Search   
 
 
 
Click on images for larger view
VIBRANT LEHIGH COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA PAINTED DOWER CHEST, inscribed Salame Gaumerrin 1809, having two hearts on the lid which repeat on the front panel, centering a six-pointed star over two stippled drawers, the end panels with three color philphlots, all resting on ogee bracket feet, 30.25" h., 47.75" w., 22.25" d. For a similar example, see Fabian, The Pennsylvania German Decorated Chest, pg. 176, figure 180. Sold at Pook & Pook, April 20,2013, lot 536.

Condition: Lacking lock. Original strap hinges. Repair breaks to foot facings. Minor touch-up to feet. Couple repairs to spurs. Original brasses. Overall good condition.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $12,000-18,000

Price Realized: $18,300


CONRAD GILBERT (BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, 1734-1812), INK AND WATERCOLOR FULL PAGE DRAWING OF A GENTLEMAN, 18th c., wearing a red coat, plaid breeches, red stockings, and holding a bouquet of tulips, 13.5" x 8.125".

Condition

Good. Not examined out of frame.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $20,000-30,000

Price Realized: $39,040


SNOW HILL NUNNERY SLIP DECORATED REDWARE SOUP BOWL, early 19th c., attributed to the Bell family Pottery of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, with yellow and green slip central star with surrounding pinstripe and squiggle decoration, 11" diameter. Accompanied by a booklet Friends of Mercer, by Flack, 2011.

Condition: .25” surface flake to rim.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $3,000-4,000

Price Realized: $4,880


BOLDLY CARVED AND PAINTED AMERICAN EAGLE PLAQUE, 19th c., with glass eyes and shield chest, clutching an olive branch and arrows, fully carved on front and back sides, 17" h., 18" w.

Condition: Repairs to side of claw, tail. Very good condition.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $5,000-10,000

Price Realized: $9,760


PHILIP MUMBAUER (BUCKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, ACTIVE 1811-1841), REWARD OF MERIT, dated 1825, with a figure, possibly of George Washington cutting down the cherry tree, 6.5" x 4".

Condition: Not laid down. Several small patches to black. Bottom right corner cleaned.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $3,000-4,000

Price Realized: $8,540


PENNSYLVANIA PAINTED PINE FARM TABLE, early 19th c., with a scrub top over a base with two drawers, resting on turned legs joined by a box stretcher, retaining an old red surface, 29" h., 82" w., 34" d. Provenance: Purchased at a farm sale in Finland, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.

Condition: Overall good condition. Expected wear and staining to top. Heavier wear to front stretcher. Original top.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $1,500-2,500

Price Realized: $4,436


ATTRIBUTED TO JOHANN ADAM EYER (BUCKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, 1755-1837), ELABORATE INK AND WATERCOLOR ON PAPER VORSCHRIFT, ca. 1785, 8.5" x 12.75".

Condition: Corners taped down. Small repairs along top edge. Cleaned.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $2,500-3,500

Price Realized: $5,612


PAIR OF LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA PUNCHED TIN CANDLE SCONCES, 19th c., with radiating star and a swag border, centered by a crimped edge with spiral rim, 8" diameter.

Condition: Excellent condition. Nice patina. No apparent damages or repairs.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $1,000-2,000

Price Realized: $4,148


EXCEPTIONAL VIBRANT PENNSYLVANIA APPLIQUÉ AND TRAPUNTO QUILT, mid 19th c., having four flower basket panels sectioned by a chain link, with a vivid floral and pumpkin vine border, 104" x 100”.

Provenance: Dupont Family Collection.

Condition: Approximately 7 stitches per inch, some stains mainly on back side, minor fading.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $5,000-8,000

Price Realized: $19,520


JACOB HOESTEDLER FAMILY OF LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA PAINTED PINE CORNER CUPBOARD, ca. 1830, probably made in Harleysville, Lower Salford Township, in two parts, the upper case having a cove molded cornice over two eight light doors with arched top, the base with a single drawer flanked by faux drawers over two raised panel doors with H hinges, retaining the original bold red and salmon grained surface, 84" h., 50" w. A similar example is in the Goschenhoppen Folklife Museum, Green Lane, Pennsylvania.

Condition: Three panes cracked. Original pulls and hinges. Center drawer is working but side ones are faux drawers. Overall good condition.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $10,000-15,000

Price Realized: $18,300


ATTRIBUTED TO ANTHONY REHM (MONTGOMERY AND BUCKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, ACTIVE 1804-1826), INK AND WATERCOLOR ON PAPER BIRTH AND BAPTISMAL CERTIFICATE WITH PIN PRICK DECORATION, for Johannes Schatz, born 1809, Upper Salford Township, with diamond and floral borders, a central crown with swags surmounting heart, tulips and birds, 12" x 15.25". For a similar example, see Moyer, Fraktur Writings and Folk Art Drawings, pg. 232.

Exhibited: Mennonite Historical Society of Eastern Pennsylvania. Provenance: Purchased from the Schatz Family in 1985.

Condition: Repairs on left and right sides. Not examined out of frame.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $12,000-18,000

Price Realized: $17,080


LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA WROUGHT IRON THUMB LATCH, early 19th c., with a double snake head terminal, retaining an old red surface, 11.75" h.

Condition: Mounted to a later painted pine board, very good condition.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $2,684


SCARCE PENNSYLVANIA TIN WITCH RIDING ON A BROOMSTICK COOKIE CUTTER, 19th c., 7.25" h., 4.75" w. Found in the Oley Valley of Pennsylvania. Paul's "favorite cookie cutter of all time".

Condition: Very good condition. No apparent damages or repairs.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $500-1,000

Price Realized: $3,416


PENNSYLVANIA STONEWARE BANK, 19th c., probably Remmey Pottery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with dark cobalt floral and tulip decoration on opposing sides with stepped finial, 7 1/2" h.

Provenance: Collection of Walter Himmelreich, Pennypacker Auction Center, May 1973, Lot 157.

Condition: Small loss at coin slot, small mid body stone pop, faint crows foot to mid body.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $3,000-4,000

Price Realized: $8,540


PENNSYLVANIA BLACK TOLEWARE GOOSENECK COFFEE POT, 19th c., with vibrant floral decoration, 10.52" h.

Provenance: Mable Renner collection; Pennypacker Auction, November 1958.

Condition: Good condition. No apparent damages or repairs.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $5,368
PAINTED ADJUSTABLE TABLE TOP CANDLESTAND, 19th c., having a double arm with tin candle sockets, with the remains of the original red and blue surface on a concentric circle base, supported by canted ball feet, 28.5" h.

Condition: As expected wear, old repair to back edge of lower shelf.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $1,200-1,600

Price Realized: $3,172


OLEY TOWNSHIP ARTIST (BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, ACTIVE 1799-1828), INK AND WATERCOLOR ON PAPER DRAWING, for Isaac DeTurck, early 19th c., with birds, winged angel with trumpets, and mermaids, 7.75" x 6.75”.

Provenance: Christie's, September 20, 2016; Dietrich Collection.

Condition: Not laid down. Top edge taped. Minor scattered small hole repairs to black ink and creases.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $4,000-5,000

Price Realized: $39,040


PENNSYLVANIA SHERATON WALNUT CARVED AND PAINTED LOOKING GLASS, early 19th c., the corner blocks with applied leaves, with a gilt stenciled foliate vine on half columns and polychromed spiral half columns on top and bottom of frame, 11" x 9”.

Provenance: Pook & Pook, Kahn Collection, 2002.

Condition: Lacking some of the leaves on the corner blocks, otherwise excellent.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $3,000-5,000

Price Realized: $6,710
FINE PENNSYLVANIA PAINTED WALNUT SMALL CUPBOARD, early 19th c., retaining a green surface, having a scrolled gallery over a single sunken panel door, resting on cutout feet, 32.75" h., 25" w., 13" d.

Condition; Excellent condition. No apparent damages or repairs.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $1,500-2,500

Price Realized: $7,320


FRANCIS PORTZLINE (SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA, 1771-1857), INK AND WATERCOLOR ON PAPER BIRTH AND BAPTISMAL CERTIFICATE, for Georg Portzline (the artist's son), born 1802, York County, Pennsylvania, with typical parrots, birds and floral vines surrounding a heart with text, 12.75" x 15.5".

Condition: Small patched with infill to edges, small edge tears, minor stains. Not examined out of frame.

Sold at Pook and Pook, The Collection of Paul and Rita Flack October 13, 2018. Photo Courtesy of Pook and Pook.

Estimate: $4,000-6,000

Price Realized: $9,150


AMERICAN (PENNSYLVANIA), EARLY 19TH CENTURY RARE REDWARE MUG, cylindrical with small lip at the base and strap handle. Yellow-brown glaze and slip decoration in brown, green and yellow of a tulip, ferns and suns. 3.75”h. 4”d.

Condition: Chips on base.

Sold at Amelia Jeffers Auctions October 20, 2018, The Chillingworth Auction.

Estimate: $1,500-2,500

Price Realized: $3,600


HEPPLEWHITE SIDEBOARD, American (Baltimore, Maryland), ca. 1790. Mahogany with ebony and Satinwood inlays. Poplar secondary wood. Replaced brass drawer pulls. 40”h. overall. 71.625“l. 29.3758 “d.

Condition: Overall excellent. Nice old refinish. No significant loss or damage.

Sold at Amelia Jeffers Auctions October 20, 2018, The Chillingworth Auction.

Estimate: $1,500-2,500

Price Realized: $4,250




HEPPLEWHITE TALL CASE CLOCK BY WILLIAM GORGAS #9, American (Mount Pleasant (Westmoreland County), Pennsylvania), ca. 1800 - 1815. William Gorgas #9 worked in Greensburg and Mount Pleasant. Painted iron dial with a sweep second hand having an eightday movement. Walnut and crotch walnut case. Exuberantly inlaid with herringbone and a distinctive vine, leaf and dot design. Rectangular crotch walnut door and base with herringbone band and applied beading. Line inlay on the waist with herringbone and swags with flowers. Broken arch with inlaid fan rosettes and a herringbone center medial strip below the finial. Finial replaced. Old refinish. 99”h. with finial, 95.5”h. without.

Provenance: Ex Jim Frenz (Canonsburg, Pennsylvania).

Sold at Amelia Jeffers Auctions October 20, 2018, The Chillingworth Auction.

Estimate: $6,000-8,000

Price Realized: $12,000
RARE MINIATURE TANWARE PITCHER, American (Pennsylvania), late 18th – early 19th Century. New Geneva. Baluster form pitcher with strap handle and small spout. Anodized decoration including scallops and dots and anodized brown glazed interior. 2.25”h.

Condition Report: .125” rim flake at spout.

Provenance: Ex Jim Frenz (Canonsburg, Pennsylvania).

Sold at Amelia Jeffers Auctions October 20, 2018, The Chillingworth Auction.

Estimate: $200-400

Price Realized: $4,250
BLOWN GLASS BOTTLE, American (Pennsylvania), late 18th – early 19th Century. New Geneva amber bottle with globular body, tapered neck, rolled rim and rough pontil. 9”h.

Sold at Amelia Jeffers Auctions October 20, 2018, The Chillingworth Auction.

Estimate: $400-800

Price Realized: $2,000
EXTENSIVE ELIZABETH I SILVER ‘VINE’ PATTERN FLATWARE SERVICE, ASPREY & CO., LTD., LONDON, 1979; HOUSED IN THE ORIGINAL MAHOGANY CANTEEN CHEST, comprising 12 cake/ fruit forks and 12 knives, 12 fish forks and 12 knives, 12 salad forks, 12 luncheon forks, 12 dinner forks, 12 luncheon knives, 12 dinner knives (stainless blades), 8 teaspoons, 12 cream soup spoons, 12 dessert or soup spoons, 11 demitasse spoons, 6 tablespoons, fish serving fork and knife, salad serving fork and spoon, 2 pair of serving forks and 2 spoons, 2 sauce ladles, fowl carving fork and knife, meat carving fork and knife, one knife sharpener (stainless blades), and a punch ladle, not monogrammed. Together with a set of four silverplate serving spoons cast and pierced with grapevine handles. 344 oz. weighable.

Sold at Northeast Auctions, The Dingman Collection, October 27-28, 2018.

Estimate: $6,000-8,000

Price Realized: $12,600




PAIR OF LARGE SAILOR’S SHELLWORK VALENTINES, MID-NINETEENTH CENTURY. Each arranged in a roundel pattern enclosing a rose blossom, within scalloped or geometric panels and surrounded by a curlicue snail shell border; mounted in octagonal frames. Width of frame 18 inches.

Provenance: “Important Marine and China Trade Treasures,” Northeast Auctions, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, August 18-19, 2001, lot 38.

Sold at Northeast Auctions, The Dingman Collection, October 27-28, 2018.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $8,400


SMALL CARVED MARBLE BUST OF GENERAL GEORGE WASHINGTON, EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY. Depicted with an epaulette on one shoulder, the other draped in a cloak. Height 8 inches, length 8.75 inches.

Provenance: Northeast Auctions, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, March 6-7, 2004, lot 411.A closely related example was offered at Christie’s, New York, January 2004, lot 499, described as based on a model by Joseph Wright and “believed to be one of several originating from the Ingram studio in Volterra, Italy, before it closed in 1812.”

Sold at Northeast Auctions, The Dingman Collection, October 27-28, 2018.

Estimate: $1,200-1,800

Price Realized: $3,840


CHARLES WILLSON PEALE (AMERICAN 1741-1827). PORTRAIT OF DR. DAVID RAMSAY OF SOUTH CAROLINA, CIRCA 1785-1790, TOGETHER WITH A SIGNED LETTER DATED PHILADELPHIA, 1781, Oil on canvas, 23 x 19 inches. Unsigned.

David Ramsay (1749-1815), a physician, statesman, and author settled in Charleston, South Carolina, establishing a large medical practice and marrying Martha Laurens, daughter of Henry Laurens. Laurens was a wealthy planter, who became President of the Second Continental Congress. Over the course of his career, Ramsay served as a South Carolina legislator, field surgeon for the militia, delegate to the Continental Congress, and a member and President of the South Carolina Senate. He is considered to be one of the first major historians of the American Revolutionary War. This portrait, one of three by the Peale family, was likely painted while Ramsay served as Chairman of the Congress of the Confederation (successor to the Second Continental Congress) in the absence of John Hancock.

The autograph letter is addressed to Major General Benjamin Lincoln, appointed in 1778 as Commander of the Continental Army’s Southern Department and responsible for the garrison at Charleston. At the time Ramsay wrote to Lincoln regarding his military activities in Carolina, the General was marching south to engage the British at Yorktown, where he was Washington’s second-in-command. One page, double-sided letter on laid paper with remnants of a red wax seal, 8.25 x 13.25 inches.

Provenance: By descent in theRamsay Family; Sumpter Priddy Antiques, Alexandria, Virginia, 2002.

Sold at Northeast Auctions, The Dingman Collection, October 27-28, 2018.

Estimate: $10,000-15,000

Price Realized: $36,000


PHILIP T.C. TILYARD (AMERICAN 1785-1830). PORTRAIT OF COLONEL JAMES MOSHER OF BALTIMORE, CIRCA 1815. Mosher (1761-1845) was President of the National Bank of Baltimore and Collector of the Port of Baltimore. Oil on canvas, 30 x 25 inches. Signed “Tilyard” l.l.

Provenance: Sumpter PriddyAntiques, Alexandria, Virginia.

Sold at Northeast Auctions, The Dingman Collection, October 27-28, 2018.

Estimate: $1,800-2,400

Price Realized: $11,280


PLAN OF THE CITY OF WASHINGTON IN THE TERRITORY OF COLUMBIA, CEDED BY THE STATES OF VIRGINIA AND MARYLAND TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AND BY THEM ESTABLISHED AS THE SEAT OF THEIR GOVERNMENT, AFTER THE YEAR 1800. With several notations inscribed in ink. Engraved by J. Russell, published in “An American Atlas,” London: H.D. Symonds & J. Ridgeway, 1795. Sheet 16 x 21 inches, sight. Frame 23.25 x 28.25 inches.

Sold at Northeast Auctions, The Dingman Collection, October 27-28, 2018.

Estimate: $900-1,500

Price Realized: $2,880


EARLY AMERICAN COUNTRY STEP-BACK CUPBOARD IN BLUE PAINT. In one section; the flared rectangular cornice above a pair of paneled doors opening to three shelves, over an open shelf and pair of paneled doors opening to two shelves, set on a plinth base. Height 82.5 inches, width 48 inches, depth overall 19 inches.

Sold at Northeast Auctions, The Dingman Collection, October 27-28, 2018.

Estimate: $1,500-2,000

Price Realized: $5,280


PENNSYLVANIA COUNTRY WALNUT STEPBACK CUPBOARD. In two parts; the cove-molded cornice edged with a rope-twist border, above two glazed eight-panel doors opening to three shelves, the lower section with two aligned drawers over two panelled covered doors opening to a single shelf, raised on a molded bracket base. Height 89 inches, width 48 inches, depth 20 inches.

Sold at Northeast Auctions, The Dingman Collection, October 27-28, 2018.

Estimate: $700-1,000

Price Realized: $6,600






FIVE RARE WALLPAPER SAMPLES OF AMERICAN INTEREST, FIRST-HALF, NINETEENTH CENTURY. Including “Old Rough and Ready,” “Grand Canal,” Firemen with a Pumper, Stagecoach on a Country Road, and an Early Steam Engine pulling a Coach Carriage. Height of tallest frame,15 inches.

Sold at Northeast Auctions, The Dingman Collection, October 27-28, 2018.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $3,240


PENNSYLVANIA CHIPPENDALE WALNUT OPEN-TOP CUPBOARD.

The coved dental-molded cornice above three shelves within scalloped and scrolled sides, the shelves fitted with plate and spoon holders, above three aligned drawers and a pair of raised-panel cupboard doors with wrought-iron hinges, opening to a single shelf. Height 83 inches, length 72 inches, depth 13.5 inches.

Provenance: SapadinCollection; John Walton; Northeast Auctions, June 6, 2000, lot 660.

Sold at Northeast Auctions, The Dingman Collection, October 27-28, 2018.

Estimate: $9,000-15,000

Price Realized: $28,800


ENGLISH CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY TALL CASE CLOCK, THE DIAL ENGRAVED FOR CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA RETAILER, JOHN MONRO (1758-1810).

The pediment with three brass ball-and-spire finials above an astragal-glazed door opening to a brass dial with Roman numerals, second and date registers, engraved “John Monro, Charlestown” and fitted with brass spandrels, the top with circular strike and silent register, flanked by brass-inlaid reeded columns, the waisted case with arch molded door flanked by brass-inlaid reeded columns on a plinth and double-stepped bracket base. Height 8 feet 3 inches.In the November 25th, 1795 edition of the Charleston, South Carolina “Columbian Herald or New Daily Advertiser” John Monro advertised the following:”John Monro Watch and Clock-maker, No. 7 Elliot Street, Takes this opportunity of informing his friends and the public that he has imported a very complete assortment of Watch and Clock-Maker’s tools and Materials, necessary for repairs; and means to apply entirely to that Business. He flatters himself from general satisfaction expressed from his employers, when formerly in that line, will entitle him again to their favors, particularly as he is determined to observe the strictest punctuality, and adopt the lowest prices in town. All repairs of good watches will be warranted for one year. A Large assortment of Watch Chains, Seals, Keys &c. For Sale.”Charleston’s well-to-do residents, living in a wealthy city of the colonial period, wanted and could afford the best fashionable furnishings imported from England. Paying allegiance to the British Crown, Charleston was often referred to as Charlestown in the period 1670-1783, particularly by those supportive of British rule.

Provenance: Jim Pratt of Estate Antiques, Inc. of Charleston, who purchased the clock from J.D. Langford of Landrum, South Carolina, a direct descendant of the original owner.Charleston, South Carolina, was often referred to as Charlestown from 1670-1783.

Northeast Auctions wishes to thank Jim Pratt for his assistance with this entry.

Sold at Northeast Auctions, The Dingman Collection, October 27-28, 2018.

Estimate: $8,000-12,000

Price Realized: $18,600




(MASTURBATION.) Onania: or, The Heinous Sin of Self-Pollution, and All its Frightful Consequences, (in both Sexes,) Consider'd; with Spiritual and Physical Advice to those who have already injur'd themselves by this abominable Practice . . . Fifteenth Edition. viii, 194; 142 pages. 2 parts in one volume. 8vo, 188x115 mm, contemporary panelled sheep, rebacked; contents foxed and soiled. London: J. Isted, 1730. Fundamental work of scaremongering anti-masturbation literature, first published in an undated edition in the early 1700s and reprinted over 20 times by the end of the century.

Sold at Swann Galleries October 16, 2018.

Estimate: $400-600

Price Realized: $1,625






GONZÁLEZ CABRERA BUENO, JOSÉ. Navegación Especulativa, y Práctica, con la Explicación de algunos Instrumentos, que están mas en Uso en los Navegantes [etc.]. 13 engraved plates. [22], 392, [4] pages. Printed on rag paper. Folio, 315x199 mm, contemporary limp vellum, lacking ties; contents browned, varying offsetting and spotting on plates, small hole in blank outer margin of 2T2. Manila: Convento de Nuestra Señora de los Angeles de la Orden de . . . San Francisco, 1734

First edition of the first navigation manual printed in the Philippines, exhaustively covering the theoretical and practical aspects of the subject, with extensive mathematical tables as well as sailing directions for the Pacific, the California coast from Cape Mendocino to Acapulco, Asian ports, and Spain via the Cape of Good Hope. The author was an admiral and master navigator on the route between Acapulco and Manila. His manual was used on the California expeditions of Gaspar de Portolá, Vicente Vila, and Juan Pérez. Medina/Manila 189; Palau 105121; Lilly Library, Exotic Printing and the Expansion of Europe 56; Wagner, Spanish Southwest 97. RBH notes the Howell, Maggs, and Sabin copies, but none at auction; APBC records only the Scott Library copy sold in 1975 (to Howell). Not in Filipiniana Materials in the National Library (1972), or Union Catalog of Philippine Materials (1970-76).

Sold at Swann Galleries October 16, 2018.

Estimate: $8,000-12,000

Price Realized: $55,000


PENNSYLVANIA BERKS COUNTY PAINTED BLANKET CHEST, American (Berks County, Pennsylvania), ca 1807. A paint decorated blanket chest in poplar, having a molded lift top surface with interior till, the dovetail constructed case dated and paint decorated with tulips and geometrical design, rising on bracket feet; ht. 24, wd. 50, dp. 22.5 in.

Provenance: Property from the Americana Collection of Dr. Dale and Ann Knight Gutman, Cincinnati, OhioPurchased from Irvin & Dolores Boyd, Meetinghouse Antique Shop, Fort Washington, Pennsylvania

Condition: Item is in good condition, retains original finish and paint. Surface wear throughout.

Sold at Cowan’s Auction October 6, 2018.

Estimate: $1,000-1,500

Price Realized: $3,198


CARVED AND TURNED TRIPLE TIERED GILT CHANDELIER, American, late 18th-early 19th century. A twenty-four arm carved and turned chandelier in giltwood, having three tiers of eight arms, support having bead and reeded bold turnings with carved floral decoration; ht. 38, wd. 35 in.

Provenance: Property from the Americana Collection of Dr. Dale and Ann Knight Gutman, Cincinnati, Ohio Purchased from Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Blum, Lisbon, Connecticut

Condition: Item is in good condition with minor gilt loss.

Sold at Cowan’s Auction October 6, 2018.

Estimate: $1,000-1,500

Price Realized: $6,000


FINE BOSTON TORTOISE SHELL COMB OF PATRIOTIC INTEREST, WITH ORIGINAL BOX WITH LABEL, American (Boston), ca 1830. A fine tortoise shell comb with carved patriotic decoration, in its original wallpaper box with label for William B. Swift & Co. of Boston; comb ht. 6.75 in., box ht. 8 in.

Provenance:Property from the Americana Collection of Dr. Dale and Ann Knight Gutman, Cincinnati, Ohio Purchased Robert Thayer American Antiques, Sheffield, Massachusetts

Sold at Cowan’s Auction October 6, 2018.

Estimate: $1,000-2,000

Price Realized: $4,200


FIRST PORTRAIT OF HENRY CLAY BY MATTHEW HARRIS JOUETT, (American, Kentucky, 1788-1827). Oil on panel, housed in a gilt frame, ca 1817-1818. A portrait of Henry Clay (1777-1852); 24.25 x 19.25 in. (sight), 33.25 x 28.25 in. (frame)

After studying with Gilbert Stuart in Boston, Matthew Harris Jouett painted in 1818 the “best known early portrait of Henry Clay," a work which has become the "canonical early image” of Kentucky’s most esteemed statesman. (Amyx, p. 310). Jouett’s portrayal of Clay became so popular that he made several copies; at least five survive. Until recent discoveries in the Jouett literature, exactly which of these portraits was the original has been unclear. Now, we know that the first was “painted for a hemp manufacturer who had come in from the country to hear Mr. Clay speak at the old court-house in Lexington…” andwas so pleased by the Great Commoner’s proposal for a protective tariff that “before leaving the courthouse, he engaged Jouett to make for him a portrait of the statesman” (McDowell, p. 767-768).

James Weir was a Lexington businessman and one-time trustee of the city.Initially a dry goods merchant in partnership with a Mr. Little, he set out on his own in October, 1819, as announced in the Lexington Reporter on May 19.Over the next decade, he built factories which manufactured hemp rope and cotton bagging for the downriver trade. He also became an active supporter of Henry Clay, whose star on the national political scene was in the ascendant.

Clay’s court-house speech was an impassioned plea for protective tariff measures.In the aftermath of the War of 1812, the British, having lost the war, sought to win the battle for economic supremacy over the errant colonies.By flooding the American market with cheap manufactured goods and raw materials they created a severe depression. As reported by the legendary editor Horace Greeley, “our manufacturers went down like grass before the mower. And our agriculture and the wages of labor speedily followed.” (Taylor, p. 78). Conditions in Kentucky were particularly grim, especially in the distilled spirits industry, overwhelmed by imported rum and brandy from British colonies in the Caribbean.

As endorsed by Henry Clay, the tariff act of 1818 sought to remedy the decline by imposing stiff levies, an action clearly beneficial to the interests of James Weir.In aburst of enthusiasm he is said to have paid Jouett $300 on commission for the portrait. (Perrin, p. 276). It is hardly surprising that Jouett was in the audience for Clay’s speech. His studio was located at Short and Market Streets on the corner behind the courthouse, and not just a work space, but frequently the scene for special showings and events to benefit the local community. As a founding member of the Kentucky Institute, the commonwealth’s first scientific society, he was knowledgeable about central Kentucky economics, even reporting that he had heard a paper read on “the importance and best mode of converting grain into spirit.” (Ramage and Watkins, p. 235).

Color, form, and character, the three lessons in likeness Jouett learned from Stuart, were well deployed in his first portrait of Clay. Clay’s warm face tones are richly sympathetic with his hair color, a reddish brown often seen in the family line. His facial features are deeply modelled and contoured, their mass accentuating the high placement on the planar field, and well balanced by the frothy cascading collar, stock, and jabot below. Behind the sitter Jouett has, as he saw in Gilbert Stuart’s portrait of Joseph Buckminster, “flung in a pillar” not as a romantic gesture to past ruins, but as a neoclassical symbol of the solid foundations of the young republic.

But it is Jouett’s grasp of his sitter’s character that marks this portrait, and much of his subsequent work, as subtle yet powerful signs of identity. Clay dominates the canvas, his back straight, parallel to the solid lines of the columnar form. He gazes out toward the viewer with a look at once self-assured and wary, the slight curl of the lips imparting a readiness to snarl or to purr. This is a man who could be both compassionate and disdainful, a figure of authority who also felt that “courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart.” (Channing, p. 408).

Of this portrait Madeleine McDowell, the sitter’s great granddaughter, wrote that the “face which we see” in this portrait “is not the familiar face of the man of matured powers, of ripened judgment, and of wise beneficence, the framer of compromises, the great pacificator. It is Henry Clay the war maker, 'young Harry of the West’ not yet grown old, the leader of young America in the House of Representatives, the man who, with all the ardent patriotism of a child of the decade which had heard the Declaration of Independence, defied the peace party, and drove” the country into the War of 1812, the “Henry Clay in whom was added to the patriotism which he had brought from Virginia, and the enthusiasm which was his birthright, not a little of the reckless daring of the back woodsman of Kentucky.” (McDowell, p. 768).

Apparently Weir and Clay fell out, possibly over issues concerning the Lexington and Ohio Railway of which Weir was a founding investor and trustee. Though initially committed to the project, Clay backed out in the late 1830s, and by 1840 the rail line was bankrupt and forfeited to the Commonwealth of Kentucky.In disgust, Weir sold the portrait of his former idol, sending it on a journey which culminated in acquisition by the venerable firm of David David in Philadelphia, specialists in historic American portraiture. It remained in their inventory until an advertisement in the February, 1966 Antiques Magazinebrought it to the attention of the Lexington dealer Caulder Turner.

Turner’s acquisition was loudly proclaimed in Fred Luigart’s article “Missing Clay Portrait Returned to Lexington” (Louisville Courier-Journal, February 8, 1966). Inspired by the opportunity to enhance both Clay and Jouett’s presence in the Commonwealth, the portrait was purchased by Mr. And Mrs. Frank G. Trimble. It was last shown publicly in 1980 in the exhibition Matthew Harris Jouett: portraitist of the ante-bellum South, organized by William Barrow Floyd for Transylvania University. Now, not only has it reappeared, but its significance as a defining moment in the life of both artist and sitter, has been firmly documented.

LOCATION OF VARIANTS:Ashland, The Henry Clay Home, Lexington; Transylvania University, Lexington; U. S. Department of State, Washington; Westmoreland Museum of Art, Greensburg, Pa.

Works Cited: Amyx, Clifford. “The Portraits of Henry Clay: a brief history and a calendar” in The Papers of Henry Clay: Supplement, 1793-1852. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1992.

Channing, William H. The Spirit of the Age: volume 1. New York: Fowlers and Wells, 1850.

McDowell, Madeline. “Recollections of Henry Clay”, The Century Magazine, 50 (September 1895).

Perrin, William Henry. History of Fayette County, Kentucky. Chicago: O. L. Baskin, Historical Publishers, 1882.

Ramage, James A., and Andrea S. Watkins. Kentucky Rising: Democracy, Slavery, and Culture from the Early Republic to the Civil War. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2011.

Taylor, George Rogers, ed. The Great Tariff Debate 1800-1830. Amherst: Department of American Studies, 1953.

Acknowledgments: This catalog entry was written by Estill Curtis Pennington, of Paris, Kentucky. Pennington is the author ofLessons in Likeness: the portrait painter in Kentucky and the Ohio River Valley, 1800-1920,and is currently compiling a catalog raisonnéof the works of Matthew Harris Jouett.

Provenance: Commissioned by James Weir, 1818; by sale to James Fletcher Johnston, Lexington; to his wife who sold the painting to a private collector in Washington, D.C.; acquired by David David Inc., Philadelphia; by sale to Caulder Turner, Lexington; by sale to Mr. & Mrs. Frank G. Trimble, Jr., Lexington and descended in the family to the present consignor.

Sold at Cowan’s Auction October 6, 2018.

Estimate: $50,000-70,000

Price Realized: $108,000


A FINE AND RARE MINIATURE KENTUCKY CHERRY INLAID SUGAR BUREAU, American (Kentucky, possibly Henry County), first quarter 19th century. A sugar bureau in cherry with poplar secondary, having a rectangular surface with applied nailed molding, the tombstone paneled case decorated with barber pole inlaid base, scalloped apron and sides, one full over a deep bottom drawer with looped corner inlay and later wooden pulls, flanked by looped inlay stiles, rising on turned feet with porcelain casters; ht. 23.5, wd. 27, dp. 16 in

Cowan's is grateful for the comments of Mack Cox, of Richmond, Kentucky who examined photographs of the chest, and pointed out the similarity between this and a chest of drawers perhaps from the same shop sold by Forsythe's Auctions, Lot 110, October 19, 2014.

Provenance:By family tradition, this chest was made in Henry County, Kentucky.

Condition: Old finish dry with later pulls and casters. Upper drawer runners appear to be re-soled. Repair to the back right leg, possibly not original leg.

Sold at Cowan’s Auction October 6, 2018.

Estimate: $7,000-9,000

Price Realized: $12,600






JOHN JAMES AUDUBON’S FAVORITE “LONG TOM” FOWLER DESCENDED DIRECTLY THROUGH THE FAMILY OF HIS WIFE LUCY BAKEWELL AUDUBON.

Exceptionally long percussion fowling piece, with untouched figured maple stock and checkered wrist, fitted with brass buttplate, ramrod pipes, and engraved, “pineapple” style trigger guard, lacking brass fore-end cap.Smoothbore, 60 Caliber, 57.25 in. octagonal to round barrel with untouched deep even age brown patina and brass bead front sight. British proof marks on breech. The lock converted from flintlock to percussion, with lockplate marked "Galton.” Lacking one barrel pin, another replaced with a wooden plug. Evidence of sling swivel mounting on bottom comb of stock.

Affixed to the left cheek plate of the stock is a heavy gage, 5 x 1 in. brass plaque with the following inscription in block letters:

The gun is the original “Long Tom” of John James Audubon.At his death, his widow, Mrs. Lucy Bakewell Audubon gave the gun to her brother William Gifford Bakewell. This statement is testified to by Mrs. William G. Bakewell and Miss Harriet Bachman Audubon, granddaughter of J.J. Audubon.

The gun is offered with a traditional Scottish flattened ornamental powder horn, approximately 11 in. in length, richly decorated with silver fittings cast and chased with Scottish thistles at the spout, midpoint and butt. The butt originally inset with a faceted glass cairngorm (present but loose and chipped). The horn additionally ornamented with a small silver plaque engraved: Presented to J.J. Audubon. By Natural History Society Edinburg 1827. With three silver rings for a silver shoulder strap.

Audubon and His Life in the Ohio Valley

Audubon, John James (1785-1851). French-American hunter, naturalist, painter and ornithologist best known for his iconic masterpiece The Birds of America. Audubon’s “Long Tom,” an English flintlock wildfowling gun, and his presentation powder horn are directly descended from Audubon to the present owner.

Born in 1785 on his father’s sugar plantation in Les Cayes, Saint Domingue (present-day Haiti), John James Audubon’s given name was Jean Rabin. He was the son of a prosperous French naval officer, Jean Audubon, and his mistress, Jeanne Rabin, who died within months of her son's birth. Due to rising slave tensions on the island, Jean Audubon determined that his young son and another illegitimate child should be relocated to France. The children settled near Nantes, France, where they were raised by Audubon and his French wife, Anne Moynet. The young Jean Rabin was formally adopted by the Audubons and his name was changed to Jean-Jacques Audubon. It was the naturalist and ornithologist himself who adopted the name by which we know him today, choosing to Anglicize his name to John James Audubon when he embarked for America in 1803.

While Audubon ostensibly left France to manage land owned by his father at Mill Grove in Pennsylvania, the move was likely initiated to keep John James from being conscripted into Napoleon’s army. Audubon was immediately captivated by the natural wildlife he encountered, and particularly with the birds that flourished in the Pennsylvania wilderness. He was also enchanted by the daughter of one of his neighbors. After a lengthy courtship, he married Lucy Green Bakewell (1787-1874) in 1808. The young couple moved first to Louisville then to Henderson, Kentucky. Operating as a merchant and a miller, Audubon’s business fortunes rose and then fell precipitously during the next decade. Through it all, however, he maintained a passion for wildlife and for sketching. “I seldom passed a day without drawing a bird, or noting something respecting its habits…,” Audubon later wrote of his time in Kentucky.

In the winter of 1819, Audubon was given a much-needed opportunity to improve his finances. Dr. Daniel Drake, a well-respected physician with an interest in natural history, invited Audubon to Cincinnati to work at the newly established Western Museum Society, a precursor to the current Cincinnati Museum of Natural History. Dr. Drake envisioned the Society as a conduit to present western natural history to the public, and he employed Audubon as the museum’s first taxidermist. Audubon was also tasked with painting exhibit backgrounds. Drake was one of the earliest to recognize the significance and quality of Audubon’s work, and went so far as to present a display of his taxidermist’s bird paintings, which was recognized by theCincinnati Inquisitor Advertiseras having style and execution so superior that “…Good judges have indeed declared they excel all other similar works in the United States.”

Audubon embarked from Cincinnati in October 1820 on a journey down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Louisiana. Still plagued by financial difficulties, he now relied fully on his artistic talent to make a living painting portraits and teaching drawing. Most consequentially though, his time along the frontier and in Louisiana saw Audubon focus explicitly on building his portfolio with the intent of assembling a comprehensive collection of North American birds for publication. By 1824, Audubon was actively seeking publication in the United States for his work. Unsuccessful, he sailed for England in 1826 where upon arrival he began courting wealthy patrons and members of the scientific community.

It was here in England that at last Audubon received the recognition, financial backing, and technical support that would launch his career. Audubon was perceived as the incarnation of a vast and romanticized American frontier. His bird paintings, life-like in size, with the species depicted in their natural habitats, were a revelation. Audubon was accepted into the drawing rooms of the elite and into the meeting rooms of the island’s most learned men. By 1827, the first plates of Audubon’s The Birds of Americawere being published. Once little-known and near destitute, John James Audubon soon cemented his legacy as an artist, naturalist and ornithologist in England and the United States.

History and Provenance of Audubon’s “Long Tom” Fowling Rifle and Presentation Powder Horn

Audubon’s fowling rifle – known universally by bird hunters of the 19th century as a “Long Tom” for its characteristically long barrel – was manufactured in Britain sometime in the last half of the 18th century. While the barrel is touched with English proof marks, the rest of the barrel is unmarked.Originally designed as a flintlock, at some point in its history the rifle was converted to percussion, retaining its original lock plate stamped “Galton.”

At least three Galtons (probably all related) were active in London and Birmingham, England from the mid 18thcentury through the mid-19thcentury, though it is not possible to determine which of the relatives made the rifle. The fowler was likely converted from flint to percussion sometime in the 1840s – the heyday of percussion rifles in the United States.

Audubon would have owned many guns during his lifetime. In addition to this hunting fowler, at least two other guns previously owned by Audubon are known to exist. One shotgun resides in the collections of theAmerican Museum of Natural History in New York and a muzzle-loading percussion-cap shotgun is held in special collections at the Princeton University Library. The fowler offered here is believed to be the only Audubongun in private hands, and is impeccably documented.

Throughout his frontier travels and early business ventures, Audubon relied upon his guns for safety, to provide food for his family, and to shoot the bird specimens that filled The Birds of America. Though Cowan’s cannot definitively document to what extent Audubon’s “Long Tom” hunting fowler was used for birds associated with The Birds of America, it is likely that many, if not most, of the birds depicted in this seminal work were taken with this gun. References to Audubon’s “Long Tom” are found in the journal of John James Audubon as well as in Audubon family records, firmly establishing the gun as a well-used and favorite firearm of the naturalist during the critical years in which he prepared early drawings forThe Birds of America.

An early reference to Audubon’s “Long Tom” appears as an entry in his journal. Here he relates an 1819 incident in which “Long Tom” was wielded by his carpenter to fend off a mob attack in Henderson, Kentucky. More significantly, family records attest to the fact that this gun was in Audubon’s possession while in Henderson. A copy of a July 7, 1904,Statement of the long gun belonging to John J. Audubon accompanies this gun. The statement was authored by Martha Dillingham Bakewell (1830-1918) and states in part: The long gun wh’ I gave my son-in-law Frank Shaffer was Mr. Audubon’s favorite hunting gun, & is of very fine maker & cost his father a great deal. He brought it to John J. the naturalist from Paris – When living in Henderson Kentucky the country people called him “That crazy Frenchman with his long gun.” While it cannot be determined with certainty, it is possible that Audubon received this gun from his father in 1805 when he returned to France to handle business matters and ask permission to marry Lucy Bakewell.

Martha Bakewell’s same statement also identifies when Audubon passed his favorite gun to the next family member: “When Mr. Audubon by the advice of friends decided to make his amateur collection complete & of commercial value he went to England to solicit subscriptions to the work – That was the time he gave his favorite long gun, he had used so long, & with wh’ he had collected the most of his specimens to his favorite brother in law & companion Wm. G. Bakewell, my dear noble husband.”Martha Bakewell’s statement concludes with a reference to a key attribute of this gun – that it was altered from a flintlock to a percussion lock. “Originally, it was of course equipped with a flint lock, but in later years Mr. Bakewell had it altered & fitted with a percussion lock. M. D. Bakewell.”

Family members were not alone in noting the affinity that Audubon had for his “Long Tom.” Spencer Fullerton Baird, a naturalist and ornithologist who would one day be appointed the first curator of the Smithsonian Institution, was mentored by Audubon in the early 1840s. In a letter of February 8, 1842, Baird wrote to Audubon about a hunting expedition in which he successfully shot “a poor Golden eye, who unaware of its proximity to a second ‘Long Tom’ came flying calmly up stream….” It is believed that Baird named his own gun “Long Tom” after Audubon’s favorite firearm.

At some point in the history of the gun, a brass plate was added to Audubon’s hunting fowler. The inscription on this plate reads: “This gun is the original ‘Long Tom’ of John James Audubon. At his death his widow, Mrs. Lucy Bakewell Audubon, gave the gun to her brother, William Gifford Bakewell. This statement is testified to by Mrs. William Gifford Bakewell and Miss Harriet Bachman Audubon, granddaughter of John James Audubon.” Interestingly, this inscription indicates that the gun was given to William Gifford Bakewell at Audubon’s death and not upon his departure for England. Nonetheless, while the timing of the handover may be in question, the line of descent of the gun is not.

Like the hunting fowler, Audubon’s powder horn was given to William Gifford Bakewell and descended through his family. The powder horn, however, has a unique history all its own. It was presented to Audubon in 1827 by the Wernerian Natural History Society, a prestigious learned society founded in Edinburgh, Scotland. The Wernerian Society hosted notable scientists of the day and allowed them to present papers on their research. Significantly, members of this organization were more than just fellow scientists and naturalists. They were crucial to Audubon’s success. Presenting papers to the Wernerian Society helped Audubon gain acceptance into England’s scientific community, and it was Wernerian Society member Patrick Neill that introduced Audubon to the famed engraver William H. Lizars.

Memoirs of the Wernerian Natural History Society indicate that on December 16, 1826, a paper prepared by Audubon on the turkey buzzard was read, and, “Mr. Audubon being present, afterwards shewed to the Society his mode of fixing recently killed birds in various attitudes….”

(Also present at that meeting was another scientist who would later make a name for himself, a young Charles Darwin.) Audubon was made a member of the Society by acclamation on the 16th. On January 13, 1827, John James Audubon, Esq. Louisiana was fully invested as a “Foreign” member of the Society and likely received this powder horn on that same day. A silver nameplate on the horn reads“Presented to J. J. Audubon - By - Natural History Society / Edinburg 1827.”

Line of Descent

The rifle and powder horn have an unbroken line of descent from John James Audubon to the present owner.

John James Audobon (1785–1851)

William Gifford Bakewell (1799-1871), brother-in-law of John James Audobon

Maria Dillingham Bakewell (1830-1918), wife of William Gifford Bakewell

Frank Holmes Shaffer (1857-1936), son-in-law of Maria Dillingham Bakewell

Alicia Bakewell Shaffer (1862-1940), daughter of William Gifford Bakewell & wife of Frank Holmes Shaffer

William Bakewell Shaffer (1899-1980), son of Alicia Bakewell Shaffer

Current Owner, grandson of William Bakewell Shaffer

Exhibition History: The hunting fowler and powder horn were included in the J. B. Speed Memorial Museum’s 1935 exhibition John James Audubon. The exhibition catalog indicates that the gun and powder horn wereLoaned by Mrs. Frank Shaffer (Alicia Bakewell). The objects were also loaned by the family in 1985 for the Audubon in Cincinnati exhibit at Cincinnati’s Museum of Natural History & Science.

Acknowledgments: The Fine and Decorative Arts Staff gratefully acknowledges our colleagues Emily Jansen Payne, American History Specialist, and Jack Lewis, Director of Firearms & Militaria, for their contributions to this essay.

Provenance: Descended directly from John James Audubon and Family.

Sold at Cowan’s Auction October 6, 2018.

Estimate: $60,000-80,000

Price Realized: $192,000


RARE PAINT DECORATED CHEST OF DRAWERS BY SAMUEL DUNLAP OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, American (New Hampshire), ca 1795-1810. A chest of drawers in cherry with white pine secondary, dry, untouched vinegar painting on the case, the top with a red wash. Having a dovetailed and step molded cornice, above three aligned and five graduated lap molded dovetailed drawers with brass pulls, having a shaped skirt and sides, all rising on tapered legs; ht. 52.25, wd. 40, dp. 19.75. Signed in chalk below the right-hand upper drawerSamuel Dunlap along with other indecipherable inscriptions.

This chest is one of a handful of signed Samuel Dunlap (1752-1830) case pieces, including a desk sold at Pook and Pook fromThe Estate of Marion and Donald Woelbing, April 25 2014, Lot 24. Stylistically, this chest was likely produced in Dunlap's Salisbury shop, sometime between 1795-1810 after he left Henniker, New Hampshire in 1787 (Philip Zea, Personal Communication August 28, 2018).

Includes several letters and photographs exchanged between Graeter, Samaha, Philip Zea of Historic Deerfield, and Don Finnemore of Winterthur Museum and Gardens. The chest is not illustrated in either Parsons, The Dunlaps and Their Furniture (1970) or in Zea's more recentThe Dunlap Cabinetmakers: A Tradition in Craftsmanship (1997).

Provenance:Ex, William Samaha, Milan, OhioEx. John Graeter, Georgetown, Ohio

Condition: The three aligned drawers have been cleaned of the old varnished surface. Drawer glides replaced, a break and repair to front left leg. Most of original glue blocks are present.

Sold at Cowan’s Auction October 6, 2018.

Estimate: $8,000-10,000

Price Realized: $42,000




1818 KENTUCKY WATERCOLOR PORTRAITS BY THE GUILFORD LIMNER, American (Kentucky), ca 1818. A pair of watercolor portraits of a husband and wife, each half-length within a painted oval reserve and labeled Joseph E. Hardaway and Polly Hardaway, with Polly's portrait dated 1818. Housed in later frames; each 6.75 x 5.5 in. (sheet), 9 x 7 in. (frame).

Joseph Edwin Hardaway (1789-1867) and Polly Board (d. 1830) were married in Breckinridge County, Kentucky in 1811.

AUCTIONEERS NOTE: We have recently tentatively identified these portraits as the work of the so-called "Guilford Limner" the unknown portrait painter known for a small body of work from Guilford County, North Carolina. These portraits significantly pre-date his work in North Carolina, and are evidence of a sojourn in west-central Kentucky.

Sold at Cowan’s Auction October 6, 2018.

Estimate: $2,000-4,000

Price Realized: $9,000


PAINTED CANVAS FIREBOARD, American, (probably New England), first half 19th century or earlier. A painted canvas of a spread-winged eagle flanked by trees within an architectural framework, tacked to a frame of boards with shaped corners, the boards fastened to battens with square-cut nails; 28.25 x 33.5

Provenance:According to the consignor, purchased at a Sotheby's Americana Auction in the late 1980s.

Condition: Canvas is pulling away from board at the edges near nails. Lots of visible craquelure and spotting.

Sold at Cowan’s Auction October 6, 2018.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $7,200


Colonial Sense is an advocate for global consumer privacy rights, protection and security.
All material on this website © copyright 2009-19 by Colonial Sense, except where otherwise indicated.
ref:T3-S24-P9094-C-M