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PAIR OF ETCHED GLASS DECANTER, 9th c., inscribed L. Wine, 9,5" h.

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $60-100

Price Realized: $615


HISTORICAL BLUE STAFFORDSHIRE AMERICA AND INDEPENDENCE PLATTER, stamped Clews, 14.75" w., 12.25" d., together with an open vegetable dish, stamped Clews, 2.5" h., 11.25" w.

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $1,476


SIX BIRDCAGE WINDSOR SIDE CHAIRS, ca. 1830.

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $250-450

Price Realized: $660


CONTINENTAL CARVED AND PAINTED HORSE PULL TOY, TOGETHER WITH A CART, A TWO-HORSE TEAM, AND SIX INDIVIDUAL CARVED HORSES.

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $200-400

Price Realized: $1,080


LYMAN EMERSON COLE (AMERICAN 1812-1878), OIL ON PANEL PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN, signed verso, inscribed Troy, NY 1841, 30" x 24".

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $400-800

Price Realized: $1,320


TWO SLIP DECORATED REDWARE CHARGERS, 19th c., together with a loaf dish, largest - 15" diameter.

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $300-600

Price Realized: $1,020


NEW ENGLAND HEPPLEWHITE MAHOGANY SIDEBOARD, ca. 1805, with extensive line, barber pole, and checkered inlays, 40.5" h., 59.75" w.

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $500-1,000

Price Realized: $2,400


PAINTED TRADE SIGN WITH AN EAGLE, 19th c., probably Lancaster, Pennsylvania, inscribed Tobias M. Miller's, 20" x 33.5".

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $300-500

Price Realized: $2,160


NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL MAHOGANY CARD TABLE, ca. 1815, 30.5" h., 37" w.

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $500-1,000

Price Realized: $1,680


STAR OF BETHLEHEM QUILT, 19th c., purportedly done by Mary Justus of Philadelphia, 102" x 102".

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $500-1,000

Price Realized: $1,320


PENNSYLVANIA QUEEN ANNE WALNUT DINING CHAIR, ca. 1760, together with a corner chair.

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $600-1,000

Price Realized: $1,800


TWO DELAWARE VALLEY LADDERBACK ARMCHAIRS, 18th c. each with five arched slats.

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $600-1,000

Price Realized: $1,800


WILLIAM & MARY WALNUT DRESSER BOX, 18th c., 8.25" h., 13.5" w.

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $400-700

Price Realized: $1,140


NEW ENGLAND CHERRY MULE CHEST, late 18th c., 40.25" h., 38" w.

Sold at Pook and Pook June 17-18, 2014.

Estimate: $200-400

Price Realized: $1,140


SHENANDOAH VALLEY OF VIRGINIA DECORATED STONEWARE PITCHER, salt glazed, approximately one-gallon capacity, high-shouldered form with incised double rings on shoulder and neck, flat-top rim, and medial-ridge strap handle with lower thumb impression, light cut-off lines under base. Brushed cobalt wide-bloom tulip decoration on front, neck with upturned feathers flanking the feathered spout, additional cobalt at upper handle terminal. Probably Augusta or Rockingham County. Circa 1860-1880. 10" H, 4.5" D rim.

Catalogue Note: This pitcher is one of four recorded from the same unidentified pottery, three of which were found in northern Augusta or Rockingham Co. Each features decoration that is related to products of John D. Heatwole in Rockingham Co. and Charles F. Decker of Washington Co., Tennessee. The common link between the two potteries is one Charles Bensfelt, a journeyman potter from Prussia who was employed by Heatwole, but by 1870 was potting in Augusta Co. at the Mt. Sidney pottery, and later moved onto Tennessee near the Decker site. Research on this potter and the Mt. Sidney pottery is ongoing.

Condition: Excellent condition, shallow outer-edge chip to side of rim, hairline across lower handle terminal.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $500-800

Price Realized: $1,610


STAMPED "W. H. LEHEW & CO / STRASBURG VA." SHENANDOAH VALLEY OF VIRGINIA DECORATED STONEWARE PITCHER, salt glazed, approximately half-gallon capacity, slightly ovoid form with incised shoulder ring, slightly flared neck, rounded rim, and strap handle. Brushed cobalt dropped-feather decoration surrounding shoulder and below rim. Stamp in serrated frame and with reversed S's. The pottery of William H. Lehew (b.c. 1825-aft. 1891). Circa 1860-1880. 9" H, 4,375" D rim.

Literature: Stamp as Comstock - Pottery of the Shenandoah Valley Region, p. 295, fig. 5.263.

Provenance: Property of a Williamsburg, VA private collector.

Condition: Rim with a shallow interior chip and a light 2.5" hairline, shallow chip to foot and very minor firing line at base.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $400-600

Price Realized: $1,610


STAMPED "ROCKBRIDGE", SHENANDOAH VALLEY OF VIRGINIA DECORATED STONEWARE JAR, salt glazed, approximately two-gallon capacity, tall ovoid form with two incised neck rings, rounded rim, and arched rounded handles with elongated terminals. Brushed cobalt drape decoration on unmarked side, additional cobalt highlighting stamp. Attributed to John Morgan's Bustle-Firebaugh Pottery or the Rockbridge Baths Pottery. Circa 1830-1850. 13" H, 5" D rim.

Literature: See Russ/Crawford/Lyle - Rockbridge Co. Artists & Artisans, p. 180 for similar examples.

Provenance: Property of a Lexington, VA private collector.

Condition: Excellent undamaged condition.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $2,760


MONUMENTAL JANE LEW, WEST VIRGINIA DECORATED STONEWARE COOLER, salt glazed, "10" gallon brushed capacity, tall beehive form with two heavy strap handles, rounded mouth, and lower bung hole molded with faux screw heads around ring. Brushed cobalt "Lady Slipper" decoration below two stripes centering the capacity designation flanked by flower heads. Circa 1875. 22" H, 13" D base.

Provenance: Recently surfaced in a Kentucky collection.

Condition: Remarkable condition with no damage or restorations, some light surface crazing.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $3,735.50


PAINTED TURNED TREENWARE MORTAR, deep circular form, with appropriate turned pestle. Excellent original dry blue-painted surface. Second half 19th century. 8" H, 5.875" D rim.

Provenance: From a 35-year Augusta Co., VA collection.

Condition: Very good as-found condition with light cracks at base and normal wear.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $100-150

Price Realized: $805


NEW ENGLAND PAINTED BENTWOOD PANTRY BOXES, LOT OF TWO, each of oval form with tacked finger-lap construction and wooden pins securing the top and bottom, red example embossed "Levi Beal" on top. Excellent old blue- and red-painted surfaces. Second half 19th century. 2" H, 4" x 5.25" and 2.75" H, 4.75" x 6.625".

Provenance: From a 35-year Augusta Co., VA collection.

Condition: Very good to excellent condition, red example with some shallow loss to box rim and small stain on top, otherwise not breaks or losses.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $300-500

Price Realized: $1,150


RARE SIGNED GEORGE REED (WINCHESTER, VIRGINIA, ACTIVE 1792-1821) COPPER TEA KETTLE, dovetailed body with applied gooseneck spout and trefoil handle stamped "G. REED" in rectangular reserve, domed lid with button-style finial. Old polished surface. Circa 1792-1821. 12.5" HOA, 11.25" DOA.

Literature: See Horvath/Poston - Early American Copper Tea Kettles, pp. 167-168 for information on George Reed.

Provenance: Property of a private collector.

Catalogue Note: George Reed was a copper and tinsmith as well as a merchant in Winchester, Virginia for nearly 30 years. An Irish immigrant, Reed became an important member of the community, serving as mayor, magistrate, and High Sheriff of Frederick County during his lifetime. He was also an ordained Methodist minister and is recognized as an early practitioner and advocate of Methodism. Built circa 1798, his home and shop on the corner of Braddock and Piccadilly Streets still stand today in the heart of old Winchester.

Condition: Very good condition with only a few minute dents and the usual calcium deposits in the bottom.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $2,000-4,000

Price Realized: $2,990


PENNSYLVANIA CAST-IRON DIMINUTIVE HEATING STOVE, marked "HAYS & CO", cast at the Hays (Charlotte) Furnace, Perry Co., PA, three hinged lift-off doors, raised on four hoof-like feet. Brass plaque mounted on the stove is engraved "From Cedar Grove / Isaac W. and Sarah Morris / About 1796 / John T. and Lydia T. Morris". First quarter 19th century. 17.5" H, 23" x 10.5".

Provenance: Property of a Shenandoah Valley collector.

Catalogue Note: Cedar Grove is one of the oldest houses open to the public in Fairmont Park, Philadelphia. It was built in 1748 in the Frankford section of Philadelphia and moved to Fairmont Park in 1926-28. The house served as a summer home to five generations of the Paschall and Morris families, Quakers who came to America at the time of William Penn. This stove was likely used in one of the utility rooms or the guest bed chamber.

Condition: Very good condition with no breaks or losses.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $200-400

Price Realized: $517.50


MID-ATLANTIC CONESTOGA WAGON ACCOUTREMENTS, LOT OF TWO, comprising a wrought-iron and chestnut jack, the shaft with punched decoration and "1823", and a grease bucket with leather lid and wooden paddle. First quarter 19th century. 25" and 13" H as shown.

Provenance: From a private Virginia collection.

Condition: Jack in good as-found condition, operable, lacking wood handle and iron base mount, bucket with lots of grease residue, leather strap detached at one side.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $100-200

Price Realized: $138.00


SIGNED SHEET-IRON AND BRASS PAIR OF HOG-SCRAPER PUSH-UP CANDLESTICKS, circular slightly domed base supporting a straight shaft with side ejector knob impressed "HSM" and upper hook, brass triple-ring medial wedding band. 19th century. 9" H, 4" D base.

Provenance: Property of a Charlottesville, VA gentleman.

Condition: Very good condition with moderate pitting, primarily to the bases.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $50-100

Price Realized: $546.25


MID-ATLANTIC SIGNED AND DATED 1853 "FRIENDSHIP ALBUM" APPLIQUE QUILT, sixteen 16.5" SQ blocks each with a floral patterned sprig or wreath in print fabric and including one chintz example, most signed by quilter, names include Barbara Wintz, Catharine Conrad, A. Elizabeth Hoover, Elizabeth Hoover, Mary Dull, Margaret Hoover, Lousia G. Keiffer, Sarah A. Keller, Emma A. Field, Elizabeth A. Greathill (probably), and a heart with "Adeline Harrel / Pleasantville ? ? 1853", sawtooth border to each side with double-bands of hand stitching, various patterns of hand quilting to each block including straight-line and floral. 1853. 83" x 85".

Provenance: From a 35-year Augusta Co., VA collection.

Purchased from Pat & Rich Garthoeffner, Lititz, Pennsylvania.

Condition: Very good overall condition, some scattered light stains and back with moderate staining, wear and deterioration to binding, several very minor holes.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $500-800

Price Realized: $2,760


IMPORTANT ZACHARIAH S. ROBINSON (VIRGINIA / ILLINOIS, 1806-1873) FOLK-ART-CARVED PATRIOTIC CANE / WALKING STICK, possibly maple, with inked and pyrographic decorations, an exceptional example with a profusion of well-executed shallow relief-carved vignettes, handle with carved lion-head holding what appears to be a lamb in its jaws, over a profusely carved shaft featuring a bold depiction of Abraham Lincoln holding a document scroll and flanked by Classical scenes, Union soldiers, including possibly Grant on horseback, eagles, lions, a serpent, a griffin, a fish, an alligator, an elephant, and other elements. Beautiful early worn surface with warm, rich color. Circa 1865. 35" L.

Literature: See Sotheby's Sale 6716, Important Americana: The Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Henry P. Deyerle, May 26 and 27, 1995, lot 716 for a signed example by the carver.

Provenance: From a Richmond area private collection.

Ex-collection of Andrew Jackson Montague (1862-1937), Danville, VA, former Governor of Virginia (1902-1906).

Catalogue Note: Zachariah S. Robinson (1806-1873) was born in New Market, Shenandoah Co., VA. In 1830 he married Hannah Stover in the same county, and soon thereafter the couple began what would become a westward migration by way of the southwestern portion of the state. In 1837 the couple moved to present-day Roanoke and built a large 12-room brick home on a major wagon thoroughfare and commenced operations as a tavern. The completion of a new railroad along a different route soon forced Robinson to close his tavern and sell the property in 1846, whereupon he secured new employment as postmaster in the area. Some years later, he and his large family moved to eastern Illinois, near Ashley, where he eventually died in 1873.

Robinson and his wife had fourteen children in all, and, demonstrating the carver's apparent penchant for Classical History, many were given names ranging from Cicero to Macedon to Minerva. With the use of Classical imagery on the present lot, it is no surprise that Robinson's interest in the era would permeate not just his intellectual and creative outlook but also his personal life. Clearly the carver was attempting to view and understand the events of the American Civil War partly through the lens of standardized Western notions of Ancient history, and by associating figures such as Lincoln, and possibly Grant, with Roman or Biblical iconography, the artist perhaps wanted to link these leaders, and the cataclysmic struggle in which they had just engaged, with the Classical world, thereby elevating the historical significance of the individuals involved, their ideas, and their actions in the wake of the war.

Whatever the implicit meaning of the cane's elaborate composition may be, the work stands out as a tour-de-force of carving with highly desirable subject matter and provenance. Once owned by Andrew Jackson Montague (1862-1937), Governor of Virginia from 1902-1906, and Congressman from 1912 until his death in 1937, and likely acquired by Montague as a young lawyer in Danville, VA in the late 19th century, this cane was clearly identified as an important piece of Americana at an early date.

Robinson's work is represented in private collections and several institutions, including Colonial Williamsburg, and he is recognized as one of the nation's premier 19th-century carvers, this work, created later in his life, being one of the finest examples known. Furthermore, given the arc of Robinson's migration, from New Market to Roanoke to Ashley, Illinois, and the overtly topical nature of the work's imagery, this cane provides us with an interesting glimpse into the life of a 19th-century folk artist, a figure who so often remains anonymous. The appearance of this piece on the market represents a rare opportunity to acquire an exceptional work of American folk art that is imbued with historical significance.

Condition: Excellent condition. Likely replaced metal ferrule.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $4,000-6,000

Price Realized: $4,887.50


VIRGINIA TOOLED LEATHER KEY BASKET, shaped-rim oblong form with incised geometric decorations consisting of an X flanking to each handle terminal and bold concentric diamonds on each end, decoration with remnants of original paint or putty highlighting, original rounded leather handle and lining. Possibly by S. S. Cottrell and Co., Richmond, VA. Second half 19th century. 6" HOA, 2.75" H end rim, 3.5" x 9".

Literature: See MESDA - Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts, May 1982, volume VIII, number 1, pp. 49-61, R. Lewis Wright, "Key Baskets", for a discussion.

Provenance: Acquired from the Dixon family of Boomer, West Virginia around 1950.

Condition: Very good as-found original condition, rim with wear and light losses, otherwise only some expected wear.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $1,000-2,000

Price Realized: $2,185


RARE AND IMPORTANT KENTUCKY FOLK ART SCHOOL GIRL MAPS, LOT OF TWO, watercolor and ink on laid paper, both fine examples by Elizabeth Craig, one depicting the United States and inscribed A Map of the United States of North America / Drawn by E. B. Craig at Reminiscence" at bottom. Other depicting North America and inscribed " A map of North Americ (sic) drawn by Elizabeth Craig at Domestic Academy" at bottom. Each paper with watermark for Thomas Gilpin & Company, an early paper manufacturing enterprise in Wilmington, Delaware that was in operation 1787-1837. Unframed when found, all currently housed in temporary modern frames. Circa 1810. United States 13.125" x 16.25" object, North America 16.25" x 20.5" object.

Provenance: Property of Maurice Derby Leach, Jr., and Virginia Baskett Leach, Lexington, VA.

Catalogue Note: These exceptionally rare school girl maps descended in the Cowan and Craig families of central Kentucky. Captain John Cowan (1748-1819) was an early explorer, settler, and developer of the state. Likely born in Augusta Co., VA, Cowan married Mary Craig (1748-1837), the daughter of Captain John Craig (1718-1802) and Sarah Laird of Rockingham Co., VA, on September 14, 1781 near Harrisonburg, VA. Captain Craig was also an early Kentucky pioneer and settler who eventually took up residence in Lincoln Co., KY. In fact, the Craig's residence on Gilbert's Creek is noted on John Filson's famed 1784 map of Kentucky produced nearly eight years before statehood. John Cowan's family ultimately settled in Danville, a growing town situated in Boyle Co. just northwest of the Craig homestead in Lincoln Co. Both the Cowan's and the Craig's were important families in the early history of Kentucky, and they maintained close ties through marriage, business, and other matters. While the bulk of the material from the Leach estate descended through the Cowan family, several items in the group are known to have originated with the Craig's. Such is the case with these maps.

Preliminary research has revealed that such a "Domestic Academy", also called the "Ladies Domestic Academy" was in operation in Washington County, KY, circa 1807-1814, and was overseen by a Mrs. Louisa Caroline Warburton Fitzherbert Keats, whose husband was a cousin of John Keats, the English Romantic poet. Lewis Collins writes of the Domestic Academy and of Mrs. Keats in his Historical Sketches of Kentucky: History of Kentucky, Volume 2, published in 1878: "The most celebrated female school in the west at the time was in Washington, 1807-1812; that of Mrs. Louisa Caroline Warburton Fitzherbert Keats, sister of Geo. Fitzherbert, of St. James Square, London, and wife of Rev. Mr. Keats, a deaf and uninteresting old gentleman, relative of the great English poet George (sic) Keats. Among her scholars were daughters of distinguished citizens, and who themselves became the wives of like distinguished men - daughters of John Breckinridge (late U. S. attorney), Gov. Thos. Worthington, and Gen Findlay, of Ohio, and the wives of Gen Peter P. Porter, of N. Y. (U. S. secretary of war), Gov. Duncan McArthur, of Ohio, John J. Crittenden, of Ky, etc." The school's operations were short-lived, however, apparently due in part to scandalous behavior involving Mrs. Keats and a male instructor at the academy.

These drawings are very early works for KY school girl art; in fact, the Domestic Academy seems to be one of the earliest female educational institutions in the state, or the region for that matter. The present works are rare survivals made even more desirable by their pleasing design, exceptional provenance, and fine condition. The appearance of these works on the market represents a unique opportunity to acquire rare artifacts of early Kentucky history, from a period when institutions were brand new and the untamed frontier was still close at hand. These school girl works present us with a unique impression of the world in geo-political terms at a time when the young nation, not unlike the young Craig girls, was still struggling to define its own identity. Additionally, the Craig sister watercolor maps are a tangible indicator of the country's rapidly transforming social, cultural, and economic character, particularly in relation to newly-developing notions about the types of roles women in the nascent republic would be expected to fill. A fascinating glimpse into early Kentucky life, these maps from the Domestic Academy typify the pioneer's instinctual drive for self-improvement and advancement and echo our own innate desire to understand the complex world around us.

Condition: The maps were discovered rolled up in a cardboard tube at the consignor's home and must have always remained stored out of light, as they are overall in very good, bright condition. Minor losses to edges and peripheral creases, and very minor toning and staining to paper.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $5,750


DAVID HUBER (HOOVER), SHENANDOAH CO., SHENANDOAH VALLEY OF VIRGINIA FRAKTUR BY THE STONY CREEK ARTIST, watercolor and ink on paper, drapes and tassels above a winged angel and a central heart-form reserve inscribed in German for David Huber born in Virginia Shenandoah County, July 1, 1809 to Johannes and Elizabeth Huber, brightly colored pomegranates and tulips below the heart. Still retains some of the drapery color which is often absent. Not framed. Reserve. Circa 1810. 7.875" to 9.75".

Literature: For a discussion of the elusive Stony Creek artist see Wust/Martin - Virginia Fraktur (2011 expanded edition), pp. 4-6 and 21-23.

Provenance: Property of a Virginia private collector.

Catalogue Note: David Huber/Hoover (1809-1887) was born in Woodstock, VA to John and Elizabeth Fravel Hoover. He first married Rebecca Sheetz in 1834 and remarried in 1860 to Susan Keller (1816-1889). All three are buried in the Sheetz Cemetery #2 in Woodstock.

Condition: Good as-found condition, some loss to edges, separation at fold creases, verso with old reinforcement strip to center crease and old translation.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $4,312.50


OUTSTANDING AMERICAN FOLK ART PAINTING OF MOUNT VERNON, oil on canvas, a bold depiction of Washington's home perched on a bluff overlooking the Potomac River with figures in the foreground, an African-American servant entering the rear of the home, and circling birds above the weathervane set atop the cupola. Likely influenced by contemporaneous printed depictions of the Washington home. Pencil markings outlining home and figures. No signature located. Label verso reads "Bicentennial Inventory / 'Mount Vernon, View of' / Loan of Mrs. George Neal" along with an inventory label from the Smithsonian Institution. Housed in a 19th century walnut frame with gilt liner. Reserve. Mid 19th century. 17.5" x 23.5" sight, 22.75" x 28.75" OA.

Exhibited: Recorded by the Smithsonian Exhibition and likely included in the Bicentennial Exhibition, 1976.

Provenance: From the estate of Jane K. Neal, Huntington, WV.

Catalogue Note: The present lot is from the estate of Jane K. Neal (WV, 1923-2013), a talented and accomplished woman of the 20th century who attained some degree celebrity in her day. Raised during the Depression, Neal demonstrated musical and performance talent at a young age and even hosted her own local radio show at the age of 15. She went on to Marshall College but left before attaining her degree in order to work as a secretary with the FBI. Here in Washington, DC she continued to pursue her singing career, studying and performing with the Washington Opera Guild. Neal's professional life took a different turn, however, when a Washington Post Christmas photograph of her circulated around the country on the Associated Press wire service, sparking a modeling and design career that included graduation from the Barbizon School of Modeling in New York City. Later in life, she even hosted a noontime television talk show in Huntington, WV, interviewing such notables as Jackie Kennedy. A woman of diverse talents, Jane K. Neal, along with her husband George Neal, Jr., collected a wide variety of art and antiques during their marriage. This painting was said to have been discovered by Mrs. Neal in the basement of an old home in Huntington in the 1960's. It was extremely dirty, and she had the work cleaned and conserved.

Condition: Relined on old, possibly original stretcher with areas of associated retouch, particularly at bottom. Heavy streaked layer of varnish applied during conservation.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $3,000-5,000

Price Realized: $6,900


SAMUEL BETTS (LONDON, ACTIVE 1645-1673) EBONIZED BRACKET CLOCK, engraved brass dial signed "Samuel Betts Londini" in script at lower edge, double-fusee movement, housed in an ebonized case with separate base. Movement mid 17th century, case possibly later. 19.754" HOA, 8.25" x 9" dial.

Provenance: Property of Maurice Derby Leach, Jr., and Virginia Baskett Leach, Lexington, VA.

From the collection of Kenneth Henry Leach, England, purchased c. 1911-1912 at Hope's in Christ Church, England.

Catalogue Note: Samuel Betts (active 1640-1673) was an important early English clockmaker who made both watches and bracket clocks. Betts is often associated with Edward East (1610-1693), who is generally regarded as one of the finest clockmakers of the period and served as clockmaker to Charles I and Charles II. In 1673 Samuel Betts was succeeded in business by Jacobus Markwick, another significant early English clockmaker.The present clock was extensively examined by W. David Todd of the Smithsonian Institution in 1991, and a copy of his report will be made available to the purchaser.

CONDITION UPDATE 6/17/14: Very good visual condition, unknown mechanical condition, alterations. Mr. W. David Todd, Museum Specialist at the Smithsonian Institution, concludes in a 1991 report on the clock that the alterations to the works were likely done by the "hand of its maker and the conversion of its escapement was undertaken only to improve its timekeeping ability".

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $109,250


SIGNED "PHILIP FRANCK / NEW BERLIN" PENNSYLVANIA FEDERAL WALNUT TALL CASE CLOCK, eight-day brass works with original paint-decorated iron dial signed "Philip Franck / New Berlin", hood featuring a broken-arch pediment, case featuring a shaped door flanked by fluted quarter columns, cut-out skirt at base, raised on flaring French feet. Poplar secondary wood. Weights and pendulum present. Old note inside case reads "This clock was the property / of D. R. Boilean until October / 12th 1897 when it arrived / at the house of A. M. McLain / on above date. / Made in 1825". Circa 1825. 99.5" HOA, 19" WOA, 10.25" DOA.

Provenance: Property of Adeline Harmon Coles Cox, Richmond, VA.

Condition: Finials and carved elements to pediment possibly replaced. Loss of two rear columns to hood. Minor wear to painted decoration on dial. Lacking small section of molding beneath hood. Replaced door latch, and minor wear, losses, and repairs to feet.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $5,750


FINE AND RARE NEW MARKET, SHENANDOAH CO., SHENANDOAH VALLEY OF VIRGINIA FEDERAL HARD POPLAR CHILD'S CHEST OF DRAWERS, a rare and desirable form, the rectangular top with applied beaded-edge molding over a dovetailed case featuring four graduated and scratch-beaded drawers fitted with original turned wooden knobs, raised on a fully-framed base highlighted by a cut-out skirt and modified bandy-like feet in the French style. Yellow pine secondary wood, horizontal two-board back attached with outstanding rose-head nails. Early, possibly original, varnished surface. Reserve. Circa 1795-1805. 27" H, 10.75" x 25.25" top.

Provenance: The estate of Hazel Olene Kibler, Woodstock, VA.

Catalogue Note: This outstanding child's chest of drawers descended in the Kibler family of Shenandoah Co., VA. It was likely made for Philip Kibler, Sr. (1779-1871), passed to his son, Philip Kibler, Jr. (1817-1896) and then to his son, Alfred Kibler (1852-1914), then to his son, Obed Kibler (1882-1981), and finally to his daughter, Hazel Kibler (1913-2013).

Note: The distinctive base seen on this desk, consisting of modified French feet built on a full frame, has been seen on numerous other early 19th century case pieces from the New Market area, but until recently has not been attributable to a specific cabinetshop. With the discovery by JSE & Associates in 2009 of the signed James McCann desk, currently in the collection of the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley in Winchester, the group can now be firmly attributed to the Jeremiah Evans cabinetshop in New Market, Virginia. Evans likely established his New Market operation in the late 18th century and had progressed enough in the enterprise by 1802 to take on James McCann as an apprentice. McCann and Evans collaborated in the cabinetmaking business for the next 15 years, and the younger McCann most likely continued to operate the shop after Evans' death in 1816. Research on this cabinetshop is ongoing.

Condition: Good as-found condition, top with loss to end moldings, loss of strip moldings on stiles, small loss to bottom drawer facing, loss of beaded base molding on one end, minor expected wear to feet. Wear and minor staining to top.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $6,000-9,000

Price Realized: $10,925


PETERSBURG, VIRGINIA CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY SMOKING / CORNER CHAIR, a fine and rare example, with broad D-shaped arm rail with applied low crest and out-turned rounded terminals, over two complex carved splats featuring four vertical piercing over a figure-eight element within a vase-shaped frame, flanked by columnar arm supports, above a square molded-edge seat frame with deeply scalloped side rails, raised on square-tapered legs. Later replaced seat frame. Old historic surface with deep, rich color. Circa 1785-1795. 33.25" H, 18" SQ seat.

Literature: Hurst/Prown - Southern Furniture, 1680-1830, pps. 111-112, figs. 25-25.2. Prown, "A Cultural Analysis of Furniture-Making in Petersburg, Virginia, 1760-1820", MESDA, Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts, Vol. XVIII, No. 1, May 1992, p. 45, fig. 35.

Provenance: Ex-estate of Lillian Sydnor, Richmond, VA.

Catalogue Note: Catalogue Note: This corner chair descended in the Sydnor family of Richmond and Petersburg, VA, an important early Virginia family with a long history in the Commonwealth. The Sydnors were also connected with another prominent Virginia family, the Burwells, Ann Spotswood Burwell (1808-1858) of Mecklenburg Co. having married Beverley Sydnor (1805-1881) in 1828.

This corner chair is possibly from the same shop as that which made a set of chairs for the family of William R. Davie, an important planter and politician in Halifax Co., North Carolina who looked to Petersburg nearby for fashionable furniture when it was needed. A side chair from the Davie's set is illustrated by Jonathan Prown, "A Cultural Analysis of Furniture-Making in Petersburg, Virginia, 1760-1820", MESDA, Journal of Early Southern Decorative Arts, Vol. XVIII, No. 1, May 1992, p. 45, fig. 35. A rare survival from an important early Southern manufacturing and mercantile center, this appearance of this armchair on the market represents a unique opportunity to acquire a beautiful and authentic 18th-century piece of Virginia seating furniture.

Condition: Good condition overall with expected wear to surface. Converted to a necessary chair in the early 19th century with associated old replaced support strips to inner back rails. Crack and old repair to back edge of right foot. Cracks and old repairs to splats with some separation to left splat which is loose.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $5,000-8,000

Price Realized: $16,100


ROBERT WALKER (ATTRIBUTED) FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA CARVED CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY SIDE CHAIR, a fine and rare example, the shaped crest with heavily scrolled ears over a complex carved splat mortised directly into the solid arched rear rail and featuring three vertical piercing interlaced with a beaded ribbon over a pierced heart, above a trapezoidal beaded-edge seat frame and raised on slightly cabriole legs carved with shells on the knees and graduated husks underneath, terminating in compressed ball-and-claw feet, rounded rear legs ending in square feet. Early oak and pine slip-seat frame. Old refinished surface with deep, rich color. Attributed to the shop of Robert Walker (Fredericksburg, VA, c. 1710-1777). Circa 1745-1760. 38.5" H, 15.5 x 21.25" seat.

Provenance: Property of a private Maryland collector.

Catalogue Note: Robert Walker (Fredericksburg, VA, c.1710-1777) operated a cabinet shop in Fredericksburg and worked in a partnership with his brother William Walker (?-1750), with whom he likely immigrated from Scotland in the 1730's. William, and Robert were trained in a Scottish system that prepared them as both builders and cabinetmakers, and evidence suggests that the Walker brothers collaborated on a number of significant building projects in Colonial Virginia, likely including Stratford Hall, the iconic Lee family home overlooking the Potomac River in Westmoreland Co., VA. These commissions would have called for complex architectural ornamentation to the house interior as well as similarly executed furniture and accessories that only master craftsman would be capable of producing. The Walkers were such craftsman and continued to receive important commissions in the 1740's, culminating in William Walker's contract in 1749 to redesign and rebuild the capitol building in Williamsburg, which had burned recently. When William died a year later in 1750, Robert helped to officiate the dispersal of his brother's estate and then continued on in his own business ventures. For the next 27 years, Robert Walker operated a highly successful cabinet shop that catered to significant Virginia families such as the Washingtons and produced some truly significant pieces of early American craftsmanship. The fairly substantial group of pieces that has been attributed to Robert and William Walker was initially associated with the shop of Peter Scott in Williamsburg, VA, but has been clearly identified through the scholarship of Robert A. Leath as, in fact, the work of the Walkers in Fredericksburg, VA. The present side chair is a fine example of the early work of Robert Walker, and its appearance on the market represents a unique opportunity to a acquire an important piece of seating furniture created by a premier Colonial Virginia craftsman.

Condition: Expected wear to surface and to carved feet. Chair likely disassembled and later reassembled with blocking removed, corner brackets replaced, and rails re-pinned. Top of left leg at interior corner where rails meet with pieced repair not visible when seat is in place. Knee returns likely replaced, and one detached but present. Minor crack to lower section of splat.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $3,000-5,000

Price Realized: $28,750


TIDEWATER VIRGINIA CHIPPENDALE FIGURED WALNUT DESK AND BOOKCASE, two-piece construction, an impressive piece, the bookcase top with two eight-pane doors opening to three fixed shelves; the base with a hinged fall-board concealing an interior fitted with cubbies, small drawers, and a central prospect door, over four graduated drawers separated by full dust boards, raised on an applied base with original tall cut-out bracket feet. Beautiful figured walnut primary and yellow pine secondary. Old refinished surface with mellow color. Possibly Southampton Co., VA. Circa 1760-1780. 94.5" H, 39" W, 20.25" D.

Provenance: Property of the Davis family, Luray, VA.

Catalogue Note: This desk and bookcase descended through approximately ten generations of the Davis and Woodhouse families of Virginia to the present owner. The Davis and Woodhouse families have deep roots in Virginia, the first immigrant ancestor having arrived from England in 1639. The present desk and bookcase in the neat and plain style favored by eastern Virginians in the 18th century is first recorded in the Davis family in 1770 in Southampton Co., VA. The particularly fine desk is noteworthy for its tall proportions, superior wood selection, and excellent provenance.

Condition: Bookcase top likely a later addition, possibly married from another piece. Expected wear to surface. Brasses replaced. A few pieced repairs to case and to drawer fronts. Small pads added to bottoms of bracket feet.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $3,000-5,000

Price Realized: $23,000


OUTSTANDING PENNSYLVANIA PAINT-DECORATED PINE DIMINUTIVE BLANKET CHEST, a fine example of desirable design, condition, and size, the rectangular hinged lid with applied moldings to edges over a dovetailed case above a base with applied edge molding raised on turned bun-like feet. Featuring original dry green- and yellow-painted decoration against a salmon-painted background. Discovered in Maryland. Circa 1830. 25" H, 30.75" W, 18.75" D.

Condition: Excellent original condition with slight warp to lid.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctioneers June 21, 2014.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $7,475


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