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THE CAPEN HOUSE AT TOPSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS.
Detail of Gable - Built during the second half of the 17th century. An example of the framed overhang type. The central bracket supporting the gable overhang is the original; the "drops" are restored.
THE FAIRBANKS HOUSE AT DEDHAM, MASSACHUSETTS.
Built in 1636. The oldest house in America (excepting possibly the shell and adobe houses of Florida and California), which is now standing, in practically its original condition. The central portion of the house is 279 years old. It was built of White Pine, left unpainted, and remains today a striking tribute to the enduring qualities of this material.
THE OLD BRAY HOUSE AT WEST GLOUCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS.
An example of the hewn overhang type of construction. The large size of the cornice would suggest that a plaster cove cornice had once been used here.
THE CAPEN HOUSE, TOPSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS -
An example of the framed overhang type built during the second half of the 17th century. The "drops" were restored after the Brown house at Hamilton, Massachusetts. The bracket in the center of the gable overhang is the original one; those at the sides of the doorway are reproduced from this, and are a sensible embellishment, but not as constructional as the girt-supported posts and the drops usual in this position. The use of "drop" ornaments in the gable is questionable. The fenestration has been unchanged in restoration, although leaded sash have been substituted in place of "double-hung" sash.
THE OLD LOW HOUSE, WENHAM, MASSACHUSETTS -
The original house was built in the second half of the 17th century, with framed overhang, front and side. In the 18th century the addition in front of this was added, the chimneys both being of this later period. The house is a picturesque growth and combination of the two periods.
THE CORBETT HOUSE, IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS -
Of the hewn overhang type and built during the second half of the 17th century. The gable end overhang is slight but continuous, with molded edges of framing where showing extensively. The chimney is an excellent example of the "pilastered" type belonging to this period. The fenestration is probably original as to location and size, but it is thought double-hung sash have been substituted for the single leaded sash.
THE OLD ELLERY HOUSE, GLOUCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS.
Of the framed overhang type. Built during the second half of the 17th century. The roof has projecting gable ends with "lean-to." The chimney is large and nearer square than is usual in this kind of house. The original "drops" from the ends of the second-story posts have been removed and small ball-shaped ornaments substituted.
THE JOHN WARD HOUSE AT SALEM, MASSACHUSETTS.
Built in 1634. The exact date of the unpainted White Pine siding is not known, but there are records making certain that the siding on the main portion of the house is from 150 to 200 years old, and stands now as originally built with practically no repair. Although the siding of the lean-to is of a much later date, one is unable to notice an appreciable difference between it and that put on almost two hundred years ago. The Ward house, as can be plainly seen by this illustration, is in splendid condition to-day, and testifies to the lasting qualities of White Pine.
THE OLD BOARDMAN HOUSE, SAUGUS, MASSACHUSETTS.

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY HOUSE WHICH HAS NEVER BEEN PAINTED.

THE SALTONSTALL-WHIPPLE HOUSE, IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS .
Built between 1636 and 1675. Hewn end overhang type. The overhang is here entirely at the end of the house, and in both the second story and attic. The chimney is a good example of this period, with projection at back, indicating early additions to it when the "lean-to" was added. The windows have been restored according to legend with triple sash, but the panes of glass should not be divided by wood muntins, but rather with lead. The house is one of the claimants against the Fairbanks House for the distinction of being the oldest house now standing in America. It was undoubtedly, however, built at a later date.
THE SHUTE HOUSE AT HINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS.
Detail of Side Entrance. A house of unusual type, built about 1762.
THE ISAAC ROYALL HOUSE AT MEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS.
The East Front, now facing the street. Built in 1732 along the lines ol a "nobleman's house" in Antigua. An unusual feature is the horizontal emphasis obtained from the treatment of the windows.
FRONT ELEVATION. THE DOAK HOUSE, MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS.

A GOOD EXAMPLE OF AN EARLY FARMHOUSE, NEAR BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS,
Illustrating shingle ends combined with clapboarding on the front.
THE TYLER HOUSE AT WAYLAND, MASSACHUSETTS.
Built previous to 1725. A typical example of a farmhouse with a room on each side of entrance and a central chimney.
THE CUSHING HOUSE AT HINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS.
Built in the early part of the 18th century, probably in 1730; a good example of the simple farmhouse type.
THE OLD BEMINS HOUSE, WATERTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS.
Built about 1750.
THE STEARNS HOUSE, BEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS.
Built from a design by Reuben Duren, Architect.
OLD FARMHOUSE, SOUTHBOROUGH, MASSACHUSETTS.

THE SHIRLEY-EUSTIS HOUSE, ROXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS.
Built by Governor Shirley, about 1750. This house has two fronts the principal one originally facing the water; the south-side fronts upon the driveway turn and approach.


FRONT ELEVATION, THE WADSWORTH HOUSE.
Built in 1726. The way the front clapboards extend by and beyond the clapboarding across the end gable, without corner boards or other finish of any kind, should be noted.


THE WADSWORTH HOUSE, CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS.
Built in 1726.


ANOTHER VIEW OF THE ISAAC ROYALL HOUSE AT MEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS.
Built in 1732. A small part of this house, built in 1631, is the oldest section of any house now standing in America. The principal portion of the mansion was not, however, built until 1732, The exterior of the front and back of this house is in the original White Pine.


OLD FARM HOUSE AT MILTON, MASSACHUSETTS.
Built before 1800. An unusual element occurs in the old porch and the projection of the first-story rooms.


THE GENERAL PUTNAM HOUSE AT DANVERS, MASSACHUSETTS.
Built about 1744. The outer vestibule and railing are carpenter additions.


THE HOOPER HOUSE, HINGHAM, MASSACHUSETTS.


THE APTHORP HOUSE, CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS.

Built in 1760.


THE DALTON HOUSE, NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS.

Built between 1750 and 1760. This picture is of special interest as showing the house before its recent restoration.


THE OLD TAYLOR HOUSE, ROXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS.

Built in 1790. One of the best examples of a refined New England Colonial house in wood. The porches and iron balconies, all old, are rather exceptional in treatment.


HOUSE AT WAYLAND, MASSACHUSETTS.

Built about 1800. This house was owned by Ralph Adams Cram, Architect, who added the balustrade to the main house and raised the roof of the old woodshed extension to obtain rooms in the second story.


THE GOVERNOR WILLIAM DUMMER HOUSE AT BYFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS.

An example of the prim New England type with fireplaces on the outer end walls.


THE EMERY HOUSE AT NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS.

Built in 1796 by Thomas Coker, Architect. A good example of the New England gambrel roof type.


THE BENNETT HOUSE AT WAYLAND, MASSACHUSETTS.

Built about 1800. Situated at the beginning of the Old Connecticut Path. This house, although late in date, is refined and delicate in treatment. The outside vestibule composes harmoniously with the rest of the design.


THE CRAIGIE-LONGFELLOW HOUSE AT CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS.

Built in 1759 by Colonel John Bassell. While similar in general scheme to the Taylor House, the detail is of a bolder type. The doorway may also be compared with that of the Apthorp House.


THE LORING HOUSE AT OLD ROXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS.

Built in 1757 by Commodore Joshua Loring. Commodore Loring was chief naval officer in command of the King's ships in the Colonies.


THE HORATIO HOYT HOUSE, DEERFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS.
Excellent example of Connecticut Valley variety of a type of house common to New England.
THE FRARY HOUSE, DEERFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS.
North portion built in 1683. An L variety of the above Hoyt type of house.
THE CROWNINGSHIELD HOUSE AT DANVERSPORT, MASSACHUSETTS. Built by Nathan Reed between 1798, when he purchased this part of Governor Endicott's old "Orchard Farm," and 1803, when he finished his term in Congress. The house was afterward owned by Captain Crowingshield and Captain Benjamin Porter. In the pond in front of the dwelling the first owner experimented with a paddle-wheel steamboat.
"ELMWOOD." RESIDENCE OF JAMES RUSSEL LOWELL, CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS. This house is supposed originally to have been built (in what was then old Watertown) either by John Stratton in 1760 or by Colonel Thomas Oliver in 1770 or 1780. One of the latter dates appears the more probable. The one-story addition shown at the left is of recent date.


THE KITTREDGE HOUSE, NORTH ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS. Attributed to Samuel McIntyre, and very similar to the design of the Pierce-Nichols House in Salem, built by him in 1780 or 1782. The same heavy detail and corner pilaster treatment are found in both structures.


THE COLONEL LOAMMI BALDWIN HOUSE AT WOBURN, MASSACHUSETTS. The owner was an important and influential officer in the early Colonies and the discoverer and improver of the Baldwin apple. The half balusters and odd belly on the corner pilasters, along with their awkward height relation to the windows, are all to be noted in this view.


THE JOHN PIERCE HOUSE, COURT STREET, PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE. Built in 1799. This house contains an excellent example of the old-fashioned circular staircase. The porch is a regrettable later addition. This design has been attributed by some to Bullfinch.


"GOVERNOR BRADSTREET HOUSE," NORTH ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS. Built in 1667 by one of the first settlers of Andover, Simon Bradstreet, afterwards Deputy Governor and Governor. It was also the home of the first woman poet of America, Anne Bradstreet, and survived several Indian raids. the sash in the lower windows are not original.


THE OLD ABBOT FARM HOUSE, ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS. Dating from 1685.


THE PHILLIPS HOUSE, NORTH ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS. Built by the Honorable Samuel Phillips in 1752. The porch covers two end doorways, both with pediments and toplights. The one in the center of the gable had also pilasters and supporting brackets. The smaller door, just at the back wall, had only surrounding architrave but boated eight panels.


THE COLONEL JAMES FRYE HOUSE, NORTH ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS. Built about 1730. The windows, and perhaps the porch, are more modern. A huge elm - a famous landmark planted in 1725 by Chaplain Frye - once stood near this house.


THE OLD ABBOT "TAVERN," ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS. Reputed to have been built about 1740. "Deacon Isaac Abbot's Tavern on the Haverhill Road, where Washington breakfasted on the morning of November 5, 1789." The two vestibules, of the peculiar type locally so prevalent in Andover, are, of course, later additions.


PHELPS HOUSE (OR "PRESIDENT'S HOUSE), ANDOVER HILL, MASSACHUSETTS. A stately and refined dwelling built by William Bartlet, of Newburyport. Begun in 1809, finished in 1812.


THE MANNING HOUSE, ON PORTER ROAD, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS. Built in 1758.


"COL. SAMUEL JOHNSON HOUSE," ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS. This house was built by Capt. Timothy Johnson, and by him given in 1771 to Col. Samuel Johnson, his son.


OLD HOUSE AT ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS. Squire Jno. Kneeland occupied this house about 1796. Exact date of building unknown. It is a charming informal cottage, now known as "Rose Cottage Tea Room."


OLD SWIFT HOUSE, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS. Built in 1795. "Mr. Swift has raised his house and partly boarded it, which is all that's new among us that I can think of." Extract from a letter of 1795 that establishes the date of this structure.


THE JAMES NOYES HOUSE, NEWBURY, MASSACHUSETTS. Built in 1646. The doorways are additions made about 1830.


THE JONATHAN PLUMMER HOUSE, NEWBURY OLDTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS. Built in 1760.


"LORD" TIMOTHY DEXTER HOUSE, NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS. Built about 1772. Showing the house as it at present stands in the High Street after the removal of the forecourt and statues.


THE FOSTER HOUSE, NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS. Built about 1808. Note the wide corner-boards, the interesting treatment of the deck and detail of the dormers.


THE KNAPP-PERRY HOUSE, 47 HIGH STREET, NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS. Built in 1809. The wooden fence corresponds in design with railing around the deck of the house.


THE BRADBURY-SPALDING HOUSE, 28 GREEN STREET, NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS. Built circa 1790 by Theophilus Bradbury. An especially good example of the gambrel roof, three-dormer style type. The doorway has splayed jambs, a characteristic feature of Newburyport houses.


THE THOMAS HALE HOUSE, 348 HIGH STREET, NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS. A very dignified three-story house. Both the porch and the fence are original.


THE MOULTON HOUSE, NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS. Built circa 1810. A stately example of the three-story Newburyport house. The houses along the Ridge are of similar type.


THE SAWYER-HALE HOUSE, NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS. Built during the latter part of the 18th century. Particularly good cornice, dormer spacing and broken scroll pediment.


THE SHORT HOUSE, NEWBURY, MASSACHUSETTS. Built in 1717. A two-story house of the older type with plain pitched roof and large square chimney in each gable end.


THE NELSON-WHEELWRIGHT HOUSE, NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS. An example of the smaller three-story house. The porch is obviously modern.


MANSION, CORNER OF MAIN AND PLEASANT STREETS, NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS.


TWO HOUSES IN MAIN STREET, NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. The one nearer, the Kent House, is all things considered, one of the best of the small houses in Nantucket, with typical doorway; it has the clean-cut, chaste effect of Greek work, and is totally devoid of all effort. The body of the house is a beautiful warm gray, the finish white.


HOUSE IN MAIN STREET, NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. A simple unobtrusive, typically white house in a village street, with hardly any detail, all bathed in sparkling sunlight and splashed with purple-gray shadow; it makes a picture long to be remembers.


THE MARIA MITCHELL HOUSE IN VETAL STREET, NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS.. Erected in 1700. Birthplace of the great astronomer - one of the famous women in America. This shows a good example of the "Captain's Walk" on the roof.


"DUTCH CAP" HOUSE IN MAIN STREET, NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. Known as the "Bucknam House."


HOUSE ON ACADEMY HILL, NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. Known as the "Captain Roland Gardner House." A brilliant white house with deep green blinds and surrounded with very dark green foliage, giving a very opulent color effect.


THE GRISCOM MANSION IN MAIN STREET, CORNER OF FAIR STREET, NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS.


THE MACY HOUSE IN MAIN STREET, NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS. This is a masterly photograph by the "Official Photographer" and gives, as well as any photograph can, the atmosphere of the leafy cobbled streets and the shallow-flecked brilliance of a sunny day in Nantucket.


THE DYER HOUSE, NO. 9 MILK STREET, NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS.


A HOUSE ON THE SEA FRONT, MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS. Back of this austere old house appears a bit of Marblehead's harbor, which is one of the finest along the New England shore.


FRANKLIN STREET, MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS. Showing the way in which the houses are generally built on the street line.


A HOUSE ON STATE STREET, MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS.


THE BOWEN HOUSE, MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS. One of the oldest houses in the town. It is situated on the corner of Mugford Street near Town House. A glimpse is afforded in the irregularity of the land.


THE KING HOOPER HOUSE, MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS. Formerly the residence of "The Honorable Robert Hooper, Esq.," one of the wealthiest merchants of New England before the Revolution. "King" Hooper, as he was called, lived in princely style for those days. Some of the highest dignitaries of the land were entertained in the large banquet hall in the third story.


HOUSE ON MECHANIC STREET, MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS. Dormer windows are unusual to Marblehead, and lend additional interest to this subject.


THE LEE MANSION, MARBLEHEAD, MASACHUSETTS. Built in 1768 by Col. James Lee. Its original cost is said to have been ten thousand lounds. It is still noted for its excellent hall and stairway.


HOUSE ON WASHINGTON STREET, MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS.


HOUSE ON TUCKER STREET, MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS.


THE MILLER HOUSE, DEERFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. Built circa 1710.


PARSON WILLIAMS HOUSE, DEERFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. Now Deerfield Academy, preserved in its present condition with unusual completeness. The best type of work in the middle of the eighteenth century.


THE FRARY HOUSE, DEERFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. Part of the building was erected in 1683, and is the oldest house in the town.


THE OLD MANSE, DEERFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. A typical example of the work of the Middle - and historical Colonial - type built in 1768.


THE WETHERALD HOUSE, DEERFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. Built in 1752. A less elaborate example than the Williams House of the earliest "architectural" type. Just the sort of house that witches might choose for disturbances, via the chimney route, but for the lamentable fact that the chimney had been torn out, giving the house thereby a decidedly bald and unfinished appearance.


THE STEBBINS HOUSE, DEERFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. Built about 1772.


Source: Research by Bryan Wright

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