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borndied
1608, Dec 91674, Nov 8
an English poet, polemicist, and man of letters, and a civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell. He wrote at a time of religious flux and political upheaval, and is best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost (1667), written in blank verse. Milton's poetry and prose reflect deep personal convictions, a passion for freedom and self-determination, and the urgent issues and political turbulence of his day.
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 Timeline (2)
09/28/1634-John Milton's drama, Comus, performed
04/27/1667-John Milton sells the copyright to Paradise Lost for 10 pounds
 Dictionary Citations (24) • View in Dictionary
Dipsas: A serpent whose bite was fabled to cause a raging thirst. From Wyclif (1382) through John Milton (PARADISE ...
Dole: This common form came into the language from three sources; it has had many meanings. (1) Old English dal, ...
Fadge: A very common verb, from the late 16th century. (1) To fit, be suitable, to fit in with; to get along well ...
Fescue: A twig, a small piece of straw -- sometimes used in allusion to the Biblical mote in one's neighbor's eys. ...
Hap: (1) Chance, fortune; hence, good fortune (whence the present meanings of happily and happiness; haply still...
Hesperian: Relating to the west (the ancient Greeks meant Italy; the Romans meant Spain) ; to the place where the sun ...
Hind: In addition to its still current uses (noun: the female of the deer; adjective, posterior, as the hind quar...
Jocund: Cheerful, merry, gay. A common word, especially favored by poets, since Chaucer's TO ROSEMOUNDE (1380) : Th...
Kickshaw: (1) A fancy dish; not a substantial English recipe, but one of those 'somethings' the frivolous French conc...
Magnific: Eminent; glorious; munificent Imposing, exalted; highly eulogistic. In later use, occasionally suggesting t...
Malengin: Evil machination; fraud; guile. Old French mal, evil + engin, device. Edmund Spenser in THE FAERIE QUEENE (...
Nocent: Cp. couth. Nocent was used from the 15th into the 18th century, rather rarely later. Also nocence, nocency....
Obstringe: To put under obligation. Latin ob, upon, over + stringere, strictum (whence also strict, constrict, etc.), ...
Quair: An early (mainly Scotch) form of (1) where. (2) quire. This may be a variant of choir, as in Shakespeare's ...
Quibble: As a noun. A play upon words. From this sense of quibble came the second sense, as still in the verb, to qu...
Quiver: Nimble, quick. Shakespeare in HENRY IV, PART TWO (1597) says: There was a little quiver fellow, and a' woul...
Sad: The early uses of this word were quite different from its present sense of sorrowful, which first appeared ...
Slothound: A sleuth-hound; a sleuth. In addition to its current uses, slot meant the hoof-marks, hence the track, of a...
Threne: A song of lamentation. Also threnode, threnody (Greek ode, song); threnos. Greek threnos, lament Shakespear...
Vastity: Emptiness, desolateness; later (17th century) vastness, immensity. Hence vastitude, laying waste; later, im...
Whilere: Some time ago; recently. Also whyleare; erewhile. Used by Chaucer (1386), Shakespeare (THE TEMPEST III ii 1...
Whist: Silent, hushed; free from noise or disturbance. Also a verb, to be silent; to hush. Used by Chaucer (1400),...
Wrack: (1) A variant form of wreak, q.v. Hence, wrackful, vengeful, angry; wracksome, destructive. (2) An error fo...
Y-: A prefix (Old English and German ge-, earlier gi-; Teutonic ga) . It had various uses, the most frequent of...
 Dictionary Citations (24) • View in Dictionary
Dipsas: A serpent whose bite was fabled to cause a raging thirst. From Wyclif (1382) through John Milton (PARADISE ...
Dole: This common form came into the language from three sources; it has had many meanings. (1) Old English dal, ...
Fadge: A very common verb, from the late 16th century. (1) To fit, be suitable, to fit in with; to get along well ...
Fescue: A twig, a small piece of straw -- sometimes used in allusion to the Biblical mote in one's neighbor's eys. ...
Hap: (1) Chance, fortune; hence, good fortune (whence the present meanings of happily and happiness; haply still...
Hesperian: Relating to the west (the ancient Greeks meant Italy; the Romans meant Spain) ; to the place where the sun ...
Hind: In addition to its still current uses (noun: the female of the deer; adjective, posterior, as the hind quar...
Jocund: Cheerful, merry, gay. A common word, especially favored by poets, since Chaucer's TO ROSEMOUNDE (1380) : Th...
Kickshaw: (1) A fancy dish; not a substantial English recipe, but one of those 'somethings' the frivolous French conc...
Magnific: Eminent; glorious; munificent Imposing, exalted; highly eulogistic. In later use, occasionally suggesting t...
Malengin: Evil machination; fraud; guile. Old French mal, evil + engin, device. Edmund Spenser in THE FAERIE QUEENE (...
Nocent: Cp. couth. Nocent was used from the 15th into the 18th century, rather rarely later. Also nocence, nocency....
Obstringe: To put under obligation. Latin ob, upon, over + stringere, strictum (whence also strict, constrict, etc.), ...
Quair: An early (mainly Scotch) form of (1) where. (2) quire. This may be a variant of choir, as in Shakespeare's ...
Quibble: As a noun. A play upon words. From this sense of quibble came the second sense, as still in the verb, to qu...
Quiver: Nimble, quick. Shakespeare in HENRY IV, PART TWO (1597) says: There was a little quiver fellow, and a' woul...
Sad: The early uses of this word were quite different from its present sense of sorrowful, which first appeared ...
Slothound: A sleuth-hound; a sleuth. In addition to its current uses, slot meant the hoof-marks, hence the track, of a...
Threne: A song of lamentation. Also threnode, threnody (Greek ode, song); threnos. Greek threnos, lament Shakespear...
Vastity: Emptiness, desolateness; later (17th century) vastness, immensity. Hence vastitude, laying waste; later, im...
Whilere: Some time ago; recently. Also whyleare; erewhile. Used by Chaucer (1386), Shakespeare (THE TEMPEST III ii 1...
Whist: Silent, hushed; free from noise or disturbance. Also a verb, to be silent; to hush. Used by Chaucer (1400),...
Wrack: (1) A variant form of wreak, q.v. Hence, wrackful, vengeful, angry; wracksome, destructive. (2) An error fo...
Y-: A prefix (Old English and German ge-, earlier gi-; Teutonic ga) . It had various uses, the most frequent of...
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