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The world doesn't need architects to make buildings. The world needs architects to make architecture.

Expanding on the medieval mantra of let's make really ornate stuff, Early Modern architects created some truly impressive structures using pre-modern construction tools before settling down with simpler and more practical designs; here are some of the more note-worthy.
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Thomas U. Walter

bornactivedied
1804, Sep 41830-18871887, Oct 30
an American architect, the dean of American architecture between the 1820 death of Benjamin Latrobe and the emergence of H.H. Richardson in the 1870s. He was the fourth Architect of the Capitol and responsible for adding the north (Senate) and south (House) wings and the central dome that is predominately the current appearance of the U.S. Capitol building. ...
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Cross-listed in Writers

John Webb

bornactivedied
16111628-1660s1672, Oct 24
an English architect and scholar. In 1654 Webb designed the first classical portico on an English country house, at The Vyne in Hampshire. In the Corinthian style, this portico stamps this older house as Palladian, 50 years before the birth of Lord Burlington. Webb was an amateur scholar who collaborated with Inigo Jones and Walter Charleton to produce a boo...
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George Webster

bornactivedied
1797, May 31818-18451864, Apr 16
an English architect who practised in Kendal, which was at the time in Westmorland, and later in Cumbria. All of his works were executed near his practice, and were located in Cumbria, in north Lancashire, and in the adjacent parts of Yorkshire. Most of his work was carried out on domestic buildings, but he also designed churches, and public and commercial b...
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Cross-listed in CommerceLegal

Ezra Weeks

bornactivedied
unknown1800sunknown
a successful builder who served as a witness in a sensationalized murder trial. John McComb, the architect of Hamilton Grange, and Ezra Weeks would both be key defense witnesses for Ezra Weeks' brother, Levi in one of the most sensational murder trials of the turn of the 18th century. Ezra Weeks was also involved in the design and construction of Gracie Man...
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Elizabeth Mytton Wilbraham

bornactivedied
16321671-17041705
a member of the English aristocracy, who traditionally has been identified as an important architectural patron. Recently she is posited to be the first known woman architect, whose work frequently may have been attributed to men. In addition to a dozen family residences and a larger number of churches, as many as 400 buildings may have been designed by her.
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William Wilkins

bornactivedied
1778, Aug 311804-18391839, Aug 31
an English architect, classical scholar and archaeologist. He designed the National Gallery and University College London, and buildings for several Cambridge colleges.
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Cross-listed in Sculptors

Solomon Willard

borndied
17831861
a carver and builder in Massachusetts who is remembered primarily for designing and overseeing the Bunker Hill Monument, the first monumental obelisk erected in the United States. In Framingham, Massachusetts, Willard's First Baptist Church, Framingham of 1826 still stands, now the oldest building in the town. He is credited with designing some of the first ...
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Cross-listed in Writers

John Wood the Elder

bornactivedied
17041725-17541754, May 23
an English architect, working mainly in Bath. In 1740 he surveyed Stonehenge and the Stanton Drew stone circles. He later wrote extensively about Bladud and Neo-Druidism. Because of some of his designs he is also thought to have been involved in the early years of Freemasonry. His notable work in Bath included: St John's Hospital, Queen Square, Prior Park, T...
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John Wood the Younger

bornactivedied
1728, Feb 251750s-1770s1782, Jun 18
an English architect, working principally in the city of Bath, Somerset. He was the son of the architect John Wood, the Elder. His designs were highly influential during the 18th century and the Royal Crescent is considered to be one of the best examples of Georgian Neo-Classical architecture in Britain.
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Thomas Worthington

bornactivedied
1826, Apr 111840-18971909, Nov 9
a 19th-century English architect, particularly associated with public buildings in and around Manchester. Worthington's preferred style was the Gothic and his building designs were often similar.
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Christopher Wren

bornactivedied
1632, Oct 201653-17181723, Feb 25
one of the most highly acclaimed English architects in history. He was accorded responsibility for rebuilding 52 churches in the City of London after the Great Fire in 1666, including his masterpiece, St. Paul's Cathedral, on Ludgate Hill, completed in 1710.
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Matthew Digby Wyatt

bornactivedied
1820, Jul 281851-18691877, May 21
a British architect and art historian who became Secretary of the Great Exhibition, Surveyor of the East India Company and the first Slade Professor of Fine Art at the University of Cambridge. From 1855 until 1859 he was honorary secretary of the Royal Institute of British Architects, and in 1866 received the Royal Gold Medal. Younger brother of Thomas Henry...
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Thomas Henry Wyatt

bornactivedied
1807, May 91832-18791880, Aug 5
an Anglo-Irish architect who had a prolific and distinguished career, being elected President of the Royal Institute of British Architects 1870–73 and being awarded its Royal Gold Medal for Architecture in 1873. His reputation during his lifetime was largely as a safe establishment figure, and critical assessment has been less favourable more recently, par...
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