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Time: 2 minutes to warm the teapot, 5 to 10 minutes to draw the strength from the tea.

Sufficient: Allow 1 teaspoonful to each person, and one over.

Ingredients
  1. tea
  2. boiling water
Directions
  • Warm the teapot with boiling water
  • Let it remain for two or three minutes for the vessel to become thoroughly hot, then pour it away
  • Put in the tea,
  • Pour in from 1/2 to 3/4 pint of boiling water
  • Close the lid
  • Let it stand for the tea to draw from 5 to 10 minutes
  • Fill up the pot with boiling water and serve

  • There is very little art in making good tea; if the water is boiling, and there is no sparing of the fragrant leaf, the beverage will almost invariably be good. The old-fashioned plan of allowing a teaspoonful to each person, and one over, is still practised.

    The tea will be quite spoiled unless made with water that is actually 'boiling', as the leaves will not open, and the flavour not be extracted from them; the beverage will consequently be colourless and tasteless,--in fact, nothing but tepid water.

    Where there is a very large party to make tea for, it is a good plan to have two teapots instead of putting a large quantity of tea into one pot; the tea, besides, will go farther.

    When the infusion has been once completed, the addition of fresh tea adds very little to the strength; so, when more is required, have the pot emptied of the old leaves, scalded, and fresh tea made in the usual manner.

    Economists say that a few grains of carbonate of soda, added before the boiling water is poured on the tea, assist to draw out the goodness: if the water is very hard, perhaps it is a good plan, as the soda softens it; but care must be taken to use this ingredient sparingly, as it is liable to give the tea a soapy taste if added in too large a quantity.

    For mixed tea, the usual proportion is four spoonfuls of black to one of green; more of the latter when the flavour is very much liked; but strong green tea is highly pernicious, and should never be partaken of too freely.

    Source: The Book of Household Management by Isabella Beeton (1859)

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