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Writers
borndied
1728, Nov 101774, Apr 4
an Irish novelist, playwright and poet, who is best known for his novel The Vicar of Wakefield (1766), his pastoral poem The Deserted Village (1770), and his plays The Good-Natur'd Man (1768) and She Stoops to Conquer (1771, first performed in 1773). He is thought to have written the classic children's tale The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes (1765).
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03/18/1773-Oliver Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer premieres in London
 Dictionary Citations (10) • View in Dictionary
Benjamin: A short coat worn by men in the late 18th and early 19th century. Brewer derives it from the name of a tail...
Bob: Among the forgotten meanings of bob are: a bunch of flowers; an ornamental pendant; an ear-drop; Oliver Gol...
Deuterogamy: Second marriage. Greek deutero-, second + gamos, marriage. Oliver Goldsmith, in THE VICAR OF WAKEFIELD (176...
Goose: (I) A foolish person. See widgeon. (2) A hiss, as in the theatre -- not the more vulgar sound meant today b...
Jorum: A large drinking-bowl, a punchbowl; the contents thereof; especially, a bowl of punch. From the 18th centur...
Noll: The top of the head; the head,, usually in good-humoured scorn; the noddle. Also nowl, noul, knoll, nole. S...
Nosegay: A bunch of flower. Also, a representation of this. By extension, anything pleasant, especially to sight, ta...
Plaustrary: A wagoner. Latin plaustrum, a wagon, cart. The first syllable rhymes with law. Hence, plaustral, pertaining...
Rakeshame: A dissolute fellow. The word was common in the 17th century. Coming earlier and outlasting rakeshame was th...
Urchin: A hedgehog. Also urchun; nurchon, norchon; urchyn, urchion; hurcheon; irchin, and more. Applied to (1) a fi...
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