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OVAL CARRIER, pine and maple, original orange painted finish, very finely shaped fixed hoop handle attached with five copper head tacks on both sides, two fingers, c. 1830-1840, found near Enfield, NH, 2 1/4? h (to rim), 6? h (to top of handle), 10.75? l, 8? d, (ex. Ed Clerk collection).

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$3,000-4,000

Price realized: $8,400


RARE SPIRIT LEAF GIFT MESSAGE, Blue ink on paper, painted green on one side and natural white on opposite, “A Word of Love and blessing from Abraham of Old, the Father of the Faithful To Eliza Sharp, June 12th, 1844…by Polly Ann Reed, (1818-1881), Shaker Sister, Visionist and Artist, New Lebanon, N.Y. c. 1844?, slight creasing, two small dents at bottom left edge under stars, otherwise very good condition, 6.75? l, 3.75” w.

Note: Other similar leaf cutouts dated June 12, 1844 are listed in Daniel W. Patterson Gift Drawing and Gift Song, 1983, United Society of Shakers, Sabbathday Lake, Maine, see pages 82 and 83.

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$10,000-20,000

Price realized: $15,000


RARE SMALL SPIRITUAL BOOKLET, Aqua green colored cover, with the edges of the pages and the inside covers tinted chrome yellow, and blue ink on white paper, “A Farewell Word or Parting notice from our Heavenly Parents to Eliza Sharp January 7th 1842.”, with words from Father James, Mother Ann, Father William, Elder Sister Olive, Mother Lucy, “And says Father Joseph I have a present too; it is a Cluster of Fine Grapes and a Box of Raisins: this I present to Eliza Mother's dutiful child with my love and blessing says Father Joseph”, 28 pgs, excellent condition, 2.875? sq.

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$3,000-5,000

Price realized: $37,200


RARE ROUND BOX, Pine and maple, original bright red bittersweet painted finish, single lap secured with 12 copper head tacks pinned in a straight line, three copper tacks secure the rim lap, the bottom is painted red, excellent condition, Enfield, NH, c. 1850, faint pencil inscription under lid, believed to have been made by Elder Joseph Johnson (1781-1852) Enfield, N.H., (see Shaker Design, June Sprigg, pg. 111, #55, for a signed round box with the same dimensions and color), 3.75? h, 6? w, (ex. Don Emerich collection).

Note: This is one of the finest boxes of this rare style.

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$5,000-7,000

Price realized: $25,200


PAIL, Oak, old gray wash finish, two heavy iron bands riveted, tall extended ears with early handmade rope handle, originally a water pail, and reused as a corn carrier, marked “CORN” on side, c. 1820-40, 11? h (to top of ear), 10? dia.

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$1,500-2,500
Price realized: $2,760



OVAL BOX, Pine and maple, original dark olive green painted finish, three fingers, bottom is painted in original green, signed in ink under lid “Rowina Allen and Hannah C. Newell” (?), and “8 5-7? in yellow chalk, purchased from Hazel Hayes in 1975, Enfield, CT, 3.5? h, 8.75” l.

Note: Along with Ed Clerk, Hazel Hayes was one of the most respected Shaker antique dealers of the 1950-1990s.

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$1,000-2,000

Price realized: $6,300


FOUR SEED BOXES, Pine, original front paper labels, interiors with seed pack dividers, “Shakers Choice Garden Seeds, Mount Lebanon, N.Y.”, “Always produce Splendid Vegetables, Shaker Seed Co. D.M. Mount Lebanon, NY.”, one with replaced pine lid, 5? h, 22? l, 9.5? d.

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$2,000-4,000

Price realized: $5,400


RARE MEETING HOUSE BENCH, Birch and pine, traces of original red stained finish, canted back with 19 finely turned spindles on a shaped seat, on four turned and splayed legs, with turned side stretchers and rectangular front and back stretchers, Enfield, NH, c. 1830-1840, 34? h, 59? w, 13.75? d.

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$20,000-30,000

Price realized: $21,600


SISTER'S SEWING DESK, Butternut, pine secondary, varnish finish, two banks of three dovetailed drawers on upper section, small central cupboard with arched inset panel door, sliding breadboarded sewing surface, over three small drawers on left, three full-length dovetailed drawers on right side, original locks and key, inset panel ends on left, square tapered legs, thumbnail beaded, original porcelain knobs, 41.5? h, 31.5? w, 24? d, (ex. Edwin Hibarger collection; ex. Jonathan Wadleigh collection – purchased Willis Henry Shaker Auction, 2003, Lot 35).

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$20,000-30,000

Price realized: $24,000


TRESTLE DINING TABLE, Cherry and figured maple, old varnish finish, two board top, trestle base, through mortised stretcher, triple-pinned, mortise and tenon double-pinned arched foot, possibly Hancock, c. 1840, (sold at Willis Henry Shaker Auction, 1986, Lot 106), 28? h, 9' 1? l, 38? w.

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$40,000-60,000

Price realized: $84,000


RARE OVAL CARRIER, Maple, pine, bent hickory handle, original deep red stained finish on all surfaces, exceptional patina, four finely shaped fingers with symmetrically placed copper tacks, tagged in Ed Clerk's handwriting “Mt. Lebanon, NY Shaker carrier in completely original condition, c. 1840.”, (note: a classic Shaker oval carrier and one of the best), 8.5? h (to top of handle), 14? l, 10.5? w, (ex. Ed Clerk).

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$5,000-7,000

Price realized: $25,200


DOUBLE COVER OVER DRAWERS, Pine, early Meeting House blue painted finish over a light blue base coat, with additional blue paint finish enhancement added over the years, two vertical inset paneled doors, through mortised and double pinned on diagonal, sliding brass and iron spring loaded door closures, two-shelf interior over five drawer high double flanking drawers with single pulls, lipped, dovetailed and slightly graduated, originally built in on sides, simple baseboard, 6' 5? h, 5' 9? w, 24.5? d, (ex. Ed Clerk collection).

Note: This is an early Shaker double cupboard over drawers, and the only one we know in the blue painted color.

Sold at Willis Henry Auctions October 12, 2015.

Estimate:$20,000-30,000

Price realized: $67,200


WILLIAM BRADFORD (MASSACHUSETTS/CALIFORNIA, 1823-1892) BOSTON HARBOR, Signed and dated "Wm. Bradford/1859" on buoy at l.r.

Oil on Winsor & Newton artist board, 18 x 24 in., in likely original giltwood and gesso frame.

Condition: Localized retouch.

Provenance: Childs Gallery, 169 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 1951; purchased by the consignor's family from the above.

Exhibitions: National Sailors' Fair, Boston Athenaeum, Boston, Massachusetts, November 9-19, 1864; DeCordova Museum of Art, Lincoln, Massachusetts, November 2-December 28, 1969.

Note: Boston Harbor is a wonderful early example of Bradford's mature work, one in which the beginnings of his explorations of Luminism are on full view. Bright yellow-orange light from the setting sun puts the Boston skyline and the ships in the harbor in a grayscale silhouette, with a pale blue sky above. In the early 1860s, as Bradford further developed into the painter he is best known as, his popularity grew. A label affixed to the back of this painting speaks to that popularity. It indicates that this work was exhibited at the National Sailors' Fair, held in part at the Boston Athenaeum in 1864.

In that year, with the American Civil War still in full swing, Boston presented the Fair, an event of grand scale that would benefit veteran Navy men by, according to November 11th, 1864, account in the New York Times, "aid[ing] in the establishment of a Sailors' Home for Seamen and Mariners disabled in the naval service of their country." The celebration garnered attention country-wide. In that contemporary account, The Times wrote, "The fair itself is said to surpass anything yet held in Boston. Contributions of rare and costly articles, of arms and trophies, of models and designs, of everything, in short, that is attractive, interesting, showy or useful, crowd the tables, which are placed in every part of the grand edifice. The effect of the whole display is said to be magnificent."

Sold at Skinner Auctions October 25, 2015.

Estimate:$150,000-250,000

Price realized: $303,000


CLASSICAL CARVED MAHOGANY AND VENEER TABLE, Boston, c. 1820, the circular Egyptian marble top on a beaded apron over an acanthus carved, vase and ring-turned post, and four molded, outward-flaring legs with applied concentric ring bosses, ending in brass-capped casters, refinished, ht. 27.75, dia. 24 in.

Condition: Refinished. No major restoration or repair. The marble top appears original, and there is no evidence of any previous top (in fact the table is so well-built that it almost certainly was made to support the heavier top). Minor veneer patching.

Sold at Skinner Auctions October 25, 2015.

Estimate:$3,000-5,000

Price realized: $13,530


VICTOR DE GRAILLY (NEW YORK/FRANCE, 1804-1889), VIEW ON THE HUDSON, Signed and dated "De Grailly/1840” l.l., Oil on canvas, a figural group at foreground with paddlewheel steamer and sailboats beyond, Kosciuszko's monument visible on top of a ridge, 21.5 x 29 in., in a molded giltwood and gesso frame.

Condition: Relined, minor spots of retouch likely to address punctures.

Sold at Skinner Auctions October 25, 2015.

Estimate:$6,000-8,000

Price realized: $14,760


IMPORTANT AND PROBABLY UNIQUE SEVEN GALLON STONEWARE WATER COOLER, with Incised Federal Eagle Decoration, attributed to Henry Remmey, Sr. or Jr., Baltimore, MD, circa 1812-1829, large-sized, ovoid cooler with stepped bunghole and open handles featuring added supports, the surface lavishly-decorated with an incised and cobalt-highlighted Federal eagle design. The eagle closely follows the Federal style with a spread-winged stance and shield across its chest, its talons clutching olive branches and arrows. The body includes profuse, deep incising to the feathers on the bird's head, wings, and tail, a decorative feature commonly associated with New-York-trained potter, Henry Remmey and his son, Henry Harrison Remmey.

Spotted stars surround the eagle's head and stylized clouds ornament the shoulder of the vessel. Flowering vines, culminating in fanned blossoms, ascend from the cobalt-highlighted bung hole. Large circular cobalt brushwork decorates the terminals of each handle. With its striking figural design and outstanding cooler form, this recently-surfaced work ranks as arguably the finest American stoneware object to come to auction since the iconic William Crolius inkstand set a then-record price for the medium at Sotheby's in 1991. A number of factors, including the quality and style of the incising, the color of both the clay and cobalt slip, and the cooler's distinctive floral motifs, link this object to the New-York-trained potters, Henry Remmey, Sr. and his son, Henry Harrison Remmey, while active in Baltimore, MD, circa 1812-1829.

Upon their arrival in Baltimore in 1812, the father and son virtually changed the quality and reputation of the city's stoneware craft overnight. Utilizing potting, decorating, and firing skills acquired in Manhattan, the leading style center of American stoneware production, the Remmeys began producing artistic wares unlike anything the Mid-Atlantic had seen before. The proficiency of the incised decoration and open-handled form are indicative of this training. The added clay segments at the center of each handle are a rare feature, which add structural stability and decorative flair to the form. The exceptional size, form, and decoration of the vessel are enhanced by the brilliant cobalt slip application and evenly-glazed surface, traits also linked to the Remmey's best Baltimore products. A small number of other incised Remmey pieces from Baltimore have survived; collectively, they present the case that the Remmeys' Baltimore period represents American stoneware production at its zenith. However, none of these previously-surfaced examples compare in grandeur or decorative quality to this cooler. Its eagle design, an adaptation of the Great Seal of the United States, was almost certainly copied by the decorator from the reverse of coins in circulation at the time. Engraver Charles Sims's "heraldic eagle" appeared on the reverse of most coins from nickels to five-dollar gold pieces minted during the period of 1796 to 1807.

His design, like that found on this cooler, includes an eagle facing left, toward the arrows, its head encircled by stars and surmounted by stylized clouds. When considering the cooler's craftsmanship, subject matter, form, and origin, its importance as a purely-American work of ceramic art cannot be overstated. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, purchased by the consignor's father at a Pennsylvania estate auction in 1974. A long, curving crack extending from rim onto midsection of reverse. Small rim chips. A 5/8" chip to bottom edge of bung hole and minor chip to top of bung hole. A long, thin horizontal line at base. A small area of surface wear near base on reverse. An in-the-firing fissure to one handle terminal, visible on reverse. Handle is entirely stable. A few very minor base chips. H 19.25".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 17, 2015.

Price Realized: $483,000


VERY RARE TWO GALLON STONEWARE JUG, with J.F. Cartouche, Stamped “BOSTON”, Jonathan Fenton, Boston, MA, late 18th century, finely-potted jug with ovoid body, tall neck, and ribbed handle, the shoulder and spout embellishment with tooled banding. Front of jug decorated with a large impressed cartouche with rope border, bearing the ornate script initials "J F” for potter, Jonathan Fenton. Vivid cobalt highlights to cartouche and handle terminals. Impressed “BOSTON" above cartouche. Fenton stoneware pieces bearing his initialed seal are considered scarce. This example features a wonderful form characteristic of Fenton's earliest and best work, as well as visually-appealing color to the cobalt and clay body. A 10" Y-shaped crack on side of jug, extending onto underside, which forms a spider crack on underside. Shallow chipping to base. A small chip to reverse of spout. H 15.75".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 17, 2015.

Price Realized: $7,187.50


EXTREMELY RARE THREE GALLON STONEWARE JAR, with Incised Bird Decoration, Manhattan, NY origin, possibly Crolius Family, circa 1795, ovoid jar with footed base, heavily-tooled shoulder, and open loop handles, decorated on the front and reverse with a finely-incised design of a large bird with impressed circular eye and scalloped tail tip, perched on a leafy branch. The wing outline and stem are created from a three-pronged, fork-like stylus, a decorative treatment found on some of the finest examples of 18th century Manhattan stoneware known. A similar treatment was employed, for example, on the stems of designs on jars bearing Thomas Commeraw's earliest mark, "COERLEARS HOOK". It is also present on a floral-decorated jug with two-color slip decoration, attributed to Clarkson, Crolius, Sr., sold as lot #191 in Crocker Farm, Inc's July 18, 2015 auction. The interior of both incised designs are filled with a striking, black-colored slip, possibly created by mixing manganese and cobalt. The handle terminals are highlighted in bright-blue cobalt slip. Excellent form, color, glaze treatment, and decoration. One of the finest Manhattan bird-decorated pieces we have ever handled. Tight meadering spider cracks extending from base several inches up body of jar. Additionally, three short cracks on underside, which connect to these cracks. A glazed-over base chip and a few tiny base nicks. A tiny nick on interior of rim. H 12.5".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 17, 2015.

Price Realized: $9,200


EXCEPTIONAL ONE-AND-A-HALF-GALLON STONEWARE JAR, with Vertical Handles and Incised Floral Decoration with Combed Accents, Manhattan, NY origin, circa 1800, ovoid jar with footed base, heavily-tooled shoulder, and vertical loop handles, decorated on the front and reverse with a finely-incised floral design featuring a blossom composed of graduated petals. The decoration is delicately-highlighted in bold cobalt slip, with minimal bleed past the incised boundaries. It includes combed accents to the petals and leaves, as well as a stem created from a three-pronged stylus. One or both of these incised treatments can be found on a number of other well-decorated pieces dating to the last decade of the 18th century, and produced in the Manhattan stoneware complexes of Pot Baker's Hill and Corlears Hook. Additional brushed cobalt highlights appears at the handle terminals. This jar, whose maker is currently unknown, reveals the craftsmanship of a talented potter and decorator, as well as a certain level of skill involved with its firing, displaying even salt glazing and a uniform tan color to the clay throughout. A noteworthy example of early Manhattan stoneware, with superb form, decoration, and color. This jar survives in remarkable, excellent condition, with only very minor flaws. The majority of Manhattan pieces from this time period succumbed to greater damage. A tiny in-the-firing nick to foot. A faint, approximately 2" X-shaped surface line near base and a short vertical line at base, both of which are not visible on the interior and may have occurred in the firing. H 11".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 17, 2015.

Price Realized: $9,200


EXCEPTIONAL THREE GALLON ALKALINE GLAZED STONEWARE JUG, with Two-Color Slip Floral and Bold-Faced "3", attributed to the C. Rhodes Factory, Shaw's Creek, Edgefield District, SC, circa 1850, highly-ovoid jug with tooled spout, the surface covered in a glossy greenish alkaline glaze and decorated in iron and kaolin slip with a leafy stem culminating in a fan-shaped flower and bold-faced number 3. Heavy kaolin-slip details throughout the interior of the decoration. This outstanding example features particularly well-defined slip decoration, with exceptional crispness and brightness to the kaolin slip. The use of the three-gallon capacity designation as a decorative device, which blossoms like a flower from the design's central stem, adds to the folk art appeal of the jug. This example ranks as one of the finest pieces of Rhodes numeral-decorated ware to come to auction in the past decade. Provenance: A fresh-to-the- market example, purchased privately by the consignor nearly fifteen years ago. Two sections of handle reglued. A thin sealed 2.5" hairline on underside, extending up left side of jug and forming a large Y at shoulder. H 15".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 17, 2015.

Price Realized: $17,250


EXCEPTIONAL REDWARE LOAF DISH, with Three-Color Marbled Slip Decoration, Connecticut origin, early 19th century, oval loaf dish with coggled edge, the interior decorated with an exuberant joggled design in cream, green, and brown slip, applied over an orange clay ground with clear lead overglaze. This example features one of the most striking glaze schemes found on New England redware. A remarkable work in terms of color, condition, and decorative technique, this loaf dish is believed to be the finest example of its kind in existence. Immaculate, essentially-unused condition with minimal wear, extremely rare for this form. A few matte-finished spots to the surface near the edge were probably created in the firing. L 14.5".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 17, 2015.

Price Realized: $9,200


EXCEEDINGLY RARE SIX GALLON STONEWARE CREAM JAR, with Cobalt Standing Lion Decoration, Stamped "F. STETZENMEYER / ROCHESTER, NY”, circa 1850, ovoid jar with tooled shoulder, squared rim, and applied lug handles, decorated with a slip-trailed design of a large lion with flowing mane, heavily striped and spotted body, and curled tail, standing atop a stylized ground with a pine tree to the animal's left and shrubs below. Slip-trailed "6" to shoulder. Brushed cobalt highlights to maker's mark. This restored jar combines one of the most highly-prized designs and makers in Northeastern American stoneware. The artistry of the design reveals the hand of a true master of slip-trailed decoration, and exemplifies why Stetzenmeyer stoneware is so admired. Figural designs by this maker are considered very rare, and, to our knowledge, this jar is the first Stetzenmeyer piece with lion decoration to come to auction in decades. Professional restoration to large cracks in front. Professional restoration to exfoliation on front associated with lion's legs and ground. Restoration involves touch-up to areas of decoration, primarily the lion's legs, tail, and the middle of the ground below the lion. An additional top-to-bottom restored crack on left side of jar. Additional significant restoration to base of jar. H 14.75".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 17, 2015.

Price Realized: $21,850


EXCEEDINGLY RARE ONE GALLON STONEWARE JUG, with Cobalt Cat Decoration, Stamped "COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA”, circa 1865, cylindrical jug with tapered spout, decorated with a slip-trailed design of a cat with pointed ears and curled tail, seated atop a brushed oval ground. Cobalt highlights to maker's mark. Few mammal decorations produced at the Cowden & Wilcox Pottery are known. This example features sharp contrast between the dark cobalt slip and gray clay ground, and is potted in a desirable one-gallon size. It is the only example of its kind we are aware of. Excellent, essentially as-made condition with a minor iron ping to shoulder. H 11".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 17, 2015.

Price Realized: $12,650




ONE GALLON STONEWARE BATTER PAIL, with Elaborate Cobalt Grapes and Floral Decoration, Stamped "COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA”, circa 1865, ovoid form with tubular pouring spout, handle at base on reverse, and applied clay ears with wood-and-wire bail handle. Decorated on the reverse with a bough bearing two clusters of grapes extending from a vine with leaves and corkscrewing tendrils. Heavily-decorated on the front with two Harrisburg-style spitting tulips flanking a wreath design around the base of the spout. Additional brushed leaf below. Cobalt highlights to handle terminals and maker's mark. Includes reproduction tin covers. This outstanding example includes strong decoration on both sides in the form of two popular Cowden & Wilcox motifs. While the majority of Cowden & Wilcox batter pails succumbed to some form of damage from use, most commonly to the spout, this examples survives in exceptional, near-flawless condition. Excellent condition with a minor rim nick, minor wear to shoulder molding, and a minor nick to base, which appears to be in-the-firing. H 9.75".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 17, 2015.

Price Realized: $5,175




OUTSTANDING ONE-AND-A-HALF-GALLON STONEWARE BATTER PAIL, with Spotted Cobalt Foliate Decoration, Stamped "COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA”, circa 1865, ovoid form with tubular pouring spout, handle at base on reverse, and applied clay ears with wood-and-wire bail handle. Lavishly-decorated on the reverse with a fan-shaped floral design featuring heavily-spotted leaves flanking an oval bud with elaborate crosshatching. Front of pail with two fan-shaped foliate designs embellished with spots. Wreath motif at base of spout. Cobalt highlights to handle terminals, maker's mark, and capacity mark. Includes tin spout cover. This example is potted in a more-unusual, one-and-a-half-gallon size and features wonderful brushwork with strong folk art appeal. It is the only Cowden & Wilcox batter pail we have seen featuring this design. Damage to end of spout and a 1.5" hairline descending from spout. A shallow 1" chip to handle at base and a second small chip to handle at base. Some small rim chips on reverse. A small rim chip on front. H 10".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 17, 2015.

Price Realized: $3,450




RARE SGRAFFITO DECORATED REDWARE PIPE BOWL, Inscribed "A.F. /1828”, PA origin, possibly Swank Family, Somerset County, PA, 1828, wheel-thrown pipe bowl with thin rim and attached neck with flared rim, the surface covered in bright-green copper slip and sgraffito-decorated with a star, the initials “A+F", and the date “1828". Surface covered in a clear lead glaze. Excellent color and decoration, surviving in remarkable condition for its age. This pipe bowl was consigned from Western Pennsylvania along with two Swank stoneware miniatures, suggesting it may be an early Swank family piece made in Somerset County, PA, prior to their Johnstown operation. Wear to rim of bowl and stem. L 3.75".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 17, 2015.

Price Realized: $3,220


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