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SEVRES COBALT & GOLD ENAMELED TUREEN FROM THE 'SERVICE ICONOGRAPHIQUE'. C. 1812. Sgn. With double eagle heads. Sevres mark and 1812 printed in red; gold script, 2juin BT. Green numerals, 13.cv.12. Ht. 9.5" W 12". Descended in the family of William Weightman. The tureen was used in his house in Mt. Airy, outside Philadelphia where he entertained lavishly. After his death, that house, Raven Hill, was given to the catholic church. They converted it into a girl's school.

Provenance: The china has been in the family for over 100 years, thence by descent.The collection of the Comtesse de Nadaillac (?)James B. Pooley, Philadelphia, 1888The collection of William Weightman, "Ravenhill", Germantown, PhiladelphiaBy direct descent to the present owner

Condition: Minor fleck to rim of lid.

Sold at Cottone Auctions February 21, 2015.

Estimate: $5,000-8,000

Price Realized: $52,500 (does not include buyers premium)


FINE & RARE 18K GOLD PRESENTATION BOX, Lafayette box purportedly given by Louis XVI to Marquis de Lafayette. Miniature, celebrating the May Feast at Versailles Opera Theater. Retail by Charles-Raymond Granchez "Au Petit Dunkerque." Paris, C. 1778. Ht. .875" W 3.52" D 1.5". 78.7 dwt. Descended in the family of Count de Linares, son of Queen Maria Luisa to the current owner.

Sold at Cottone Auctions February 21, 2015.

Estimate: $10,000-15,000

Price Realized: $17,500 (does not include buyers premium)


GEORGE III CARVED & GILD WOOD MIRROR, 18th cent. Eagle heads & beveled glass. Ht. 46" W 26".

Sold at Cottone Auctions February 21, 2015.

Estimate: $1,000-2,500

Price Realized: $4,750 (does not include buyers premium)


QUEEN ANNE, PENNSYLVANIA, TEA TABLE, Figured mahogany; birdcage & dish top; pad feet. Ht. 28.5" Dia. 24". Ex. Collection of Walter Vogel, Rochester, NY.

Sold at Cottone Auctions February 21, 2015.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $5,500 (does not include buyers premium)


RARE INLAID MINIATURE CHEST, NEW YORK OR PENNSYLVANIA, Mahogany & cherry. Turned columns & claw feet. Inlaid sunburst & fan backsplash. Max. Ht. 20.5" W 16" D 12". Ex. Collection of Walter Vogel, Rochester, NY.

Condition: Original sandwich glass pulls. Loss & wear to paw feet, some veneer loss.

Sold at Cottone Auctions February 21, 2015.

Estimate: $1,000-1,500

Price Realized: $4,250 (does not include buyers premium)


MASSACHUSETTS, CHIPPENDALE BLOCK FRONT CHEST ON CHEST, 18TH CENTURY, mahogany. Ogee base, fan carved drawer. Ht. 6' 11" W 42" D 22". From the Davenport Family, NY.

Condition: Restorations to the bottom 3" of feet.

Sold at Cottone Auctions February 21, 2015.

Estimate: $5,000-8,000

Price Realized: $16,500 (does not include buyers premium)


NEW ENGLAND DIMINUTIVE CHIPPENDALE BLOCK FRONT KNEE HOLE DESK, 18TH CENTURY, mahogany. Ht. 31" Case W 32 1/2" D 20". From the Davenport Family, NY.

Sold at Cottone Auctions February 21, 2015.

Estimate: $4,000-6,000

Price Realized: $12,500 (does not include buyers premium)


NEW ENGLAND QUEEN ANNE TRAY TOP TEA TABLE, 18TH CENTURY, mahogany. Scalloped skirt, pad feet. Ht. 27" W 30.5" D 19". Ex. Collection of Walter Vogel, Rochester, NY.

Sold at Cottone Auctions February 21, 2015.

Estimate: $1,500-2,500

Price Realized: $255,000 (does not include buyers premium)


REVOLUTIONARY WAR ERA POWDER HORN, Inscribed: Liev Bennedick, Satterlee His Horn, fort Eadward, October, L 12.5".

Sold at Cottone Auctions February 21, 2015.

Estimate: $1,500-2,500

Price Realized: $9,250 (does not include buyers premium)


PAINTED DIMINUTIVE BLANKET BOX, C. 1824. Hand painted church with flowers, mariner's compass. Dovetailed. Ht. 11" W 21" D 15".

Sold at Cottone Auctions February 21, 2015.

Estimate: $1,500-2,500

Price Realized: $9,250 (does not include buyers premium)


SMOKE DECORATED BLANKET CHEST, A 19th century Pennsylvania softwood smoke-decorated diminutive blanket chest. The form consisting of a six board softwood chest resting on simple bracket feet with an applied mid-molding. The interior with a till (with unusual applied reeding) and a later fitted wooden tray (probably to hold silver or linens in the 20th century). The exterior decoration consisting of a yellow ground with smoke decoration.

PROVENANCE: By descent to the consignor through Sarah (Sallie) Riegel (1845-). She married Charles G. Loose (1845-1923) of Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. Per family history, he was the head of the medical department at Reading Hospital and his family members owned and operated the Cumberland Valley Institute circa 1853-1858. Sarah was a relative of John Adam Riegel, a burgess of Mechanicsburg and owner of a dry goods store there. Sarah and Charles’ daughter Katherine Riegel Loose (1877-1961) was an author of Pennsylvania German books and articles written under the pseudonym Georg Schock (Schock was a family name on her mother’s side)

Measurements: 28.5" x 15" x 19" high.

Condition: Wear consistent with age.

Sold at Cordier Auctions February 15, 2015.

Estimate: $500-700

Price Realized: $3,000 (does not include buyers premium)


GREEN & RED SPATTER CUP & SAUCER, ca. 1850, earthenware handleless cup with green bulls-eye centered with red and a saucer with a green bulls-eye, 4"d, 2.625"h cup, 5.75"d, 1.375"h saucer.

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $100-300

Price Realized: $400


BLACK & PURPLE RAINBOW SPATTER CUP & SAUCER, ca. 1850, earthenware handleless cup and saucer with black bulls-eye centered with purple, 3.875"d, 2.625"h cup, 5.75"d, 1.125"h.

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $100-300

Price Realized: $450


HAND-DRAWN FRAKTUR TAUFSCHEIN, ca. 1800, attributed to the "Blowsy Angel Artist", with angels, birds and floral motifs surrounding a central text recording the 1800 birth of Johan Leonard Meyer in Macungie Twp., Northampton Co. in a paint-decorated frame, 16"x 13" sight; 21.25"x 18.125".

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $1,550


RARE HAND-DRAWN FRAKTUR MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE, ca. 1810, with encircled text surrounded by tulips, hearts and vines recording the 1810 marriage of Georg Hoffer and Elisabeth Gilbert of Schuylkill Co., PA finely executed in ink and watercolor on laid paper mounted in a painted frame, 13"x 8" sight; 15"x 10.125" framed.

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $900-1,200

Price Realized: $1,400


BOOK WINDER, ca. 1820-60, having two handled spools mounted to whittled posts and fitted with printed verse that scrolls onto the rollers retaining the original red painted surface, 11"x 4.5"x 6.5".

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $100-300

Price Realized: $210


EAGLE BUTTER PRINT, ca. 1820-60, a very folksy rendition having a serrated border, 4.625"x 2.75".

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $200-400

Price Realized: $600


PENNSYLVANIA SLIPWARE PIE DISH, ca. 1850, lead glazed dish with coggled rim, trailed three line yellow slip decorations of four corn plant motifs and central design of an undulating line, 9"d, 1.5"h.

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $100-300

Price Realized: $675


PENNSYLVANIA SLIPWARE LOAF DISH, ca. 1850, trailed yellow four line slip on an orangey lead glazed ground with central motif of undulating lines surrounded by four crossed elongated sigmas bracketing two corn plant motifs, 2.75"x 10"x 13.625".

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $300-600

Price Realized: $1,500


UNCLE SAM COOKIE CUTTER, ca. 1840-75, exceptional flat-backed example having a top hat, ruffled shirt and coat tails in tin with spot soldering, 3.125"x 12.75"x .75".

Provenance: ex-Earl and Ada Robacker Collection

Horst Auctioneers, Session 1, 1989, lot 383 with catalog accompanying

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $400-800

Price Realized: $2,150


CONESTOGA WAGON JACK, ca. 1796, wrought iron with an oak case and punch decorated shaft dated "1796", 6"x 7"x 22.5".

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $100-300

Price Realized: $450


6 CONESTOGA STAY CHAINS, ca. 1780-1850, hand-forged with five having triple links and one with single links, 19" shortest; 37" longest.

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $50-200

Price Realized: $120


PAIR OF RAM'S HORN HINGES, ca. 1750-1825, elaborately wrought with bird’s head terminuses and engraved designs, 20.25"x 7.5"x 1".

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14, 2015.

Estimate: $100-300

Price Realized: $4,100


1852 CONESTOGA WAGON JACK, ca. 1852, wrought iron with an oak case having the decorated iron shaft marked "PN 1852" attributed to Peter Nagle working in Lancaster City and marked "CHH" on side, 7"x 8 3/4"x 21.5".

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14,2015.

Estimate: $50-200

Price Realized: $500


INLAID PENNSYLVANIA HIGHT CHEST, ca. 1795-1815, walnut and poplar chest having plain quarter columns, French feet, three over four thumbnail molded drawers with line and fan inlays and bands of contrasting diamonds at the top and bottom of the case fitted with oval brasses likely of Berks Co. origin, 44"x 22.75"x 54.5".

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14,2015.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $3,400


PAINT DECORATED DUTCH CUPBOARD, ca. 1825-50, softwood two-piece cupboard with the upper case having two six-lite smoke decorated doors, plate rails and spoon racks and a cove-molded cornice and the base having two drawers over two recessed panel doors with beveled edges supported on turned feet and retaining the original ochre feather graining and an untouched surface, 53"x 17.75"x 87.5".

Sold at Horst Auctions February 13-14,2015.

Estimate: $15,000-22,000

Price Realized: $17,000


MAINE BIRDS EYE MAPLE CHEST, Nineteenth Century American birds eye maple three over three chest, Circa 1840. Height 43.5, width 45, depth 19.5. Veneer chips and imperfections.

Sold at Carl W. Stinson Auctions February 21,2015.

Estimate: $200-400

Price Realized: $1,400 (does not include buyers premium)


LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA SACK-BACK WINDSOR ARMCHAIR, signed "M. Stoner". 36"h.x26"w.x22"d., seat 15.5".

Sold at Weiderseim Auctions February 14, 2015.

Estimate: $300-400

Price Realized: $1,100 (does not include buyers premium)


GREEN PAINTED DOME LID STORAGE BOX, c.1830, with original paint decoration. 10"h.x21"w.x10.5"d.

Sold at Weiderseim Auctions February 14, 2015.

Estimate: $200-300

Price Realized: $1,400 (does not include buyers premium)


ENGLISH SILK ON LINEN SAMPLER WROUGHT BY "MRS. HOG", early 19th c., decorated with house, flowers, figures and trees and strawberry border. Site- 13.5"x12.5".

Sold at Weiderseim Auctions February 14, 2015.

Estimate: $150-200

Price Realized: $1,600 (does not include buyers premium)


MINIATURE OVAL WATERCOLOR PORTRAIT OF A MOTHER, FATHER, AND CHILD, c.1830. Site- 4"x5".

Sold at Weiderseim Auctions February 14, 2015.

Estimate: $300-400

Price Realized: $1,000 (does not include buyers premium)




SUPERB 1786 JOHN ADAMS AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED.

Extraordinary John Adams Letter Regarding the Broken State of Relations Between the United States and Great Britain Following the American Revolutionary Wa

JOHN ADAMS (1735 - July 4, 1826). 2nd President of the United States (1797–1801), American Founding Father, Lawyer, Statesman, Diplomat and Leading Champion of American Independence in 1776, Defended the British Soldiers involved in the "Boston Massacre," a Leading Federalist. In 1785, John Adams was appointed the First American Minister to the Court of St. James's (Ambassador to Great Britain).

June 3, 1786-Dated Extraordinary Content, Autograph Letter Signed, "John Adams" as the American Minister to Great Britain, 3 pages, measuring 6.5" x 8", at London, Choice Very Fine. This historic Letter is written to Dr. Samuel Williams, who was the Hollis Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy at Harvard, under whom Adams’ sons, John Quincy and Charles, were studying. John Adam’s handwriting is excellent, being easily readable in rich brown ink upon clean laid period paper. There are some trivial separation at fold intersections, overall being exceptional in its appearance and eye appeal. Here, John Adams, as the American Minister to Great Britain, pens in full:

"London June 3. 1786 --- Sir --- I am much obliged to you for your Letter of the 9 of April. The Memoirs of the Academy of Arts and Sciences, shall be sent to Sir Joseph Banks, and the other Packet to Manheim.

I am much more at ease in my own Mind to have my Sons with you, than I should be to have them here with me, or at any other University and nothing can give me more satisfaction than to hear, that they behave with Propriety.

Dr. Gordon's voyage to England, and his Intention of remaining here, have probably diminished the Number of Subscribers in America, and I much doubt whether he will meet that encouragement in Europe which he expects. Nobody thrives, no Book will sell in this Country, unless it is encouraged by the Court, and the Dr's History be it what it may, will never be cherished there. The Court and the Nation would be glad to have the whole story blotted out of Memory. There is a general Disposition to prevent every American Work and Character from acquiring Celebration. Every Thing American is so unpopular, that even Printers and Booksellers are afraid of disobliging their Customers, by having any thing to do with it. Nothing of the kind will sell in Prose or Verse. I am sorry to say that it appears to me the Seperation between the two Nations must and will be final and perpetual in affection as well as in Laws. This, which is false Policy in this Country, will be ultimately its destruction, and make it a Signal Example to the World. It is a pity that because a People has been divided in halves, that the two Parts should be destined to be forever Rivals and Enemies at heart, and I cannot say that our own Countrymen, have in all Things acted a rational Part. Yet I do think it has been and is in the Power of this Cabinet, to restore a real Friendship between the two Peoples. But I think now there is very little chance of it because those very Men who acquired their Fame, Popularity and Power by professing friendship to us are now at least as bitter against us and the others.

All this however should not prevent us from doing our Duty, in all Points. We shall find our interest in it at last. --- With great Respect and Esteem I have the Honour to be, Sir, your most obedient and humble Servant -- (Signed) John Adams"

John Adams, 1735-1826, Second President of the United States from 1797-1801. A lawyer and early supporter of the independence movement, Adams defended the British soldiers accused of the Boston Massacre. In the Continental Congress, he helped Jefferson and Franklin draft the Declaration of Independence, which he signed.

In 1785, John Adams was appointed the first American minister to the Court of St. James's (ambassador to Great Britain). As Washington's Vice President, he founded the Federalist Party. Elected President in 1796, his term was marked by problems like the XYZ Affair with France, as well as the passage of the Alien and Sedition Acts. In his retirement, he carried on an extensive correspondence, and saw his son, John Quincy Adams, elected as the sixth President. He died at the age of ninety on July 4, 1826.

Sold at Early American History Auctions February 14, 2015.

Estimate: $35,000-40,000

Price Realized: $28,000 (does not include buyers premium)




EXTRAORDINARY JOHN QUINCY ADAMS POLITICAL LETTER.

Extraordinary Political Content John Quincy Adams Letter Regarding the Role of Former Unites States Presidents

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS (1767 - 1848). Sixth President of the United States (1825–1829); Negotiated with the United Kingdom over America's northern border with Canada; with Spain the annexation of Florida; authored the "Monroe Doctrine," thus one of the greatest Diplomats and Secretaries of State in American history.

December 6, 1830-Dated, Exceptional Political Content Autograph Letter Signed, "J. Q. Adams", 3 pages, measuring 8" x 10", Quincy, Massachusetts, Choice Extremely Fine. Bright and fresh, being very boldly written in deep rich brown ink upon excellent quality period laid paper. Adams evokes the names of former Presidents "...Washington accepted a military commission from his successor - Jefferson while he lived was the Rector of his own University - my father, Madison, and Monroe...". This superb content and physical quality Letter is written to former Senator Samuel L. Southard (1787-1842) of Trenton, New Jersey, who was then serving as Attorney General for the State of New Jersey. Two years later, Southard would be elected Governor of New Jersey, in which office he would serve just one year before resigning to fill a vacancy in the United States Senate. Here, John Quincy Adams writes, in full:

"Quincy 6 Dec. 1830 --- My dear Sir:

So it was written the day before I left home for Washington, where I now write on the day of the Winter Solstice. My purpose was to acknowledge the receipt of your kind Letter, and to assure you of the day's concern with which I had learnt your recent severe and long continued illness - called away by the bustle of preparations for departure upon a Journey, not yet short in winter. I was unable to return that day to my paper - and to foreclose the chances of final disappointment in the intention of inviting to you, brought it with me - The pleasure which I have enjoyed in the interval of meeting you at Philadelphia, ought not to deprive me of that of reciprocating the friendship of your letter.

Your reasons for declining to be inserted in the ticket of New Jersey, for Representatives in the next Congress, are amply sufficient for your justification. Intending to take the Seat which the People of my District have thought proper to assign to me in that body, no person can more sincerely lament than I shall, the necessity under which you have excluded yourself from it. In your case, I should have done the same - We were so long fellow labourers in the service of the public, and my confidence both in your personal and political character, was so deeply rooted, and unbounded, that in another career of public duty, I cannot but often miss the able coadjutor, and faithful friend which I always found in you - The loss will be mine, and I shall share it with our Country - yet I will hope and trust that she is not destined to be always bereft of your Services in her Councils.

For myself, taught in the School of Cicero, I shall say, 'defendi rempulicam adolescens, non disiram genex.' The People of the District in which I reside, when they called upon me to represent them in the Congress of the United States, consulted not my inclinations - To those of them who enquired better I would serve if elected, my answer was that I saw no warrantable ground upon which I could withhold my services if demanded. This was strictly the principle by which I was governed. Had I perceived any sound reason upon which my refusal could stand I should have refused. I could not disguise to myself the prospect that the service would neither be personally agreeable to me, nor without the mortification and its dangers - But there were considerations namely personal, which I deemed it my duty to disregard. A motive far more efficient caused my only hesitation - The service that a member of the House of Representatives in Congress can render to his Constituents, depends not entirely upon his dispositions, or even upon his capacity. There is much in his relative position - much in the feelings towards him entertained by those with whom he is to act - In times of warm party collusion, his influence while in the minority cannot be considerable, and if personally obvious to the prevailing majority, there is danger that his best exertions may serve but to draw defeat and obliging upon himself, without benefit to the nations or profit to his particular constituents. A member less qualified in other respects, will in such cases prove a more useful Representative - So possibly does this consideration even here present itself to my mind that it might have staggered my Resolution to undertake the service which the confidence of my fellow Citizens has committed to me, had not the Scavingers of the Administration indulged themselves in [?] from individuals whom they have had the delicacy to name, and of whose services as bullies or assassins for the benefit of the party they hold themselves quite authorised to dispose. Some of my friends appear to be affected by this threat of Algerine warfare, and have advised me not to expose myself to it - So different is its operation upon me that it has riveted my determination to take my seat. I will not distrust the feint principles of our Republican Institution, by stipulating that the rights of the People who elected me will be violated in my person by any desperado or ruffian partizan in or out of the house; and as I took the Oath of President of the United States, under an anonymous threat that I should meet a Brutus, if I went that day to the Capitol, I may now again say with Cicero in the divine Philippiie, to any dark hint of future violence 'contempsi catilinas gladios; non partinescam tuoi'. With regard to the general principle, it is my deliberate and well considered opinion that the discharge of the Office of President of the United States ought not in our Country to operate either as exclusion or exemption from the subsequent performance of service in either branch of the Legislature. There has indeed been hitherto no example of this, and one of my motives for consenting to serve has been, to get the example which I consider so eminently congenial to the Spirit of Republican Government, and which I cherish the hope will be followed by results signally useful to our Country - Washington accepted a military commission from his successor - Jefferson while he lived was the Rector of his own University - my father, Madison, and Monroe, served in Convention of fundamental legislation in their respective States - Had every one of them after the termination of their functions in the first executive office of the Union, gone through a term of Service in either house of Congress, the Country might now be reaping a harvest of their Labour the worth of which may be estimated by that which she has derived from their actual devotion to her cause and welfare.

I have given you an exposition of my views and motives on this occasion, in the confidence of our friendship, and the more readily, inasmuch as there has been a considerable diversity of opinion among my friends upon the propriety and expediency of the cause which I have taken - To the advice of my friends I have ever held the obligation of yielding a respectful deference. In this case the opinions of most of those with whom I have consulted concur with my own - Those of different mind dwell chiefly upon the troubles which my return to public life may bring upon myself, a consideration which however unworthy it might be of me to entertain, is not the less deserving of my gratitude as entertained by them - It is a source of high gratification to me that the approbation of your judgment is among those which have sanctioned the determination of your friend --- (Signed) J. Q. Adams."

Docket upon the last blank reverse page reads: "Mr. Adams -" and Mr. Adams Dec. 1830". This remarkable political and historic content Letter is fully in the hand of Adams and is absolutely the finest and most important Autograph Letter Signed that we have ever enjoyed the privilege to offer.

John Qunicy Adams served as the sixth President of the United States from March 4, 1825, to March 4, 1829. He took the oath of office on a book of laws, instead of the more traditional Bible, to preserve the separation of church and state. The Adams administration's record was thin; he made many proposals to Congress but it passed few of them; there were some minor foreign policy achievements. Adams proposed an elaborate program of internal improvements (roads, ports and canals), a national university, and federal support for the arts and sciences.

He favored a high tariff to encourage the building of factories, and restricted land sales to slow the movement west. Opposition from the states' rights faction of a hostile congress killed many of his proposals. He also reduced the national debt from $16 million to $5 million, the remainder of which was paid off by his successor.

Sold at Early American History Auctions February 14, 2015.

Estimate: $40,000-50,000

Price Realized: $38,000 (does not include buyers premium)


(BENEDICT ARNOLD, III) LEGAL DOCUMENT FROM 1754.

American General and Historic Traitor Benedict Arnold’s Father Seeks Restitution Legal Document

(BENEDICT ARNOLD, III), The Father of American Revolutionary War General and Famous Traitor, Benedict Arnold.

January 3, 1754-Dated, Partially-Printed Document, Signed by the Judge, Isaac Huntington, Choice Very Fine. This original document regards legal claims made in court at Norwich, Connecticut by Benedict Arnold (the Father of the historic American Revolutionary War General and Traitor Benedict Arnold). It is boldly printed upon clean period laid paper in deep black and has fully completed manuscript portions, measures 6" x 7" and is in choice, clean overall condition. It reads, in part:

"These are therefore in His Majesty's Name to command you, that of the money of the said Daniel Cuttler, or his goods or chattels within...".

This is a legal order to arrest and take the goods and property of a debtor, and to find him and bring him to the front for judgment. It is extremely rare to find anything at all on Benedict Arnold III (the father). This Document refers to the FATHER. His young son will be only 15 years old when he joins the Army during the French and Indian War. Later, his son’s Revolutionary War exploits are profound, and his history at that time well known and documented. Benedict Arnold’s father's name is written within this document three times, and once again upon the reverse side docket as the plaintiff in this court case. It does not bear his actual autograph. A long notation from the Sheriffs Deputy on the upper reverse describes that the payment was not made and he had the Daniel Cuttler, "committed unto the Keeper of the Goal (prison) in Windham" for nonpayment of the debt due to Benedict Arnold.

General Benedict Arnold was born the last of six children to Benedict Arnold III (1683–1761) and Hannah Waterman King in Norwich, Connecticut, in 1741.

He was named after his great-grandfather Benedict Arnold, an early governor of the Colony of Rhode Island, and his brother Benedict IV, who died in infancy before Benedict Arnold V was born.

Only Benedict and his sister Hannah survived to adulthood; his other siblings succumbed to yellow fever in childhood. Through his maternal grandmother, Arnold was a descendant of John Lothropp, an ancestor of at least four U.S. Presidents.

The Arnold family was well off until the future general's father made several bad business deals that plunged the family into debt, and became an alcoholic, forcing his son to withdraw from school at 14 because the family could not afford the expense.

His father's alcoholism and ill-health prevented him from training Arnold in the family mercantile business, but his mother's family connections secured an apprenticeship for Arnold with two of her cousins, brothers Daniel and Joshua Lathrop, who operated a successful apothecary and general merchandise trade in Norwich.

Sold at Early American History Auctions February 14, 2015.

Estimate: $1,000-1,500

Price Realized: $1,000 (does not include buyers premium)


MAJOR GENERAL HORATIO GATES 1777 LETTER TO GEORGE WASHINGTON.

American Major General "Horatio Gates" 1777 Dated Revolutionary War Letter to General George Washington

HORATIO GATES (1727-1806). American Major General during the Revolutionary War taking credit for the American victories in the Battles of Saratoga (1777) and was blamed for the American defeat at the Battle of Camden (1780).

January 31, 1777-Dated Autograph Letter Signed "Horatio Gates", 1 page, 7.75" x 12.75", Philadelphia, Very Fine. Gates writes to General Washington to discuss the prevention of spreading small pox. Letter reads in part, "Sir Yesterday Evening I had the Honour to receive your Excellency’s Letter of the 28th, Instant; I immediately consulted with Doctor Shippen, & Mr. Morris, upon the best method of preventing the spreading of The Infection Small Pox, & have Issued Orders to Oblige all the Troops & Recruits, upon their March from the Westward, to Avoid this City, & take their Route through German Town. Gates was given command of the Canadian Department and was quite disorganized with the retreat from Quebec. At this time, disease, especially smallpox, had taken a significant toll on the ranks. He eventually made it to Fort Ticonderoga, but had a tiff with Phillip Schuyler, as that was his territory. They eventually worked it out

In 1777, the Continental Congress blamed generals Schuyler and St. Clair for the loss of Fort Ticonderoga, though Gates had exercised a lengthy command in the region. Congress finally gave Gates command of the Northern Department on August 4th, 1777.

This famous and historic Painting of the Surrender of General Burgoyne by John Trumbull shows Major General Horatio Gates is in the center, with arms outstretched. Gates assumed command of the Northern Department on August 19 and led the army during the defeat of British General Burgoyne's invasion in the Battles of Saratoga.

While Gates and his supporters took credit for the victory, military action was directed by a cohort of field commanders led by Benedict Arnold, Enoch Poor, Benjamin Lincoln, and Daniel Morgan. Arnold in particular took the field against Gates' orders and rallied the troops in a furious attack on the British lines, suffering serious injuries to his leg. John Stark's defeat of a sizable British raiding force at the Battle of Bennington, Stark's forces killed or captured over 900 British soldiers, was also a substantial factor in the outcome at Saratoga.

General Gates stands front and center in John Trumbull's painting of the Surrender of General Burgoyne at Saratoga, which hangs in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda. By Congressional resolution, a gold medal was presented to Gates to commemorate his victories over the British in the Battles of Bennington, Fort Stanwix and Saratoga.

Sold at Early American History Auctions February 14, 2015.

Estimate: $10,000-15,000

Price Realized: $9,000 (does not include buyers premium)


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