadsheet added
20 Calendar Events added/edited
18 Census Links added/edited
3 Timeline and/or Link entries added/edited

Recent Articles on Colonial Sense

WhatWhereWhen
New England Weather: The Gale of 1815
Society-Lifestyle: Signs of the Times09/20/17
August, 2017
Antiques: Auction Results09/04/17
The White Pine Series: Connecticut
Architecture: Houses08/28/17
The White Pine Series: New York
Architecture: Houses08/28/17
New England Weather: The Meteor of 1787
Society-Lifestyle: Signs of the Times08/17/17
July, 2017
Antiques: Auction Results08/06/17
New England Weather: The Cyclone of 1787
Society-Lifestyle: Signs of the Times07/25/17
An Account Of Two Voyages: Chapter 2
Regional History: Journals07/16/17
June, 2017
Antiques: Auction Results07/07/17
Travels in the American Colonies: Colonel Chicken's Journal To The Cherokees
Regional History: Journals06/19/17

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This Day in Early Modern History -- September 22nd

click on      for links for date verification; or go to the Timeline for more events

Events

 •  1504-A settled engagement is arranged between Karel of Luxembourg and Claudia the Beaujeu. 
  -Treaty of Blois: Philip I of Castile, Maximilian I and Louis XII agree to terms.
 •  1529-Cardinal Thomas Wolsey lays-off English Lord Chancellor 
 •  1554-Francisco Vasquez de Coronado dies without finding the fabled cities of gold
 •  1586-Battle of Zutphen: English vs Dutch army
 •  1598-Playwright Ben Jonson is indicted for manslaughter
 •  1656-All female jury hears case of Judith Catchpole who is accused of witchcraft and killing her child (and acquits her)
 •  1665- Moliere's L'Amour médecin premieres in Paris
 •  1692-Last eight people hanged for witchcraft in America, at Salem, MA
 •  1699-People of Rotterdam strike over high cost of butter 
 •  1711-French troops occupy Rio de Janeiro 
 •  1733-Polish King Stanislaw Leszczynski flees to Danzig 
 •  1735-Robert Walpole is first British Prime Minister to live at 10 Downing Street
 •  1745-Charles Edward Stuart (aka Bonnie Prince Charlie)'s army returns to Edinburgh 
 •  1753-Pangeran Gusti installed as sultan of Banten 
 •  1756-Nassau Hall opens at Princeton University 
 •  1776-Patriot Nathan Hale executed for spying
 •  1784-Russian trappers establish a colony on Kodiak Island, Alaska 
 •  1789-Office of Postmaster General is created under the Treasury Department 
 •  1791-Michael Faraday (of electricity & magnetism fame) is born in England
 •  1792-Origin of French Republican Era
 •  1817-John Quincy Adams becomes eighth Secretary of State
 •  1828-Shaka Zulu assassinated
 •  1857-Russian warship Lefort disappears in Finland Gulf in storm -- 826 die

Births

 •  1515-   Anne of Cleves -- Governance
 •  1552-   Vasili IV -- Governance
 •  1606-  Li Zicheng -- MilitaryGovernance
 •  1711-  Thomas Wright -- Astronomers
 •  1737-  John Pickering -- Governance
 •  1791-  Michael Faraday -- InventorsScientists
 •  1811-  Michal Miloslav Hodza -- Writers
 •  1816-  Charles Leickert -- Artists

Deaths

 •  1520-   Selim I -- ClergyGovernance
 •  1607-  Alessandro Allori -- Artists
 •  1626-  Aodh Mac Cathmhaoil -- ClergyWriters
 •  1637-  Charles Gonzaga -- Governance
 •  1660-  Pieter de Ring -- Artists
 •  1688-  Francois Bernier -- WritersPhysicians
 •  1737-  Michel Pignolet de Monteclair -- Composers
 •  1774-   Clement XIV -- Clergy
 •  1778-  Nathan Hale -- Military
 •  1836-  Stefan Stratimirovic -- Clergy
 •  1848-  James Dunlop -- Astronomers

Latest Broadsheets -- Daily news from around the world about the Early Modern Era

Older articles can be found in the Broadsheet Archive
posted on Colonial Sense: 09/19/2017
Rare Alexander Hamilton Letters Made Public for First Time
August 28, 2017, Time by Olivia B. Waxman
To answer the question posed by the musical Hamilton — how did a "bastard, orphan, son of a whore and a Scotsman" become one of the Founding Fathers of the United States? — you don't need to score a ticket to the hit show.

Thanks to a new project at the Library of Congress, it just became easier to figure it out online.

posted on Colonial Sense: 09/18/2017
North Africa and the Birth of the U.S. Navy
August 23, 2017, AllAfrica by David S. Bloom
Many people already know that Morocco was the first country to recognize the United States, on December 20, 1777, while it was still in the throes of the revolutionary war. Less well known is the fact that this act of recognition was but a small chapter in the long and complicated story of one of America's first global entanglements-which ultimately led to the birth of the US Navy. As the fledgling United States tried to cope with complicated relations with the European powers, it also had to contend with Mediterranean pirates from Africa's northern coast as it attempted to emerge as a prominent global trader--a conflict that eventually led to the Barbary wars.

posted on Colonial Sense: 09/16/2017
Christopher Columbus monument vandalized in Baltimore
August 21, 2017, The Baltimore Sun by Pamela Wood
A monument in Baltimore to Christopher Columbus — believed to be the first one erected to the Italian explorer in America — was vandalized.

Baltimore Police said they were looking into the incident, but couldn’t say when the damage took place.

A video posted to YouTube on Monday by a user named “Popular Resistance” shows a man striking the base of the monument near Herring Run Park repeatedly with a sledgehammer. Another person holds a sign that reads: “Racism, tear it down.” Another sign is taped to the monument reading: “The future is racial and economic justice.”

posted on Colonial Sense: 09/15/2017
Christopher Columbus Was a Murderous Moron
August 16, 2017, YouTube by College Humor
[VIDEO] Turns out Christopher Columbus wasn't brave, he was just really bad at math.

posted on Colonial Sense: 09/14/2017 -- Followup
Luna Site Confirmed As Largest Mid-16th Century Spanish Settlement In The Southeast
August 06, 2017, NPR by Sandra Averhart
University of West Florida archaeology students and researchers have spent the summer uncovering more details about the 1559 Luna Settlement.

The Tristan de Luna Settlement overlooking Pensacola Bay existed for just two years until 1561.

After its discovery in the fall of 2015, one of the primary goals of UWF researchers was to determine the spatial extent of the site. Now, after two summer field schools - conducted by the UWF Archaeology Institute - and over 900 shovel tests, they have a good idea.

posted on Colonial Sense: 09/13/2017
Physicists shed light on rarely seen 16th-century metal-working technique
August 04, 2017, Phys.org by Hayley Dunning
Imperial researchers have tested a 'blued' gauntlet from a 16th-century suit of armour with a method usually used to study solar panels.

Metalworkers have used various techniques to prevent steel from rusting, some of which turn the metal black-blue. This 'blueing' effect can be created in several different ways, including by applying heat or (in later years) chemicals.

posted on Colonial Sense: 09/12/2017
Losing millions of dollars, Colonial Williamsburg makes ‘difficult decisions’
June 30, 2017, WTVR (VA) by Scott Wise
The President and CEO of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation announced "difficult decisions" were made in an effort to keep the historic tourist attraction up and running. In addition to cutting budgets in all departments, Colonial Williamsburg will begin outsourcing jobs it once handled itself. "The Foundation will be outsourcing our golf operations, our retail stores, much of our maintenance and facilities operations, and our commercial real estate management. As we've entered into these outsourcing agreements, our primary consideration was that our employees be treated fairly and respectfully," Mitchell B. Reiss wrote in an open letter to the Colonial Williamsburg Community.

"After a series of tough negotiations, we have required each vendor to retain every employee in these four areas for at least one year. If employees in these four areas decide to join their new employer or if they decline to do so, they will receive a generous severance payment from the Foundation."

posted on Colonial Sense: 09/11/2017
The story of St. Louis’ beginnings becomes more complicated with new archaeological findings
June 08, 2017, St. Louis Public Radio by Alex Heuer
Archaeologists from the Missouri Department of Transportation believe they have found artifacts and evidence of permanent residences in St. Louis prior to 1764, when the city became a permanent trading post along the Mississippi River.

The discoveries and inferences that archaeologists can derive from them add nuance to the complex story of how St. Louis became an important commerce center in the 18th century – more than a decade prior to United States’ independence and nearly 40 years before the country acquired St. Louis through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

posted on Colonial Sense: 09/10/2017
Family Reunion at NY Home Damaged During Revolutionary War
August 05, 2017, The Associated Press by Staff
Members of one family whose ancestors owned a New York home damaged during a Revolutionary War battle are gathering at the upstate property for a reunion. More than 40 members of the Marshall family are attending the reunion this weekend at the Marshall House in the village of Schuylerville, on the Hudson River 30 miles (48 kilometers) north of Albany.

posted on Colonial Sense: 09/09/2017
The Man Who Picked Victorian London's Unpickable Lock
August 03, 2017, Mental Floss by Jake Rossen
“Look on my works, ye burglars, and despair.” These were the words used to describe the locks of Jeremiah Chubb, an iron worker in 19th-century London who was renowned for his Detector, a security lock that was thought to be virtually impregnable. The prying tips of picking tools would trigger the bolt in such a way that even the conventional key would no longer be able to open it. Upon trying—and failing—to open the lock, the owner would realize it had been tampered with (the lock could then be opened, originally by using a "regulator key," and later by turning the "true key" counterclockwise to reset it).


Colonial Sense Stats

Event Calendar Listings: 286Online Resources Links: 612Recipes: 481
Census People: 10,546 | Pix: 4,649 (44.08%) | Countries: 9,779 (92.73%) | Dates: 3,059 (29.01%) | Bio: 9,409 (89.22%) | TLs: 1,170 (11.09%)/3,443 (44.62%) | Links: 9,801 (92.94%) | Gallery: 52 (0.49%) | Notes: 1,557 (14.76%)
Architecture: Fortifications: 59 | Pix: 2 (3.39%) | Countries: 59 (100.00%) | Dates: 0 (0.00%) | Bio: 59 (100.00%) | TLs: 2 (3.39%)/8 | Links: 61 (103.39%) | Gallery: 61 (103.39%) | Notes: 61 (103.39%)
Dictionary Entries: 1,406Broadsheet Archive: 2,754Food and Farming Items: 200
Timeline Events: 7,716    Tagged: 6,328 (82.01%)   With Links: 4,214 (54.61%)   Total Links: 5,236
Colonial Quotes: 1,900Trivia Challenge: 293Videos: 93
Downloads:   Articles: 9  Music: 12  Wallpaper: 6  Radio Shows: 5

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