Search   
 
 
 
A collection of notable quotations from a variety of Early Modern Era individuals. See the Guide for more details.
LetterAuthorFindSelected
         

A feeling heart is a blessing that no one, who has it, would be without; and it is a moral security of innocence; since the heart that is able to partake of the distress of another, cannot wilfully give it.
— Sir Charles Grandison, 1753
— Samuel Richardson
I am forced, as I have often said, to try to make myself laugh, that I may not cry: for one or other I must do.
— Clarissa, 1747
— Samuel Richardson
Love gratified, is love satisfied — and love satisfied, is indifference begun.
— Clarissa, 1747
— Samuel Richardson
My Master said, on another Occasion, that those who doubt most, always erred least.
— Pamela, 1740
— Samuel Richardson
Nothing can be more wounding to a spirit not ungenerous, than a generous forgiveness.
— Clarissa, 1747
— Samuel Richardson
O! what a Godlike Power is that of doing Good! — I envy the Rich and the Great for nothing else!
— Pamela, 1740
— Samuel Richardson
Of what violences, murders, depredations, have not the epic poets, from all antiquity, been the occasion, by propagating false honour, false glory, and false religion?
— Sir Charles Grandison, 1753
— Samuel Richardson
That dangerous but too commonly received notion, that a reformed rake makes the best husband.
— Clarissa, 1747
— Samuel Richardson
The mind can be but full. It will be as much filled with a small disagreeable occurrence, having no other, as with a large one.
— Sir Charles Grandison, 1753
— Samuel Richardson
The pen is almost as pretty an implement in a woman's fingers, as a needle.
— Correspondence with Lady Bradshaigh, 1804
— Samuel Richardson
The person who will bear much shall have much to bear, all the world through.
— Clarissa, 1747
— Samuel Richardson
The pleasures of the mighty are obtained by the tears of the poor.
— Clarissa, 1747
— Samuel Richardson
The World, thinking itself affronted by superior merit, takes delight to bring it down to its own level.
— Sir Charles Grandison, 1753
— Samuel Richardson
There hardly can be a greater difference between any two men, than there too often is, between the same man, a lover and a husband.
— Sir Charles Grandison, 1753
— Samuel Richardson
Those who have least to do are generally the most busy people in the world.
— Sir Charles Grandison, 1753
— Samuel Richardson
Vast is the field of Science … the more a man knows, the more he will find he has to know.
— Sir Charles Grandison, 1753
— Samuel Richardson
Women are so much in love with compliments that rather than want them, they will compliment one another, yet mean no more by it than the men do.
— Sir Charles Grandison, 1753
— Samuel Richardson

Colonial Sense is an advocate for global consumer privacy rights, protection and security.
All material on this website © copyright 2009-20 by Colonial Sense, except where otherwise indicated.
ref:T5-S42-P514-C-M