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Governance
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1782, Mar 181850, Mar 31
an American statesman and political theorist from South Carolina, and the seventh Vice President of the United States from 1825 to 1832. He is best remembered for being a strong defender of slavery and for advancing the concept of minority rights in politics, which he did in the context of defending Southern values from perceived Northern threats. He began his political career as a nationalist, modernizer, and proponent of a strong national government and protective tariffs. By the late 1820s, his views reversed and he became a leading proponent of states' rights, limited government, nullification, and opposition to high tariffs—he saw Northern acceptance of these policies as the only way to keep the South in the Union. His beliefs and warnings heavily influenced the South's secession from the Union in 1860–61.
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 Timeline (1)
12/28/1832-John C. Calhoun becomes first Vice President to resign over differences with President Andrew Jackson
 Notes (1)
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 Quotes (8) • View in Quotations
A power has risen up in the government greater than the people themselves, consisting of many and various and powerful interests, combined into one mass, and held together by the cohesive power of the vast surplus in the banks.
Beware the wrath of a patient adversary.
In looking back, I see nothing to regret and little to correct.
It is harder to preserve than to obtain liberty.
Learn from your mistakes and build on your successes.
The Government of the absolute majority instead of the Government of the people is but the Government of the strongest interests; and when not efficiently checked, it is the most tyrannical and oppressive that can be devised.
The interval between the decay of the old and the formation and establishment of the new constitutes a period of transition which must always necessarily be one of uncertainty, confusion, error, and wild and fierce fanaticism.
The surrender of life is nothing to sinking down into acknowledgment of inferiority.
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