Search
  
 
A collection of notable quotations from a variety of Early Modern Era individuals. See the Guide for more details.
LetterAuthorFindSelected
         

All political parties die at last of swallowing their own lies.
— Richard Garnett, Life of Emerson (1887)
— John Arbuthnot
Among innumerable footsteps of divine providence to be found in the works of nature, there is a very remarkable one to be observed in the exact balance that is maintained, between the numbers of men and women; for by this means is provided, that the species never may fail, nor perish, since every male may have its female, and of proportionable age. This equality of males and females is not the effect of chance but divine providence, working for a good end.
— 'An Argument for Divine Providence, taken from the Constant Regularity observ’d in the Births of both Sexes', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 1710-12
— John Arbuthnot
Biography is one of the new terrors of death. — John Arbuthnot
It is impossible for a Die, with such determin'd force and direction, not to fall on such determin'd side, only I don't know the force and direction which makes it fall on such determin'd side, and therefore I call it Chance, which is nothing but the want of art....
— Of the Laws of Chance (1692)
— John Arbuthnot
John looked ruddy and plump, with a pair of cheeks like a trumpeter.
— Describing John Bull, in The History of John Bull
— John Arbuthnot
Law is a Bottomless-Pit, it is a Cormorant, a Harpy, that devours every thing.
— The History of John Bull
— John Arbuthnot
Mathematical Knowledge adds a manly Vigour to the Mind, frees it from Prejudice, Credulity, and Superstition.
— An Essay On the Usefulness of Mathematical Learning, (1701)
— John Arbuthnot
Mathematics make the mind attentive to the objects which it considers. This they do by entertaining it with a great variety of truths, which are delightful and evident, but not obvious. Truth is the same thing to the understanding as music to the ear and beauty to the eye. The pursuit of it does really as much gratify a natural faculty implanted in us by our wise Creator as the pleasing of our senses: only in the former case, as the object and faculty are more spiritual, the delight is more pure, free from regret, turpitude, lassitude, and intemperance that commonly attend sensual pleasures.
— An Essay on the Usefulness of Mathematical Learning (1701)
— John Arbuthnot
The first Care in building of Cities, is to make them airy and well perflated; infectious Distempers must necessarily be propagated amongst Mankind living close together.
— An Essay Concerning the Effects of Air on Human Bodies (1733)
— John Arbuthnot
The Mathematics are Friends to Religion, inasmuch as they charm the Passions, restrain the Impetuosity of the Imagination, and purge the Mind from Error and Prejudice. Vice is Error, Confusion, and false Reasoning; and all Truth is more or less opposite to it. Besides, Mathematical Studies may serve for a pleasant Entertainment for those Hours which young Men are apt to throw away upon their Vices; the Delightfulness of them being such as to make Solitude not only easy, but desirable.
— An Essay On the Usefulness of Mathematical Learning, (1701)
— John Arbuthnot
The Reader may here observe the Force of Numbers, which can be successfully applied, even to those things, which one would imagine are subject to no Rules. There are very few things which we know, which are not capable of being reduc’d to a Mathematical Reasoning, and when they cannot, it’s a sign our Knowledge of them is very small and confus’d; and where a mathematical reasoning can be had, it’s as great folly to make use of any other, as to grope for a thing in the dark when you have a Candle standing by you.
— Of the Laws of Chance, or, a Method of the Hazards of Game (1692)
— John Arbuthnot

Colonial Sense is an advocate for global consumer privacy rights, protection and security.
All material on this website © copyright 2009-21 by Colonial Sense, except where otherwise indicated.
ref:T5-S42-P514-C-M