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borndied
1631, Aug 91700, May 1
an English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who was made England's first Poet Laureate in 1668. He is seen as dominating the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles as the Age of Dryden. Walter Scott called him "Glorious John." After the Restoration, as Dryden quickly established himself as the leading poet and literary critic of his day, he transferred his allegiances to the new government.
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04/13/1668-John Dryden (36) becomes first English poet laureate
 Dictionary Citations (15) • View in Dictionary
Alamort: A form of the French a la mort, to the death; mortally sick, dispirited. Common from 1550 to 1800. Also all...
Anothergates: Of a different sort (a different "gate," or way) . Also anothergaines, anotherguess, anotherguise...
Cit: Short for citizen. Also citt. Feminine (used by John Dryden, 1685) , citess; Johnson (1751) used cit as a f...
Eagre: A tidal wave; especially, the high crest of the tide's rushing up a narrowing estuary -- as in the Humber, ...
Half: In various combinations, half-bull, a pontifical letter of a new pope before his coronation -- the bulla be...
Hans: A frequent nickname of Johannes; Jack. In the phrase hans en kelder (Dutch, Jack in the cellar) , an unborn...
Irremeable: Without possibility of return. Latin ir, in, not + re, back + meare, to go, pass. This word, used from the ...
Kilderkin: A cask, half a barrel ia size. Also kempkin, kinkin, via Dutch, perhaps from Latin quintale, fifth. By a st...
Mulligrubs: A state of depression or low spirits. In his mulligrubs; sick of the mulligrubs, sometimes used of the stom...
Naeve: A spot, blemish. Latin naevus. John Dryden in his ELEGY ON LORD HASTINGS (1649) has: So many spots, like na...
Punk: A prostitute, harlot. From the late 16th century; Shakespeare in MEASURE FOR MEASURE (1603) says: She may b...
Quop: To throb, quiver, palpitate. Also quab, quag; earlier quap. Chaucer in TROYLUS AND CRISEYDE (1374) has: And...
Tind: To light, to kindle; hence, to inflame, arouse; also, to catch fire, become ignited; to become inflamed or ...
Verge: This word had a wide range of meanings, extending from the primal sense (Latin virga) , a rod. Among these ...
Warlock: Originally, an oath-breaker, a traitor. From Old Saxon war, true (Pre- Teutonic root wero, Latin verus) + O...
 Dictionary Citations (15) • View in Dictionary
Alamort: A form of the French a la mort, to the death; mortally sick, dispirited. Common from 1550 to 1800. Also all...
Anothergates: Of a different sort (a different "gate," or way) . Also anothergaines, anotherguess, anotherguise...
Cit: Short for citizen. Also citt. Feminine (used by John Dryden, 1685) , citess; Johnson (1751) used cit as a f...
Eagre: A tidal wave; especially, the high crest of the tide's rushing up a narrowing estuary -- as in the Humber, ...
Half: In various combinations, half-bull, a pontifical letter of a new pope before his coronation -- the bulla be...
Hans: A frequent nickname of Johannes; Jack. In the phrase hans en kelder (Dutch, Jack in the cellar) , an unborn...
Irremeable: Without possibility of return. Latin ir, in, not + re, back + meare, to go, pass. This word, used from the ...
Kilderkin: A cask, half a barrel ia size. Also kempkin, kinkin, via Dutch, perhaps from Latin quintale, fifth. By a st...
Mulligrubs: A state of depression or low spirits. In his mulligrubs; sick of the mulligrubs, sometimes used of the stom...
Naeve: A spot, blemish. Latin naevus. John Dryden in his ELEGY ON LORD HASTINGS (1649) has: So many spots, like na...
Punk: A prostitute, harlot. From the late 16th century; Shakespeare in MEASURE FOR MEASURE (1603) says: She may b...
Quop: To throb, quiver, palpitate. Also quab, quag; earlier quap. Chaucer in TROYLUS AND CRISEYDE (1374) has: And...
Tind: To light, to kindle; hence, to inflame, arouse; also, to catch fire, become ignited; to become inflamed or ...
Verge: This word had a wide range of meanings, extending from the primal sense (Latin virga) , a rod. Among these ...
Warlock: Originally, an oath-breaker, a traitor. From Old Saxon war, true (Pre- Teutonic root wero, Latin verus) + O...
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