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Broadsheet Archive

 


A Broadsheet was the colonial version of a newspaper; a large sheet of paper (usually printed only on one side), containing breaking news or official pronouncements. Since it is now the Age of the Internet, we at Colonial Sense scour the web (so you won't have to!), combing for articles of interest relating, in some fashion, to the American colonial era. The 10 most recently-posted items are displayed on our Home page. Older articles, as well as the new, can be found here in a fully searchable format. We hope you find these informative and useful... -- The Colonial Sense Team
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2114 of 2114 Broadsheets
Displaying Broadsheets 1 to 25
  1 2 ... 84 85  


Broadsheets
Still 'drinkable': 200-year-old booze found in shipwreck
August 18, 2014, LiveScience by Agata Blaszczak-Boxe

A 200-year-old stoneware seltzer bottle that was recently recovered from a shipwreck at the bottom of the Baltic Sea contains alcohol, according to the results of a preliminary analysis.

Researchers discovered the well-preserved and sealed bottle in June, while exploring the so-called F53.31 shipwreck in Gdansk Bay, close to the Polish coast. Preliminary laboratory tests have now shown the bottle contains a 14-percent alcohol distillate, which may be vodka or a type of gin called jenever, most likely diluted with water.
This Art Form Disappeared for 300 Years. Meet the Man Who Brought It Back
August 12, 2014, Indian Country Today by Harlan McKosato

Joshua Madalena believes that Jemez black-on-white pottery is the original art form of the Jemez Pueblo people. This unique form of ceramic pottery is tempered with volcanic tuff or rock, slipped with white clay, painted with carbon (vegetable) paint, and fired in an oxygen-free atmosphere. The pottery was used, based on archaeological findings, from about 1300 to 1700 AD throughout the Jemez (pronounced hey-mess) Mountain range and surrounding areas, before being extinguished by Spanish occupation of modern day New Mexico.
Mona Lisa Mania: Our Bizarre Infatuation with That ‘Happy Woman’
August 06, 2014, Biographile by Dianne Hales

Presidents and princes lauded her. Poets penned sonnets to her. Singers crooned of her. Admirers reproduced her image in beads, bread, bulbs, jellybeans, Legos, seaweed and just about every other material imaginable.

But Leonardo da Vinci’s model has stirred more than adulation. A vandal threw acid at the lower part of the painting. A young Bolivian flung a rock, chipping the left elbow. A Russian woman distraught over being denied French citizenship hurled a souvenir mug. The portrait, barricaded behind bulletproof glass, was unharmed
Family finds 300-year-old sunken treasure off Florida's east coast
July 30, 2014, Reuters by Barbara Liston

A Florida family scavenging for sunken treasure on a shipwreck has found the missing piece of a 300-year-old gold filigree necklace sacred to Spanish priests, officials said on Tuesday.

Eric Schmitt, a professional salvager, was scavenging with his parents when he found the crumpled, square-shaped ornament on a leisure trip to hunt for artifacts in the wreckage of a convoy of 11 ships that sank in 1715 during a hurricane off central Florida's east coast.
Origins of mysterious World Trade Center ship revealed
July 29, 2014, LiveScience by Megan Gannon

In July 2010, amid the gargantuan rebuilding effort at the site of the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan, construction workers halted the backhoes when they uncovered something unexpected just south of where the Twin Towers once stood.

At 22 feet (6.7 meters) below today's street level, in a pit that would become an underground security and parking complex, excavators found the mangled skeleton of a long-forgotten wooden ship.
Oldest recorded near-death experience discovered
July 27, 2014, The Times of India by Staff

The oldest medical description of a "near-death" experience has been discovered in a report from a French physician in 1740, scientists say.

The description was found by Dr Phillippe Charlier, a medical doctor and archeologist in France, in a book he had bought in an antique shop.
Shipwrecked and kidnapped: a tale of two castaways on the Great Barrier Reef
July 25, 2014, ABC by Iain McCalman

This is a story of shipwreck, near death, rescue and unexpected friendship. In the mid-19th century, two European youths were separately lost at sea off the Great Barrier Reef, 1000 kilometres apart. Both were rescued and nurtured by Aborigines and by a strange coincidence, each lived with their separate rescuers for 17 years.

At the end of those 17 years, the English sailor chose to leave his adopted people and join the invading British colonists around Bowen, while the other was kidnapped by British trepang (sea cucumber) hunters near today’s Lockhart River on Cape York and returned to his native France. The British men, brandishing guns, believed they were rescuing him. He regarded himself as kidnapped.
State to renounce Trail of Tears at Friday event
July 25, 2014, The Tennessean by Andy Humbles

Lawmakers will publicly renounce Tennessee’s role in the Indian Removal Act of 1830 known as the Trail of Tears at a ceremony on Friday, in the chamber of the House of Representatives.

The ceremony follows a resolution passed by the state legislature and now signed by Gov. Bill Haslam that states regret over the state’s involvement.
The Myth of the Perpetual Motion Machine
July 22, 2014, Disinformation.com by Marcie Gainer

History is rife with intriguing stories of conmen and their ploys. The pathetic, but interesting, story of Charles Redheffer is a testament to the fact that smart men will always expose the dumb man (especially when they are as arrogant as Charles Redheffer).

In 1812, Mr. Redheffer arrived in Philadelphia claiming that he had invented a “perpetual motion machine.” He claimed that it required nothing to run. Quickly Redheffer became something of a celebrity in Philadelphia, where he charged the locals to witness his fantastical machine at work.
Exhibit on real Johnny Appleseed will hit the road
July 19, 2014, The Associated Press by Lisa Cornwell

If you picture Johnny Appleseed as a loner wearing a tin pot for a hat and flinging apple seeds while meandering through the countryside, experts say you're wrong.

They're hoping that a traveling exhibit funded by an anonymous donation to a western Ohio center and museum will help clear misconceptions about the folk hero and the real man behind the legend.
The Descendants of Abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison Donate Family Heirlooms to the Smithsonian
July 18, 2014, Smithsonian by Max Kutner

Growing up, the descendants of abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison knew the attic was off-limits. The Victorian house near Boston had been in their family since the turn of the 20th century, and as family members passed away, heirlooms accumulated on the top floor. When the Garrisons decided to sell the house four years ago, they moved those heirlooms into storage. Last week, the family donated ten of them, including stunning photographs, a watch and Civil War weaponry, to the National Museum of African American History and Culture, set to open in 2016.

Garrison, who was white, helped found the American Anti-Slavery Society, the first abolitionist society to include both blacks and whites. “It’s really the bedrock for where white America begins to demonstrate inequality with African Americans,” says museum curator Nancy Bercaw. In 1831, Garrison founded The Liberator, an anti-slavery publication that Bercaw says likely inspired the Nat Turner slave rebellion.
Interns follow Donner Party path through Utah
July 13, 2014, The Associated Press by Staff

A group of U.S. Bureau of Land Management interns trekked three days this week across a blistering stretch of Utah desert, recreating part of the 1846 path of the ill-fated Donner Party.

The path across Utah's Great Salt Lake Desert en route to California delayed the Donner Party, leading to starvation, deaths and cannibalism when they became stranded in the Sierra Nevada later than expected.
Researchers explore cursed 450-year-old shipwreck at the bottom of the Baltic Sea
July 11, 2014, Fox News by Staff

Researchers have begun exploring the wreckage of the Mars, a Swedish war ship that sank during a naval battle in 1564.

Johan Rönnby, professor of maritime archeology at Södertörn University in Sweden, was recently awarded a grant from the National Geographic Society for his project, "The Maritime Battlefield of Mars (1964)."
Little-remembered Revolutionary War hero a step closer to citizenship
July 10, 2014, The Los Angeles Times (CA) by Richard Simon

Honorary U.S. citizens: Lafayette, Winston Churchill, Mother Teresa. And soon, perhaps, Bernardo de Galvez.

Legislation to make the Spanish hero of the American Revolution an honorary U.S. citizen cleared the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday, even though some of its members said they had never heard of him.
The atlas of King George
July 05, 2014, The Economist by Staff

WHEN King George III proclaimed in 1763 that Canada’s indigenous peoples had rights to their ancestral lands, it bought peace with the locals who outnumbered and sometimes outfought the British colonists. But as the balance of inhabitants shifted—indigenous people now account for only 4.3% of the population—governments took an increasingly narrow view of that promise. In some cases they ignored it completely. On June 26th the Supreme Court of Canada provided a sharp reminder that King George’s word is still law.
What If America Had Lost the Revolutionary War?
July 04, 2014, The Atlantic by Uri Friedman

The Fourth of July—a time we Americans set aside to celebrate our independence and mark the war we waged to achieve it, along with the battles that followed. There was the War of 1812, the War of 1833, the First Ohio-Virginia War, the Three States' War, the First Black Insurrection, the Great War, the Second Black Insurrection, the Atlantic War, the Florida Intervention.

Confused? These are actually conflicts invented for the novel The Disunited States of America by Harry Turtledove, a prolific (and sometimes-pseudonymous) author of alternate histories with a Ph.D. in Byzantine history. The book is set in the 2090s in an alternate United States that is far from united. In fact, the states, having failed to ratify a constitution following the American Revolution, are separate countries that oscillate between cooperating and warring with one another, as in Europe.
The Price They Paid
July 03, 2014, Snopes by Staff

Claim: Essay outlines the fates of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Status: Mixture Of True And False Information
Are We Reading One of the Declaration of Independence’s Most Iconic Lines Wrong?
July 03, 2014, The Blaze by Liz Klimas

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Period.

It is that period in the official transcript and on the 1823 engraving held by the National Archives and Records Administration that is being called into question on the Declaration of Independence, drafted by Thomas Jefferson and signed on July 4, 1776, by the Second Continental Congress.
Phil Collins gives collection of Alamo artefacts to Texas
June 26, 2014, The Guardian (UK) by Tom Dart

Phil Collins, the British pop star, is in the limelight again for donating his private collection of about 200 artefacts from the Texas revolution and the Battle of the Alamo to the state of Texas so they can be stored and displayed at the historic site of the Alamo in San Antonio.
The Bizarre Mechanical Messiah of John Murray Spear
June 24, 2014, Mysterious Universe by Micah Hanks

Clergyman, abolitionist, secret-society founder, 1850's women’s rights and free-love advocate… and eventually a steam-punk “godsmith” seeking to create a kind of holier-than-holy, copper-bound mecha-messiah.

Needless to say, John Murray Spear must have been a sight to be held in his day.
Long-lost shipwreck found in Lake Michigan, explorer says
June 24, 2014, The Associated Press by Staff

A debris field at the bottom of Lake Michigan may be the remains of the long-lost Griffin, a vessel commanded by a 17th-century French explorer, said a shipwreck hunter who has sought the wreckage for decades.

Steve Libert told the Associated Press that his crew found the debris this month about 120 feet from the spot where they removed a wooden slab a year ago that was protruding from the lake bottom. Libert believes that timber was the bowsprit of Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle's ship, although scientists who joined the 2013 expedition say the slab more likely was an abandoned fishing net stake.
Haiti: UNESCO to send experts to examine possible wreck of 'Santa Maria'
June 23, 2014, UN News Centre by Staff

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) announced today that it will provide technical assistance requested by the Government of Haiti and send a mission to the site of an underwater shipwreck, which may be that of the Santa Maria, the flagship of Christopher Columbus’s first voyage to America.

In a letter dated 12 June, Haitian Culture Minister Monique Rocourt asked for the support of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Body of UNESCO’s 2001 Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage, requesting that a mission of experts be sent to the site.
'Turn' Renewed for Season Two by AMC
June 23, 2014, zap2it by Sara Bibel

AMC today announced that it has ordered a second season of its Revolutionary War drama, “TURN,” which attracted a passionate core audience averaging 2 million viewers a week over its initial 10-episode run. “TURN” will return to AMC with 10 new episodes next spring. The network is also pairing encores of the entire first season of “TURN” with “Hell On Wheels” on Saturday nights this summer, to give new viewers a chance to discover and connect with the show.
The mystery of where Plymouth got its start
June 21, 2014, The Boston Globe (MA) by David Filipov

Every American schoolchild knows the story of the Pilgrims’ settlement of Plymouth. But even the most exacting US historian cannot say for sure precisely where that settlement stood.

Now, a team of archeologists is digging through the sand at the bottom of Burial Hill in Plymouth center, their hopes set on unlocking a mystery that has intrigued researchers for generations: the location of the early 17th-century palisades that would define the original borders of the town that calls itself America’s Hometown.
Power company clashes with US history in Virginia
June 21, 2014, The Associated Press by Steve Szkotak

A power company's plan to build high-rise transmission towers within sight of Jamestown Island has stirred opposition from historic preservationists who say they'll be a visual blight from the swampy shore where America sprouted.

Dominion Virginia Power is awaiting permits from the Army Corps of Engineers to construct 17 towers across 4 miles of the James River. The towers would rise above the river to a height ranging from 160 feet to 295 feet, nearly the same height of the Statue of Liberty.

2114 of 2114 Broadsheets
Displaying Broadsheets 1 to 25
  1 2 ... 84 85  

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