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A collection of notable quotations from a variety of Early Modern Era individuals. See the Guide for more details.
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'Mistresses are like books; if you pore upon them too much, they doze you and make you unfit for company; but if used discreetly, you are the fitter for conversation by 'em.
— Harcourt, in The Country Wife, act 1
— William Wycherley
A mistress should be like a little country retreat near the town, not to dwell in constantly, but only for a night and away.'
— Dorilant, in The Country Wife, act 1 (1675)
— William Wycherley
And with faint praises one another damn.
— The Plain Dealer (1677), Prologue
— William Wycherley
Go, go to your business, I say, pleasure, whilst I go to my pleasure, business.
— Sir Jaspar Fidget, in The Country Wife, act 2 (1675)
— William Wycherley
Good fellowship and friendship are lasting, rational and manly pleasures.
— Horner, in The Country Wife, act 1
— William Wycherley
He's a fool that marries, but he's a greater that does not marry a fool; what is wit in a wife good for, but to make a man a cuckold?
— Pinchwife, in The Country Wife, act 1
— William Wycherley
I have heard people eat most heartily of another man's meat, that is, what they do not pay for.
— Lady Fidget, in The Country Wife, act 5
— William Wycherley
I weigh the man, not his title; 'tis not the king's stamp can make the metal better.
— The Plain Dealer (1677), Act I, scene 1
— William Wycherley
Marrying to increase love is like gaming to become rich; alas, you only lose what little stock you had before.
— Lucy, in The Country Wife, act 4
— William Wycherley
Necessity, the mother of invention.
— Love in a Wood (1671), Act III, scene 3
— William Wycherley
Women of quality are so civil, you can hardly distinguish love from good breeding.
— Horner, in The Country Wife, act 1 (1675)
— William Wycherley
Women serve but to keep a man from better company.
— Horner, in The Country Wife, act 1
— William Wycherley
Your women of honour, as you call 'em, are only chary of their reputations, not their persons; and 'tis scandal that they would avoid, not men.
— Horner, in The Country Wife, act 1
— William Wycherley

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