Search   
 
 
 
Writers
borndied
1688, May 211744, May 30
an 18th-century English poet. He is best known for his satirical verse, as well as for his translation of Homer. Famous for his use of the heroic couplet, he is the second-most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, after Shakespeare. An Essay on Criticism was first published anonymously on 15 May 1711. Pope began writing the poem early in his career and took about three years to finish it. At the time the poem was published, the heroic couplet style in which it was written was a moderately new genre of poetry, and Pope's most ambitious work. An Essay on Criticism was an attempt to identify and refine his own positions as a poet and critic.
 Gallery (1)

Thumbnail
 Dictionary Citations (11) • View in Dictionary
Arrant: Originally a variant of errant, wandering, present participle of Latin errare, to stray. The original form ...
Badeen: Frivolous, jesting. Via French badine, silly, from Late Latin badare, to gape. Its only literary use is in ...
Bathykolpian: Deep-bosomed. Also bathykolpic; Greek bathos, deep + kolpos, breast. Both forms have been used spelled with...
Bubble-bow: An 18th century fashionable case for a lady's tweezers and the like. Used by Alexander Pope; explained by A...
Cit: Short for citizen. Also citt. Feminine (used by John Dryden, 1685) , citess; Johnson (1751) used cit as a f...
Cosins: An 18th century style of stays, named from the maker. Alexander Pope in THE ART OF POLITICKS (1729) inquire...
Forfex: A pair of scissors. The Late Latin word, used humorously in English, as in Alexander Pope's THE RAPE OF THE...
Irremeable: Without possibility of return. Latin ir, in, not + re, back + meare, to go, pass. This word, used from the ...
Nous: This Greek word for intellect (nous, noos, mind) was used in English, 17th into the 19th century, for commo...
Phantomnation: An illusion; the appearance of a spectre. The word itself was originally a phantomnation; it was first reco...
Prunella: A strong material (originally silk, later worsted) used for students', clergymen's, and barristers' gowns a...
 Dictionary Citations (11) • View in Dictionary
Arrant: Originally a variant of errant, wandering, present participle of Latin errare, to stray. The original form ...
Badeen: Frivolous, jesting. Via French badine, silly, from Late Latin badare, to gape. Its only literary use is in ...
Bathykolpian: Deep-bosomed. Also bathykolpic; Greek bathos, deep + kolpos, breast. Both forms have been used spelled with...
Bubble-bow: An 18th century fashionable case for a lady's tweezers and the like. Used by Alexander Pope; explained by A...
Cit: Short for citizen. Also citt. Feminine (used by John Dryden, 1685) , citess; Johnson (1751) used cit as a f...
Cosins: An 18th century style of stays, named from the maker. Alexander Pope in THE ART OF POLITICKS (1729) inquire...
Forfex: A pair of scissors. The Late Latin word, used humorously in English, as in Alexander Pope's THE RAPE OF THE...
Irremeable: Without possibility of return. Latin ir, in, not + re, back + meare, to go, pass. This word, used from the ...
Nous: This Greek word for intellect (nous, noos, mind) was used in English, 17th into the 19th century, for commo...
Phantomnation: An illusion; the appearance of a spectre. The word itself was originally a phantomnation; it was first reco...
Prunella: A strong material (originally silk, later worsted) used for students', clergymen's, and barristers' gowns a...
Colonial Sense is an advocate for global consumer privacy rights, protection and security.
All material on this website © copyright 2009-19 by Colonial Sense, except where otherwise indicated.
ref:T5-S50-P1196-CPerson-M