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SHENANDOAH VALLEY OF VIRGINIA DECORATED EARTHENWARE / REDWARE BOWL, lead-glazed interior and exterior, deep conical form with overhanging, sloping rim, fully glazed under base. Interior slip-decorated with yellow and manganese stripes over a spiked ground and slightly swirling center. Attributed to Christian or Jacob Adam and/or John Coffman, New Market, VA. 1811-1830. 3.75" H, 13.25" D.

Literature: See Comstock - The Pottery of the Shenandoah Valley Region, p. 203, fig. 5.7 for an example with identical rim.

Catalogue Note: A distinctive feature of this bowl is its fully glazed exterior including under the base. Several decorated bowls, firmly attributed to New Market, as well as a large amount of the wares attributed to John Coffman's New Market pottery also exhibit this characteristic. The Hagerstown-style of decoration seen on this bowl is directly related to Christian Adam's time spent potting in Hagerstown and the influence he brought with him to New Market. John Coffman and his brother Andrew apprenticed under Adam. When Christian moved west around 1822 John begin renting his pottery and eventually purchased it in 1827. John Coffman continued to produce pottery in New Market until his death in 1885.

Condition: Very good condition with only light wear to bottom, 2" hairline off rim, several flakes to outer edge of rim, four filed chips to underside of rim, only one of which shows slightly on top.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $1,000-2,000

Price Realized: $4,680


GREAT ROAD, TENNESSEE OR VIRGINIA (ATTRIBUTED) DECORATED EARTHENWARE / REDWARE MINIATURE JAR, lead- and manganese-glazed, graceful ovoid form with bold, wide, grooved arched handles, delicate round-top rim, and pronounced foot. Incised double sine-wave band around shoulder. Possibly by the Cain family of Sullivan Co., TN or the Haun shop, Greene Co., TN. 1820-1850. 3" H, 2.25" D rim, 2" D foot.

Provenance: Property of a Shenandoah Valley of Virginia private collector.

Catalogue Note: An extremely finely potted example with perfect proportions and in top condition.

Condition: Virtually mint with only two minute glaze flakes to edge of rim and a minor flake under the base.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $500-800

Price Realized: $2,340


DECORATED EARTHENWARE / REDWARE DISH, lead-glazed interior and exterior, truncated conical form with upright rim and pronounced foot. Yellow-slipped interior with Moravian-style swirled stripe decoration to entire face. 19th century. 2.5" H, 8.5" D.

Condition: Excellent condition, some light glaze flaking/roughness to rim and small chips to edge of foot.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $100-200

Price Realized: $11,700


RARE AND IMPORTANT KENTUCKY FOLK ART SCHOOL GIRL MAPS, LOT OF FIVE, descended in the Cowan and Craig families of Central Kentucky, including "A Map of the United States Drawn by Mary H. L. Craig at the Domestic Academy", "A Map of the World Drawn by Elizabeth B. Craig at the Domestic Academy", and "A Map of Kentucky by Charles Craig", several with watermark for Thomas Gilpin & Company, an early paper manufacturing enterprise in Wilmington, Delaware that was in operation 1787-1837. Unframed. Circa 1810. Larger examples 19" x 23".

Provenance: Property of Virginia Baskett Leach and the late Maurice Derby Leach, Jr., Lexington, VA.

Catalogue Note: Discovered rolled up in a cardboard tube in the consignor's home, these exceptionally rare school girl maps descended in the Cowan and Craig families of central Kentucky. Captain John Cowan (1748-1819) was an early explorer, settler, and developer of the state. Likely born in Augusta Co., VA, Cowan married Mary Craig (1748-1837), the daughter of Captain John Craig (1718-1802) and Sarah Laird of Rockingham Co., VA, on September 14, 1781 near Harrisonburg, VA. Captain Craig was also an early Kentucky pioneer and settler who eventually took up residence in Lincoln Co., KY. In fact, the Craig's residence on Gilbert's Creek is noted on John Filson's famed 1784 map of Kentucky produced nearly eight years before statehood. John Cowan's family ultimately settled in Danville, a growing town situated in Boyle Co. just northwest of the Craig homestead in Lincoln Co. Both the Cowan's and the Craig's were important families in the early history of Kentucky, and they maintained close ties through marriage, business, and other matters. While the bulk of the material from the Leach estate descended through the Cowan family, several items in the group are known to have originated with the Craig's. Such is the case with these maps. 

Preliminary research has revealed that such a "Domestic Academy", also called the "Ladies Domestic Academy" was in operation in Washington County, KY, circa 1807-1814, and was overseen by a Mrs. Louisa Caroline Warburton Fitzherbert Keats, whose husband was a cousin of John Keats, the English Romantic poet. Lewis Collins writes of the Domestic Academy and of Mrs. Keats in his Historical Sketches of Kentucky: History of Kentucky, Volume 2, published in 1878: "The most celebrated female school in the west at the time was in Washington, 1807-1812; that of Mrs. Louisa Caroline Warburton Fitzherbert Keats, sister of Geo. Fitzherbert, of St. James Square, London, and wife of Rev. Mr. Keats, a deaf and uninteresting old gentleman, relative of the great English poet George (sic) Keats. Among her scholars were daughters of distinguished citizens, and who themselves became the wives of like distinguished men - daughters of John Breckinridge (late U. S. attorney), Gov. Thos. Worthington, and Gen Findlay, of Ohio, and the wives of Gen Peter P. Porter, of N. Y. (U. S. secretary of war), Gov. Duncan McArthur, of Ohio, John J. Crittenden, of Ky, etc."

The school's operations were short-lived, however, apparently due, in part, to scandalous behavior involving Mrs. Keats and a male instructor at the school. 

These drawings are very early works for KY school girl art; in fact, the Domestic Academy seems to be one of the earliest female educational institutions in the region, or the state for that matter. The present works are rare survivals made even more desirable by their pleasing design and exceptional provenance. The discovery of the rare example depicting central Kentucky by Charles Craig, likely the brother of Mary and Elizabeth, adds another dimension to the story as well. The appearance of these works on the market represents a unique opportunity to acquire rare artifacts of early Kentucky history, from a period when institutions were brand new and the untamed frontier was still close at hand. These school girl works present us with a unique impression of the world in geo-political terms at a time when the young nation, not unlike the young Craig girls, was still struggling to define its own identity. Additionally, the Craig sister watercolor maps are a tangible indicator of the country's rapidly transforming social, cultural, and economic character, particularly in relation to newly-developing notions about the types of roles women in the nascent republic would be expected to fill. A fascinating glimpse into early Kentucky life, these maps from the Domestic Academy typify the pioneer's instinctual drive for self-improvement and advancement and echo our own innate desire to understand the complex world around us.

Condition: As-found condition with minor to moderate toning, foxing, and areas of staining/discoloration. Each with tears and losses, primarily to edges.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $500-800

Price Realized: $4,387.50


1803 JACOB FUCHS (FOX) FOLK ART FRAKTUR BIRTH AND BAPTISMAL CERTIFICATE, watercolor and ink on paper, featuring a pair of facing turkeys flanked by tulips, above the central reserve inscribed in German for Jacob Fuchs, born July 25, 1803, father Heinrich Fuchs, mother Anna Maria Steinbrecherin, lower edge with central heart flanked by Maltese crosses, three reserves with inscriptions. Housed under glass in a modern frame and mat. Attributed to the Wild Turkey Artist (Wythe Co., VA, active 1770-1822). Circa 1805. 7.5" x 12.25" sheet.

Literature: Parallels Earnest and Earnest - Papers for Birth Dayes, Vol. II, p. 819.

Provenance: Fresh to the market example recently discovered in North Carolina.

Catalogue Note: The so-called Wild Turkey Artist worked in Wythe Co., Virginia during the fourth quarter of the 18th century and first quarter of the 19th century, executing fraktur birth and baptismal certificates for German clientele, most of who had settled in the area after migrating down the Great Wagon Road. Likely a schoolmaster, whose identity remains unclear at present, he used both fraktur lettering and script and almost always employed facing turkey-like figures as important design elements in the overall composition. Both of these visual signatures are clearly identifiable on the present lot.

Approximately thirty examples by the artist are known, and most remain in the families for whom they were originally made. Consequently, very few fraktur by this artist appear on the open market. This recently discovered example is not recorded by Russell and Corinne Earnest.

Condition: As-found condition, diagonal stain from top center to lower left corner, several small age spots, light folds, normal fading.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $1,000-2,000

Price Realized: $11,700


SAMUEL T. TAYLOR (VIRGINIA, C.1806-1846) FOLK ART PORTRAIT OF A GIRL, OIL ON CANVAS, nearly full-length depiction of a youthful figure wearing high-waisted Empire gown and holding a dove, stylized setting featuring tasseled curtain and column framing a landscape background, no signature located, original canvas inscribed verso in artist's hand (recorded prior to relining) "H. E. Perkins / 3 years old last Oct. / March, 1845". Housed in a custom paint-decorated frame by Stephen Cherry and Peter Deen. RESERVE. Circa 1845. 37.5" x 26.5" sight, 45.5" x 34.5" OA.

Provenance: From the private collection of Dr. Charles and Elizabeth Umstott, Newport, News, VA.

Ex-Priddy & Beckerdite, Inc., Richmond, VA, purchased 1988.

Catalogue Note: Little is known about the itinerant Virginia portrait painter Samuel T. Taylor though a sizable body of work has been attributed to him. Working primarily in the Piedmont region along the James River Basin, Taylor seems to have secured commissions from the region's upper-middle-class farmers as he made his way west through some decidedly rural territory. Untrained and lacking sophistication (his canvases are usually unprepared, his stretchers crude and homemade), Taylor, like any good portrait painter, was nonetheless able to capture something of the spirit of his subjects and was remarkably attuned to the latest trends of his era. In the present example depicting Harriet Perkins, for instance, Taylor dresses the figure in a fashionable high-waisted Empire gown and includes a tasseled curtain and column as background devices in the composition, all befitting the popular Classical tastes of his day. The inclusion of animals (birds, cats, dogs, squirrels) in his portraits is also not uncommon and, beyond mere symbolic import (Harriet holds a dove after all), may actually indicate something of the rural nature of his clients, whose lives would have been greatly influenced by their interaction with animals, not only as a result of their proximity to what was essentially wilderness but also as a result of their livelihood as farmers. 

The sitter for the present portrait, Harriet Elizabeth Perkins (1841-1917), was the daughter of Powhatan Perkins (1807-1885) and Elizabeth Meriwether Johnson (1807-1887). Harriet was born at "Wyndcroft" in Louisa County but was likely residing with her parents and five siblings at a newer home farther west in the county on Owens Creek at the time this portrait was taken. The original canvas bore a period inscription (recorded prior to relining) which read "H. E. Perkins / 3 years old last Oct. / March, 1845" and was discovered, along with two other Perkins family portraits, in the 1980s.

The appearance of the present work on the open market represents a rare opportunity to acquire a fine example from an important 19th-century Southern backcountry itinerant portrait painter.

Condition: Very good visual condition, conservation including relining and scattered minor to moderate inpainting to bird, background, and figure's face, chest, arm and dress.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $8,000-12,000

Price Realized: $9,360


AMERICAN SCHOOL (19TH CENTURY) PENNSYLVANIA LANDSCAPE PAINTING, OIL ON CANVAS, a fine panoramic depiction of an Italianate-style mansion and cultivated grounds, horse-drawn buggy and figures on road leading to house, large fountain in back, no signature located, on likely original canvas and stretchers, canvas bearing stenciled "J. J. GILLESPIE & CO. / PITTS. Pa" mark verso, frame also inscribed, in later hand, "GEDDES HOME / Skyehill (sic) River, PA". Housed in a modern frame. Mid 19th century. 28.5" x 48.5" sight, 32" x 52" OA.

Provenance: From a private Connecticut collection.

Condition: Scattered abrasions and minor areas of paint loss, several punctures/tears to canvas affecting landscape and sky.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $500-800

Price Realized: $5,557.50


DEBORAH ANN HEMING (NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY, 1810-1850) PICTORIAL NEEDLEWORK SAMPLER, silk on linen, a dynamic composition featuring a depiction of the iconic vessel, USS Enterprise, along with a perched bird, upper and lower decorative panels, stylized flowering border, and seminal verse "A Rainbow at night is a Sailor's Delight / A Rainbow in the morning is a sailor's warning", signed "Deborah Ann Heming's work / Aged 10 years / 1820". Housed in a modern frame. Circa 1820. 16.5" x 15.25" sight, 24.75" x 23" OA.

Provenance: From a private Virginia collector.

Catalogue Note: Deborah Ann Heming (1810-1850) was the daughter of Melsup Heming (1778-1832) and Rebecca Ludlum (1776-1831). Born in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, she may have worked this needlework at a nearby academy. She may also have worked this piece in New York City, as her father, Melsup, is recorded in 1815 as a "shipmaster" in the city.

Condition: Overall toning, fading, and some areas of staining/discoloration. Sits loose in frame.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $500-800

Price Realized: $7,605


BENJAMIN CHANDLEE (NOTTINGHAM PA / MD, 1723-1791) CARVED CHERRY TALL-CASE CLOCK, eight-day brass works, brass face with second dial and calendar wheel, Roman numerals for hours, and Arabic numerals for minutes, all hand-engraved, applied open-work brass spandrels bordering the face, and matching brackets flanking a boss inscribed "B. Chandlee / Nottingham". Hood with broken-arch pediment terminating in spool-form turnings, above tombstone door flanked by turned columns, tombstone windows to each side of hood, case having tombstone door with rectangular face featuring applied corners, flanked by fluted quarter columns, above plinth base with fluted corner columns, raised on ball feet. Original weights and pendulum present. Excellent dry historical surface. Circa 1760. 92.5" HOA, 18.75" W, 10.5" D.

Provenance: Descended in the collection the southern Pennsylvania/Maryland (Chester Co. area) family, and recently purchased directly from the family.

Condition: Very good condition overall, lacking second face hand, split to proper left side of hood, restoration to waist door, some wear to molding at base of plinth, likely from a pet gnawing. Not currently in working condition.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $3,000-5,000

Price Realized: $19,890


ROCKINGHAM CO, SHENANDOAH VALLEY OF VIRGINIA, PUNCHED-TIN-PANELED PAINT-DECORATED YELLOW PINE AND POPLAR PIE / FOOD SAFE, twelve-tins, the rectangular one-board top with applied edge molding over two hinged doors within scratch-beaded surround concealing two fixed shelves, all raised on tall ring-turned legs, tin pattern featuring central fylfot flanked by distinctive elongated corner fans. Retains likely original paint-decorated surface. Mid 19th century. 59.25" H, 39.75" W, 18" D.

Provenance: From a Shenandoah Co., VA Collection.

Condition: Very good overall visual condition with minor areas of surface wear. Several repairs to moldings with associated touch-up to paint. Hinges replaced on one door with associated pieced repairs.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $6,435


VERMONT PAINT-DECORATED BASSWOOD DOCUMENT BOX, unusual domed, paneled hinged lid with applied moldings, above the lap-joined case with applied base moldings, original cabinet lock. Original dark mustard-painted surface with abstract wiped and sponged decorations. First half 19th century. 9.75" H, 12.375" x 7" case.

Provenance: From the collection of Sean & Patricia Skinner, Sarasota, FL.

Purchased from David Good, 2008.

Condition: Very good condition with several small touch-ups to paint scuffs, old replaced hinges, expected wear.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $200-300

Price Realized: $2,457


AMERICAN TOLEWARE DOME-TOP DOCUMENT BOX, retaining original polychrome-painted floral devices and bright chrome yellow stylized decoration against a japanned ground, hinged lid with original bail and hasp. Second quarter 19th century. 7.5" H, 10" W, 6.25" D.

Top worn with minor dent, otherwise very good with minor scattered wear and discoloration.

Provenance: From a private Virginia collector.

Condition: Top worn with minor dent, otherwise very good with minor scattered wear and discoloration.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $100-200

Price Realized: $819


SIGNED W. HEYSER, CHAMBERSBURG PENNSYLVANIA WROUGHT-IRON AND BRASS HEARTH ARTICLES, LOT OF TWO, comprising a ladle and a strainer with brass bowls, matching wrought-iron handles with curled extension, impressed "W. HEYSER / CHAMBG". Together with a spatula with similar matching handle. Three pieces total. 18.5" Long, spatula 16.875" Long.

Provenance: From a Virginia private collection; discovered in the Shenandoah Valley.

Condition: Excellent condition with expected wear. Spatula with possible repair to rivets.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $100-200

Price Realized: $1,989


STAFFORDSHIRE TRANSFER-PRINTED AMERICAN HISTORICAL CERAMIC FOOTED BOWL / URN, having two molded handles on opposite sides and raised foot with flared rim, "BELLVILLE / ON THE PASSAIC RIVER" on exterior in dark blue transfer design as printed on base and "Pine Orchard House, Catskill Mountains" printed on interior of the hotel built in 1823 in Hudson, New York. Pattern mark includes an eagle with American shield and banner reading "E PLURIBUS UNUM" otherwise unmarked. Likely Enoch Wood & Sons, Burslem, Staffordshire, England. Circa 1830. 5,3125" H, 10.625" D.

Literature: Transferware Collectors Club database patterns #3006 and #2005.

Provenance: From the collection of Kurt O' Hare and Barbara O' Hare, Putnam Valley, NY

.

Catalogue Note: (UPDATED 6/16/17) This is an unrecorded form for both patterns. The Transferware Collectors Club Database notes the following regarding the Passaic River design: "Belleville has been called the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution in America, since the first steam engine operated in this country was used to pump out the flooded Schuyler copper mines here in 1755. Nicholas Roosevelt, great uncle to Theodore Roosevelt, later ran a concern that manufactured modern steam engines in Belleville. Working for Robert Fulton and Robert Livingston, in 1811 Roosevelt built the steamboat New Orleans in Pittsburgh, which became the first steam powered vessel to navigate the Ohio River to the Mississippi and thence down to its namesake city."

Condition: Excellent visual condition with professional restoration to crack off rim, foot, and handles.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $6,435


ENGLISH SPATTERWARE POLYCHROME CERAMIC TEABOWL AND SAUCER SET, having blue and yellow sponged enamels on exterior of teabowl and interior of saucer. Unmarked. Staffordshire and other areas. Circa 1830. Cup 2.125" H, saucer 5.875" D.

Provenance: From a California estate collection.

Condition: Light radial hairline on base of saucer and several small flakes on rim of teabowl. Foot rim of saucer with one minor flake that is likely from manufacturing as it is triangulated from kiln furniture.

Sold at Jeffrey S. Evans Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $80-120

Price Realized: $2,457


ENGLISH STAFFORDSHIRE EARTHWORM MOCHA MUG, ca. 1825; multi-colored earthworm design on a tan band bracketed by dark brown rings, tooled green rim with dark brown edge and a molded strap handle with acanthus terminals, 3.75"d, 4.875"h;

Condition: Good.

Sold at Horst Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $100-300

Price Realized: $550


12 EARLY ADAMS ROSE CUPS AND SAUCERS, ca. 1825; English Staffordshire pearlware handleless cups and saucers all with indented rims and many saucers impressed "Adams" on reverse.

Condition: Cup- (4) .25" to .1125" rim flakes; Saucers- (6) with .25" & smaller foot ring flakes.

Sold at Horst Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $100-300

Price Realized: $550


HANDWROUGHT CONESTOGA WAGON HOUND BAND, ca. 1881; tool decorated and dated hound band with owner's initials "I.M." and date "1881" with tool decoration of four stars in corners and flowers in middle and band also embossed "I.R." (initials of maker), 10"x 4.5"x 4";

Condition: Band possibly earlier than date - date may have been added in 1881.

Sold at Horst Auctions June 17, 2017.

Estimate: $200-400

Price Realized: $270


(EARLY REFERENCE) 2 VOLS. WEBSTER, NOAH. AN AMERICAN DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. New York: S. Converse, 1828. First edition. 4to, original cloth-backed boards; dust soiled, edges heavily worn, some blistering to boards, cloth spine of vol. 1 fraying and detaching, cloth of vol. 2 spine a little frayed at ends but intact. Frontispiece portrait, tissue guard. Frontispiece detached, moderately toned and foxed, fore edge-side blank margin of portrait often dampstained, minor damp spotting to title pages and front blanks, internally generally clean - scattered light foxing, a few quires lightly toned. Untrimmed, leaf size 12 x 9.5 inches; 304 x 240 mm, or slightly smaller. With separately issued 4to "Advertisement" leaf, distinct from the "advertisement" comprising leaves G3 and G4 of vol. 1, and showing no thread holes. 

The first edition of the first unabridged American dictionary of the English language.

Sold at Freeman's Auction June 16, 2017.

Estimate: $5,000-8,000

Price Realized: $8,125


(EARLY ETHNOGRAPHY) 1 PORTFOLIO. EDEN, EMILY. PORTRAITS OF THE PRINCES & PEOPLE OF INDIA. London: J. Dickinson, 1844. Folio, loose as issued, in contemporary pebbled burgundy cloth portfolio; worn and frayed, one flap detached, ties mostly intact. Holding: hand colored lithographic title mounted on card and 28 hand colored lithographic plates, heightened with gum-arabic, on 24 card mounts with watercolor borders ruled by hand, and with letterpress titles and captions on paper sheets mounted to the verso of each of the 24 card mounts. All drawn on stone by Lowes Dickinson after Emily Eden. Plates generally clean, mounts often spotted, dust smudged and a little worn at edges. Mounts approximately 21.875 x 17.5 inches; 556 x 445 mm. Ex-library: perforated stamp at bottom right of title mount, ink stamp and pencil notations on mount of plate 1. See expanded condition report. 

Emily Eden, 1797-1869, accompanied her brother, George, Lord Auckland, to India where he served as Governor-General from 1835-1842. Eden recorded her observations of India in letters and sketches. On her return to England in 1842, Eden arranged to have her images printed in the portfolio above, her letters were published in 1866, Up the Country. Letters written to her Sister from the Upper Provinces of India by the Hon. Emily Eden.

Sold at Freeman's Auction June 16, 2017.

Estimate: $12,000-18,000

Price Realized: $16,250


(NATURALIA) 1 VOL. ALLEN, JOHN FISK. VICTORIA REGINA; OR THE GREAT WATER LILY, BOSTON, 1854. Folio, original cloth-backed printed boards; back strip detaching, boards worn and blistered, losses at bottom corners. With 6 chromolithographic plates. Losses at bottom fore edges and to plate and text margins, chromolithographic surfaces of plates intact, text leaves toned, guard sheets often torn and defective. Ex-library: perforated stamp at imprint of title page and bottom of Index, ink stamp at foot of dedication page. See expanded condition report. Sold with all faults. 

Nissan 16; Bennett page 2; Reese 19, "One of the most striking of American botanical books, this is also among the most successful examples of early chromolithography." 

Sold at Freeman's Auction June 16, 2017.

Estimate: $5,000-8,000

Price Realized: $13,750


AMERICAN AUTOGRAPHS: PRESIDENTIAL) 1 PIECE. LETTER SIGNED. ADAMS, JOHN. STATE HOUSE, PHILADELPHIA, SEPTEMBER 5, 1777. 1 page, folio, integral address leaf; expert paper repairs to integral leaf, Tomlinson Collection ink stamp on integral leaf, creasing along old folds, minor dust smudging, docketed. To "The Deputy Master General - Northern Department, [regarding a Congressional resolve] We request you to give us the fullest information you can..." Also signed by Richard Henry Lee (signer of the Declaration of Independence from Virginia) and by Henry Laurens (then President of the Continental Congress). The body of this letter is in Laurens' hand; the letter bears Laurens' free frank on its integral leaf. Body of letter and signatures clear and generally strong. In custom quarter morocco and marbled boards folding case. 

Sold at Freeman's Auction June 16, 2017.

Estimate: $5,000-8,000

Price Realized: $17,500


(NATIVE AMERICANA: HISTORICAL PRINTS) 1 PIECE. MEZZOTINT ENGRAVING. (Bowles, John, publisher). Simon, John after Verelst, Jan. "Sa Ga Yeath Qua Pieth Tow, King of the Maquas." London, (ca. 1750). 13 7/8 x 10 inches; 352 x 254 mm. Top and sides trimmed to image, title and imprint below image present, engraver's name below image torn away, a few small chips and close tears in image, moderately toned and mounted to somewhat later sheet. One of "The Four Indian Kings" Bowles' mezzotints. 

Sold at Freeman's Auction June 16, 2017.

Estimate: $500-800

Price Realized: $10,625


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