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ADJUSTABLE WROUGHT IRON CHAMBERSTICK, 18th century, with spike for hanging, D-shaped drip pan, and ratcheted push-up mechanism, (small worn hole on drip pan), ht. 6, dia. 7.75 in.

Sold at Skinner Auction March 2, 2014.

Estimate: $300-500

Price Realized: $441


FEDERAL MAHOGANY INLAID DEMILUNE CARD TABLE, attributed to Thomas and Samuel Goddard, Newport, Rhode Island, late 18th century, the string-inlaid top on conformingly inlaid apron joining square tapering legs topped by urns above bellflowers, with ivory dots, (minor restoration), ht. 28.25, wd. 35.75, dp. 17.75 in.

Sold at Skinner Auction March 2, 2014.

Estimate: $1,500-2,500

Price Realized: $10,455


PAUL REVERE, JR. (BOSTON, 1734-1818), PORTRAIT OF MAJOR JOHN PITCAIRN ON HORSEBACK. Signed"P. Revere del.” l.r., and inscribed "Major John Pitcairn” in the same hand l.r., both outside of the border. Watercolor on laid paper, 6 1/2 x 5 in., with applied marbled paper border in a period molded giltwood frame. Condition: Toning, light creases, minor foxing.

Provenance: According to typed inscriptions applied to the back of the frame the painting came from the estate of Duncan Phyfe, grandson of the late cabinet maker and from whom he inherited the painting.

Note: Major John Pitcairn, A Scottish-born officer in the British Marines, was sent to Boston in late 1774 with 600 marines under his command to help quell the unrest which had been brewing in the colonies. Taxation by the British Parliament, and events such as the "Boston Massacre" in March of 1770, had helped fuel the colonists' fire. A

Although unsympathetic to the Provincial cause, Pitcairn endeared himself to the people he dealt with during the conflict by organizing civic improvements, and by showing fairness, consideration, and courtesy in settling disputes between the civilians and the military. He even won the respect of rebel colonist Paul Revere and his neighbor, an anti-British tailor named Samuel Shaw, at whose North End home Pitcairn was billeted at when martial law was imposed in Boston. It is reported that Pitcairn hosted social events at Shaw's house in which he invited British officers and opposing locals, including Revere, to meet and exchange their views in a civilized manner. It is likely that during this time of close proximity that Revere, with his engraver's eye for detail, may have executed this small and possibly unique portrait of Pitcairn on horseback.

On the night of April 18th, 1775, Pitcairn volunteered to join British forces under Lt. Col. Smith on the expedition to Concord, a small town about 18 miles from Boston. For some time, colonists had been accumulating supplies in Concord to form an army, and the illegal Provincial Congress had also been meeting in the town. Pitcairn was made second-in-command, and placed at the head of the column. At dawn, Pitcairn reached the center of Lexington, where armed men had formed. The soldiers at the front of the column marched onto the green, and Pitcairn ordered the Lexington men to disperse. A shot rang out, and the men fired, killing eight and wounding another ten. Pitcairn's horse was wounded two times during the exchange of fire. The scenario wasn't much better in Concord, with most of the supplies being removed from the town prior to the arrival of the British. More blood was shed at the north bridge by an attack of the Provincials, and as the British where marching back to Boston, they were attacked from all sides, barely making it back to the safety of Boston at nightfall.

On June 17th, 1775, two months after the ill-fated expedition to Concord, British troops where again formed, this time to attack the Provincial army which had dug fortifications on the slope of Breed's Hill in Charlestown. Three bloody assaults were made, and on the last Pitcairn fell, mortally wounded. Major John Pitcairn died at the age of 52 and is buried in the crypt of Christ Church (the "Old North Church") in Boston.

Sold at Skinner Auction March 2, 2014.

Estimate: $20,000-30,000

Price Realized: $39,975


CARVED WALNUT AND WALNUT VENEER INLAID HIGH CHEST OF DRAWERS, possibly Joseph Davis, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, c. 1735-50, the carved scrolled cresting above the double-arch molded two-part case of eleven drawers bordered by stringing and double herringbone banding, all flanked by reeded and stop-fluted columns topped with acanthus carving, all on cabriole legs joining shaped skirt with applied bead centering a carved fan, refinished, replaced brasses, (alterations and restoration), ht. without finial 82, case wd. 43.75, case dp. 24 in. Note: For a related piece of furniture see Skinner American Furniture and Decorative Arts, March 6, 2011, Sale 2538B, Lot 56.

Sold at Skinner Auction March 2, 2014.

Estimate: $10,000-15,000

Price Realized: $14,760
FRAMED FRAKTUR BIRTH CERTIFICATE, by Rev. Henry Young (American, 1792-1861), Centre County, Pennsylvania, 1844, watercolor and ink on paper depicting a young husband and wife with clasped hands and a bouquet of flowers, and a tripod table between them, with ink inscriptions commemorating the birth of John Hirem Gentsel, on June 26, 1844, 12 x 7 1/2 in., in a molded wood frame, (light toning and foxing, old creases, minor tears and edge loss).

Provenance: Retains a paper label from the American Folk Art Gallery, New York.

Sold at Skinner Auction March 2, 2014.

Estimate: $4,000-6,000

Price Realized: $15,990


PAINT-DECORATED TINWARE DOME TOP TRUNK, America, early 19th century, with wire swing handle on the lid painted with a foliate chain border in yellow, the sides decorated with red, yellow, and green flowers and yellow pinwheel devices on a black ground, (scattered paint loss), ht. 6.75, wd. 6, lg. 9.25 in.

Sold at Skinner Auction March 2, 2014.

Estimate: $600-800

Price Realized: $1,107


PAINT DECORATED LEATHER FIRE BUCKET, America, c. 1810, the bucket with polychrome decoration depicting a stylized flower and scrolled leaves with "EBEN. FRANCIS” inscribed on a banner over the inscription ”A.F.S./1810" on a red-painted ground with black collar and red painted swing handle, with two indistinct impressed manufacturer's names on either side of the back seam, (imperfections), ht. to top of collar 12.5 in.

Sold at Skinner Auction March 2, 2014.

Estimate: $1,500-2,500

Price Realized: $6,150


SET OF TWELVE FEDERAL CARVED MAHOGANY SHIELD BACK DINING CHAIRS, attributed to Thomas Burling or Robert Carter, New York, c. 1790, consisting of two armchairs and ten sides, the molded crests above reeded and "fish-scale" carved splats converging at a petal-carved lunette, on overupholstered shaped seats on square tapering front legs ending in spade feet, the two armchairs with shaped arms with rosette-carved terminals on concave supports, old surface, (some repairs), ht. 38.5, seat ht. 17 in.

Note: Similar chairs are in prominent public collections, including Winterthur, the Smithsonian, Yale University, and Boscobel.

There is some speculation that both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson owned large sets of similar chairs made by Thomas Burling, based on historical records that show substantial payments by each of those men to Burling in 1790.

Sold at Skinner Auction March 2, 2014.

Estimate: $25,000-35,000

Price Realized: $39,975


MINIATURE BLUE PAINTED COVERED FIRKIN, Edmund Hersey, Hingham, Massachusetts, 19th century, stave and lapped bentwood hoop-constructed container joined with copper tacks, with conforming cover impressed with the maker's initials ”ELH," with pegged swing handle, (minor loss), ht. 2.25, ht. to top of upright handle 3.25 in.

Sold at Skinner Auction March 2, 2014.

Estimate: $3,000-5,000

Price Realized: $8,610


MIDWESTERN, MID 19TH CENTURY PIE SAFE, cherry. Dovetailed gallery over two doors with three punched tin panels. Older refinish. 56"h. 44.5"w. 20"d.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $400-800

Price Realized: $1,440


SANDPAPER DRAWING (PROBABLY AMERICAN SCHOOL, MID 19TH CENTURY), Charcoal on sandpaper, unsigned. Two dwellings, both with an abundance of tall shuttered windows. In old, if not original, frame, 21.5"h. 26.5"w.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $300-600

Price Realized: $1,046


BUCKET BENCH, AMERICAN 19TH CENTURY, pine. Scrolled back with two upper drawers over two lower paneled doors, and old red paint. 49.5"h. 39"w. 15.5"d. Missing latch on proper left door; cleaned down to original red paint; warp to the back splash; expected wear.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $3,480


HUTCH TABLE, AMERICAN EARLY 19TH CENTURY, poplar. Scrubbed two-board top over a bench base with shaped ends and old brown paint. 27.5"h. 77.25"w. 33.25"d. Period but mismatched pins.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $2,400


CARVED POWDER HORN, AMERICAN, 1ST HALF 19TH CENTURY, elaborately carved with buildings, boats, birds, insects, animals, and a mermaid. Turned wooden plug. Imperfections. 14"l. Sold at Skinner, November 2008, lot 910.

For another horn likely by the same carver, see Rafael Osona Auctions (Massachusetts), August 2007, lot 141.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $1,000-1,500

Price Realized: $1,800


MICHIGAN JACQUARD COVERLET, woven by Abram William Van Doren, Avon, Oakland County, 1845, wool and cotton. Double weave coverlet, rose and dark blue on natural. Pairs of birds in a tree with the inscription ”Michigan". Signed corner block includes client, "Marsha Smith Bo(rn) 1794". 80"x 82".

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $1,000-2,000

Price Realized: $1,200


HABERDASHER'S TRADE SIGN, AMERICAN, 2ND HALF 19TH CENTURY, iron. Top hat with old blue paint, in a period wrought iron mount. 20"h. 51"w.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $400-800

Price Realized: $1,800


DRY SINK, AMERICAN, 19TH CENTURY, pine. High back over three drawers over two paneled doors. Retains old grey-blue paint. Imperfections. 45"h. 47.5"w. 19"d. Traces of old red and yellow paint with some flaking and expected wear; split to both side boards near the top; missing two drawer pulls; some replaced back boards.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $400-800

Price Realized: $2,880


DECORATED TREENWARE CONTAINER, AMERICAN, MID 19TH CENTURY. Bold vinegar sponging in red and blue on a mustard ground. Chip and age splits. 12"h.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $900-1,200

Price Realized: $3,600


CUPBOARD, AMERICAN, 19TH CENTURY, pine. One-piece cupboard with two double-paneled doors, interior shelves, shaped feet, and old yellow paint. 67"h. 41"w. 18"d. Yellow paint over green with old dark blue paint on the interior. Nicks and wear with loss to the edges of the boards near the two latches. bottom door knob is replaced along with the bottom latch. Front right foot has missing piece of wood and there are small pieces missing from both corners of the cornice.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $3,360


DRY SINK, AMERICAN, 19TH CENTURY, poplar. Well with overhanging side drawer over two paneled doors, and retaining old yellow paint. 38.5"h. 46"w. 19.5"d. Heavy varnish under yellow paint; expected wear; tack holes around top perimeter from original liner.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $350-700

Price Realized: $2,640


STEPBACK CUPBOARD, AMERICAN, 1ST HALF 19TH CENTURY, pine. Two-piece cupboard: the upper section with two six-pane doors, the lower section with two drawers over two doors, all on bracket feet. Retains old red paint. 77"h. 49"w. 17"d. Red paint is over traces of black and slate blue paint with areas of wear down to the bare wood. Pieced repairs to the left facing cornice, back corners.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $350-700

Price Realized: $2,640


DRY SINK, AMERICAN, 19TH CENTURY, poplar and pine. Oversized dovetailed well over two paneled doors flanked by small drawers, all on turned feet. Old red paint. 37"h. 60"w. 23"d. Old paint, tack holes on the well sides from a lining (now gone), interior of well has age cracks and wear most likely had a bored that ran the width of the well to separate the sink, the left side has a covered drain hole that runs behind the proper left drawer, the back and bottom of the drawer has been replaced most likely do to moister, back board and underside have pieced repair. back feet appear to have been replaced.

Sold at Garth's Auction on March 15, 2014.

Estimate: $800-1,600

Price Realized: $4,200


DUTCH DELFT POLYCHROME "PEACOCK" PATTERN PLATE, DE VERGULDE BLOEMPOT, 18TH CENTURY, painted in ochre, green, blue and brown stylized vase of flowers and peacock feathers, the rim with a border of "butterflies" alternating with flowerheads on a tight scroll ground, initials "BP" in brown enamel. Diameter 9.25 inches.

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $300-500

Price Realized: $600


DUTCH DELFT BLUE AND WHITE PEACOCK PATTERN CHARGER, DE PORCELEYNE CLAEUW, MID-LATE 18TH CENTURY, POSSIBLY LAMBERTUS SANDERUS, painted with a stylized vase of flowers and peacock feathers, the ochre-edged rim with a border of butterflies alternating with flowerheads on a tight scroll ground, claw mark and numeral 300/6 in underglaze-blue. Diameter 14 inches

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $500-700

Price Realized: $780


NEW ENGLAND CHIPPENDALE TIGER MAPLE CHEST-ON-CHEST, CIRCA 1790, In two parts; the upper section with applied cove molding above two short over three long graduated drawers, the lower section with three long graduated drawers, raised on a molded base and ogee bracket feet. Height 5 feet 9.5 inches, width 42.5 inches, depth 20 inches.

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $3,000-5,000

Price Realized: $10,800


MASSACHUSETTS CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY DIMINUITVE DROP-LEAF BREAKFAST TABLE, SALEM-MARBLEHEAD AREA, CIRCA 1780, The rectangular top and square drop-leaves above a shaped apron, raised on cabriole legs ending in ball-and-claw feet. Height 27 inches, length (closed) 35 inches, width 13.25 inches.

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $6,000-9,000

Price Realized: $9,120


CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY WING CHAIR, CIRCA 1780, PROBABLY MASSACHUSETTS. The canted back with serpentine crest and wings above scrolled arms, an upholstered seat and loose seat cushion, raised on square molded legs joined by a recessed stretcher.

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $9,000


PAIR OF STENCILED AND PAINTED TIN SINGLE-LIGHT CANDLE SCONCES, each gilt oval backplate within a crimped edge and surrounded by a geometric, floral and bellflower border. Height 14 inches. (One illustrated).

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $250-4500

Price Realized: $780


THE GARDNER FAMILY RARE MASSACHUSETTS QUEEN ANNE WALNUT SMALL TRAY-TOP TABLE, SALEM AREA, CIRCA 1760. The rectangular dish top within a molded edge above a frieze with cyma-curved scalloped edges on the front and sides, the back of straight outline, the whole raised on delicate tapering cabriole legs ending in pad feet. Retaining an early, if not original surface. Height 25.375 inches, width 29.875 inches, depth 20.75 inches.In Colonial America the most important room in most homes was a living-dining room, which was furnished with drop-leaf tables and chairs that could be moved from the center of the room to the walls when not being used for dining. Few families were wealthy enough to own a china table, whose sole purpose was to hold tablewares for a variety of tea or dinner courses and which would have been positioned against a wall. This piece is a rare survival of such a table. The table's first owner, the merchant Samuel Gardner, whose house stood at the corner of Essex and Cromby Streets, was the richest man in Salem by the late 1760's. The table remained in his family for almost two and a half centuries until sold by Northeast Auctions in 2003.The beautiful cyma-curves on the front and sides are elegantly carved, while the back retains the straight line of its original design, reflecting its intended use as a side table. Because early twentieth century collectors placed these tables in the open using them in front of sofas, many dealers had the back apron carved to match the front and sides, leaving few in original condition.

Provenance: Descended from Samuel Gardner (1712/3-1769) of Salem, Massachusetts to his daughter, Elizabeth Gardner Bridges (1750-1834); to her son, Henry Gardner Bridges (1789-1849); to his daughter, the artist Fidelia Bridges (1834-1923); to her cousin, Josephine Tillinghast Chadwick Smith (1866-1941); to her son, Philip Horton Smith (1890-1960); to his wife, Elinor C. M. Smith (1909-2003) and her estate; Northeast Auctions, August 3, 2003, lot 729; to the present owner.

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $20,000-40,000

Price Realized: $25,200


RARE NEW ENGLAND CHILD'S GREEN-PAINTED SACK BACK WINDSOR ARMCHAIR, LATE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY, in old paint, with vase-and-ring-turned supports and a bulbous-turned H-form stretcher.

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $2,000-4,000

Price Realized: $7,500


JACOB FORSTER-LABELED CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY CHEST OF DRAWERS, CHARLESTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS, 1786-1790. The reverse-serpentine and blocked top with molded edge above four graduated long drawers, on a molded base and cabriole legs ending in ball-and-claw feet. The brasses appear to be original, the top drawer with label printed "Jacob Forster, Cabinet Maker, Charlestown, Massachusetts." Height 33.5 inches, width 40.25 inches, depth 21.5 inches.

Provenance: Israel Sack, Inc. New York; Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Taradash, Ardsley-on-Hudson, New York; Israel Sack Inc., New York; Sotheby's, New York, "Selections from Israel Sack, Inc.," January 20, 2002; a private collector.

Literature: Israel Sack, Inc., "American Antiques from Israel Sack Collection," vol. VII, pp. 1934-45, p. 5290; Israel Sack, Inc., "Celebrating Our 90th. Anniversary," 1993, p. 47, p. 5290.

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $20,000-40,000

Price Realized: $21,600


PORTRAIT OF FOUR CHILDREN OF THE DANIEL FAMILY, NEEDHAM, MASSACHUSETTS, CIRCA 1835-36. ATTRIBUTED TO ALVAN FISHER (AMERICAN 1792-1863). Depicted are Pamela (b. 1826), Cornelia (b. 1829), Josiah Ellery (b. 1831) and Elizabeth (b. 1834), the children of Josiah and Pamela Selby Daniel. A checklist of paintings maintained by Alvan Fisher records portraits of the elder Daniels in an entry for January 1833. Oil on canvas, 48 x 42 inches.

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $9,000-15,000

Price Realized: $9,000


SCRIMSHAW IVORY AND BALEEN- INLAID MAHOGANY DESK BOX, EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY. The scalloped divided shelf with well and inlaid with a star and diamond device beneath a turned ivory finial, above a drawer inlaid to simulate two drawers, the sides similarly inlaid, raised on bun feet. Height 9.625 inches, width 11.5 inches, depth 5.75 inches.

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $500-700

Price Realized: $3,360


ROBERT SALMON (AMERICAN 1775-1858). SHIP AT ANCHOR OFF A COAST AT DAY'S END, oil on board, 13.25 x 19.25 inches. Signed and dated "R.S. 1827" l.r. The reverse inscribed "No. 541/ Painted by Robert Salmon/ 1827."

Literature: Listed in Salmon's Catalogue of Paintings as reproduced in John Wilmerding, "Robert Salmon: Painter of Ship & Shore,” 1971, Appendix A, p. 90.

Sold at Northeast Auction March 22-23, 2014.

Estimate: $9,000-15,000

Price Realized: $21,600


STAFFORDSHIRE LIONS, pair of early Staffordshire seated lions, with orange spotted lambs underneath, fine color detail and condition, 10" h, 7" l, (ex. Archibald estate, Powder Point, Duxbury, MA).

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions March 29, 2014.

Estimate: $200-400

Price Realized: $2,478


BOSTON BLOCK FRONT CHEST, rare 18th c. Boston block front chest of drawers, mahogany, shaped and molded top, four graduated drawers with original Christmas tree brasses, bracket base with central drop pendant, old repair label pasted twice inside top drawer and on back inside "E.A. Husbener & Co., Dorchester, repaired & polished Feb 6 1901", owner Dr. J. Lombard, descended in the Lombard family of Scituate, purchased from the family of Mrs. Sarah Stillings of Portsmouth, NH, who owned the bureau in 1824 or 1825 when Gen. Lafayette was their overnight guest, (glue block is in the drawer), 30 1/2" h, 33 1/4" w, 18" d, minor imperfections, brass is 3 1/2" h, 4 3/4" w, includes framed notarized document dated 1901, (ex. Dr. Lombard estate, Scituate, MA).

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions March 29, 2014.

Estimate: $15,000-20,000

Price Realized: $73,160


VERY RARE TIN CHANDELIER, New England, two-tier, wrought iron hook over a 6 1/2" double cone with six upright tin strip branches, each with a saucer based candle holder, in original blue paint over a larger 10" double cone with eight upright tin strip branches, terminating in saucer based candle holders in original green paint, and with a small wrought iron loop on the base, (Note: one candle holder is missing on top tier, otherwise in good condition), 24" overall h, 17-18" span of lower tier branch, (ex. Curry collection).

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions March 29, 2014.

Estimate: $4,000-7,000

Price Realized: $3,540


CHERRY DESK ON STAND, 19th C, New England, slant lid, desk on stand, cherry, old refinish, inlaid mariner's compass rose star on lid, lipped drawer under with stamped oval brasses, original separate base with square tapered legs, banded cuffs, five-drawer interior, five cubbyholes, small dovetailed secret drawer (2" h, 6" l) hidden behind middle drawer, signed in pencil "John A. Brown, Albany, VT." and "$10,000 cash box" underneath, 29 1/2" writing h, (ex. Archibald estate, Powder Point, Duxbury, MA).

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions March 29, 2014.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $1,947


HUDSON RIVER PRIMITIVE OIL, 19th C, oil on canvas, labeled on back of top stretcher "American Harvesting, from the original painting...", Hudson River Valley scene, figures cutting hay, sailboats on river, gilded and carved frame, 24" x 36", (ex. Archibald estate, Powder Point, Duxbury, MA).

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions March 29, 2014.

Estimate: $1,000-2,000

Price Realized: $6,962


THREE VOLUME AUDUBON SET, Quadrupeds of North America, Audubon and Bochman, N.Y., George R. Lockwood, 1849, embossed leather, gilt edged marbled paper, interior colored plates, some interior foxing, bindings show edge wear, (ex. Archibald estate, Powder Point, Duxbury, MA).

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions March 29, 2014.

Estimate: $150-300

Price Realized: $3,186


18TH/19TH C. NEW ENGLAND HOURGLASS, pine, original blue painted finish on round top and bottom, traces of red on carved vertical columns, blown glass with medial leather binding, 6" h, 3 3/4" dia, (ex. Curry collection).

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions March 29, 2014.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $826


RARE 18TH C. DIMINUTIVE DESK, New England slant lid desk, maple and pine, old varnish finish, three dovetailed drawers with original brasses, three dovetailed drawer interior with six slots above, original bracket base, descended through the Solomon Lincoln family of Hingham, Mass., 25" h, 21.5" w, 15" d, 18" writing h.

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions March 29, 2014.

Estimate: $4.000-6,000

Price Realized: $9,440




IMPORTANT AND POSSIBLY UNIQUE LARGE SIZED STONEWARE PITCHER WITH INCISED DECORATION OF A STANDING LION, Manhattan, NY origin, possibly Crolius family, second half 18th century or early 19th century, two-gallon ovoid pitcher with heavily-tooled shoulder, narrow, tapering collar, and semi-rounded rim molding. Front of pitcher decorated with a large, deeply-incised design of a standing lion atop a stylized ground, filled with cobalt slip. Lion features a highly-unusual head-on stare with anthropomorphic face, bared teeth, and deeply-carved eyes. The figure is further embellished with a flowing mane, incised claws, and folky striped incising to the body, legs and long curling tail. From head-to-tail the lion measures an impressive 9" long. Handle decorated with brushed cobalt stripes and circles around the terminals. This significant recent discovery in early American stoneware is one of two pieces with incised lion decoration produced in Manhattan that we are aware of. The second example is a jar in the collection of Yale University, donated by John Paul Remensnyder in 1977. Few finely-incised pitchers from Manhattan are known to exist. This is the only example of the form we have seen with a figural motif other than a bird. The rare and visually-striking frontal view of the lion's face bears a striking similarity to incised owl or "catbird" decorations found on stoneware from the Northeastern U.S., in which the bird assumes a decidely human visage. Other printed images of animals from the 18th and 19th centuries depict animals with human-like faces, and it seems that this overall style may have been prevalent during the time period. The use of a lion decoration in early America is an interesting one, given the fact that the animal was a traditional symbol of Great Britain. This fact is likely one reason why this design is rarely found on early American stoneware, and why the Federal eagle was naturally so popular. As more and more understanding emerges, early stoneware from the Northeast continues to be pushed by scholars to earlier production periods. While ten years ago, dating a piece to the 1750-1775 time range might be a daunting task, it is now done with more regularity. This updated dating of stoneware offers the possibility that this pitcher may have been made prior to 1776, when America was still under British rule. Another very probable origin for this particular design is the popularity of animal shows and circuses during the period. Various traveling shows during the 18th and 19th centuries displayed rare exotic animals, which were considered great curiosities of their day. In many cases, the viewer had never seen the animal before, outside of prints and drawings. One specific lion was on display in several cities from at least 1791 to 1797, and was advertised over and over again in various American city papers, becoming something of a national celebrity. The August 31, 1796 issue of the New York City newspaper, The Minerva & Mercantile Evening Advertiser, referring to this lion, advertised, "To The Curious. A Beautiful AFRICAN Lion. To be seen everyday, Sundays excepted, ... in the Fields, next to the corner of Murray street in Broadway, where the proprietor has provided a cage in which the Lion moves at large ... ." It may have been the viewing of a creature at such an event that inspired the decoration on this pitcher, and the similarity of the woodcut that ran with the aforementioned ad to the design on this pitcher may be more than a coincidence. Certainly one of the most important discoveries in Manhattan stoneware of the past decade. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, which descended in a Brooklyn, NY family. Typical shallow, mostly small, chips to base. In-the-firing iron ping to reverse. Long shallow chip to left side of spout, either extremely old or an in-the-firing flaw. A second old chip to interior of rim on reverse. In-the-firing recessed spot on right side of pitcher. H 14".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 1, 2014,

Price Realized: $115,000


EXCEEDINGLY RARE AND IMPORTANT SALT GLAZED STONEWARE TEMPERANCE JUG WITH CIVIL WAR, SLAVERY, AND AMERICAN MOTIFS, Inscribed on Underside "From / Kirkpatrick / Anna Pottery / Anna / Union Co. / Ills.,” circa 1862, bulbous jug with tall neck and squared spout, the surface profusely-decorated with hand-modeled and molded figural designs and original polychrome paint. Jug includes a well-detailed bust of a Union Civil War soldier with goatee and kepi, emerging from the jug's shoulder, while being bitten by a snapping turtle. A second rear end of a man protrudes from the jug's opposite shoulder, superscored by the incised slogan "John L Patterson Going In”. Various references of men "going in" can be found on Anna Pottery temperance jugs, and are believed to be evocative of the evils of alcohol, which will essentially "trap" one inside the jug. A hand-modeled handle in the form of a snake extends through the neck of the jug, devouring a bearded figure on the front. This figure is executed with superb detail and depicts a gaunt man with dark hair and open mouth, including teeth and protruding tongue. Two additional small snakes encompass the figure's arms, which grasp the snake's head above. While this jug shows similar temperance themes to several other Anna examples known, another element emerges with its obvious references to the American Civil War. The depths of this imagery may never be fully extrapolated from the jug. However, it is possible that the central figure on this jug may represent Abraham Lincoln, with his country split in two between Union and Confederate sides. To further support this theory, the jug is decorated on one side with a molded and applied African-American man's face with incised details and hollowed nose, arguably representative of a Confederate side supportive of slavery. Free-swinging stoneware chainlinks connected at the spout, possibly unique to this temperance jug, are an addition that may have been functional, while also suggestive of the bonds of slavery. The opposing side of the jug features a large molded and applied spread-winged Federal eagle devouring a rabbit, which may be evocative of the Union. The center base of the jug features a molded and applied bust of a man drinking from a mug and smoking a pipe, a motif whose purpose is currently unknown. This design may simply be representative of embibers of alcohol and tobacco, which would typically drink from such a jug. The molded African-American head, the eagle, and this unusual drinking figure, have not been observed on any other Anna pieces, and may be unique to this example. The reverse left side of the jug includes a molded classical figure of a woman playing a lyre, a motif found on other Anna jugs of this period. The remainder of the jug includes two applied snakes, one of which slithers in and out of the jug's body, a third snake coiled around the handle, and a hand-modeled frog applied to the shoulder. Jug is incised on the underside with the signature "From / Kirkpatrick / Anna Pottery / Anna / Union Co. / Ills.”. The overall style of the jug links it to an important Anna Pottery jug with applied Civil War soldiers, made to commemorate a saloon brawl in Anna in 1862. The related Civil War jug was once part of the collection of the prominent New York City collector, Barry Cohen, and is the earliest dated Anna Pottery snake jug known, bearing the incised inscription on the underside "Kirkpatrick/ Anna Pottery / Anna Union Co / Illinois / January 17th, 1862 /Camp Dubois.” The similarities of the two jugs include their Civil War soldiers, molded classical woman motifs, and distinctly similar signatures on the underside. Both also feature early-style snakes, which appear less realistic and dangerous than those found on later Kirkpatrick renderings. Instead, the snakes' heads are narrow and somewhat whimsical-looking, lacking the severe, poison-glanded forms on their creations of the 1870s and 1880s. Clearly, the Kirkpatricks' obsession with snakes had only just begun. Another interesting feature of the jug is its hand-modeled frog figure, implying the jug was made before the Kirkpatricks were producing their popular molded frogs found on later inkwells, jugs, and other forms. This iconic vessel stands as one of a very few Anna Pottery temperance jugs with significance to the American Civil War. It is also a rare survivor from the Kirkpatricks first years of producing snake-decorated vessels, for which they have become so well-known. This jug ranks as the finest example of Anna Pottery to be offered anywhere in recent years. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market, previously-undocumented example, purchased by the consignor in Pennsylvania in the 1980s. Clasp broken near base, which assumedly once connected to the chainlinks on the left side of spout. Left leg of central figure reglued. Right leg with crude, old putty restoration. Additional putty restoration to small snake coiled around figure's left arm (with unrestored losses to same snake), head of turtle, and parts of smaller snake's body at base. Small snake coiled around large snake handle is missing tail. Anna Pottery temperance jug are typically found with in-the-firing damage to the applied decoration. It is possible that most or all of this damage occurred during the firing. H 10.25".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 1, 2014,

Price Realized: $69,000


EXCEEDINGLY RARE AND IMPORTANT LARGE SIZED REDWARE FETCHING DOG, ATTRIBUTED TO SOLOMON BELL, STRASBURG. VA, third quarter 19th century, hand-modeled figure of a dog in fetching stance, holding a basket of apples in its mouth. Figure features large lop ears, a curled tail, and outstretched paws, the surface embellished with heavily-incised fur. Surface covered in a lead glaze streaked with manganese over a light-orange ground. Interior stuffed with small pieces of clay, which cause the animal to rattle when shaken. Three original vent holes in underside. Figure includes distinctive impressed elliptical eyes with an additional arched impression forming an eyelid. This same impression can be found on a number of other animals attributed to the Bell Pottery in Strasburg, both serving as eyes and base decoration for the animals. Its finely-formed apple basket with impressed fruit is also a typical trait of many Bell family dogs, found on a number of Strasburg and Waynesboro examples. The figure's robust form and large size, aspects of its construction, as well as its distinctive face and glaze, are additionally all characteristics of animals carrying a Solomon Bell attribution. Many of these similarities can be noted in a standing bear, pair of cats, and dog with basket, pictured in H.E. Comstock's The Pottery of the Shenandoah Valley Region, pp. 232-233. To our knowledge, this figure is the only extant Bell redware dog exhibiting an upright, fetching stance. A significant recently discovery in hand-modeled Bell family redware. Literature: For other animals attributed to Solomon Bell, see Comstock, p. 232-233, fig. 5.89, 5.90, and 5.91. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, purchased by the consignor from Richard Flanders Smith approximately twenty-five years ago. Professional restoration to hairless sections of both front legs. Figure in otherwise excellent condition. Basket survives in untouched condition, a rarity among 19th century redware dog figures. H 6.5".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 1, 2014,

Price Realized: $19,550


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