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Writers
borndied
1572 ca1632, Aug 25
an English Elizabethan dramatist and pamphleteer, a versatile and prolific writer, whose career spanned several decades and brought him into contact with many of the period's most famous dramatists. Dekker embarked on a career as a theatre writer in the middle 1590s. His handwriting is found in the manuscript of Sir Thomas More, though the date of his involvement is undetermined.
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 Dictionary Citations (11) • View in Dictionary
Lib: This was a common form, with various meanings. (1) From the 8th century; a charm. (2) As a verb. From the 1...
Lovertine: Fond of making love. A 17th century coinage, after libertine. Thomas Dekker in THE PATIENT GRISSILL (1603) ...
Mealy-mouthed: Soft-spoken; applied to excessive delicacy of speech, prudery, or to hypocrisy, sycophancy; to one that doe...
Moll: This is a shortening of Molly, a pet-name for Mary. Since the 17th century, it has been used to mean a pros...
Monthly: Madly; as influenced by the moon. An English development like lunatic; Latin luna, the moon. Also moonling,...
Palacious: A 17th century form, supplanted by palatial. Thus Thomas Dekker in BRITTANNIA'S HONOR (1628) spoke of faire...
Pedlers French: The canting language, the special speech of the beggars, vagabonds, and thieves of Tudor times. It is used,...
Quaff: To drink deeply, take a long draught; especially, to drain a cup at a draught. Used since the 16th century;...
Rouncival: Heroic (in size, volume); hence applied as noun or adjective to various large things. Also rownseval, rowns...
Sperse: A shortened form of disperse, perhaps influenced by Italian sperso; spergere, to scatter. Used in the 16th ...
Yerk: (1) To draw stitches tight; to bind tightly. Revived by Walter Scott in THE LAY OF THE LAST MINSTREL (1805)...
 Dictionary Citations (11) • View in Dictionary
Lib: This was a common form, with various meanings. (1) From the 8th century; a charm. (2) As a verb. From the 1...
Lovertine: Fond of making love. A 17th century coinage, after libertine. Thomas Dekker in THE PATIENT GRISSILL (1603) ...
Mealy-mouthed: Soft-spoken; applied to excessive delicacy of speech, prudery, or to hypocrisy, sycophancy; to one that doe...
Moll: This is a shortening of Molly, a pet-name for Mary. Since the 17th century, it has been used to mean a pros...
Monthly: Madly; as influenced by the moon. An English development like lunatic; Latin luna, the moon. Also moonling,...
Palacious: A 17th century form, supplanted by palatial. Thus Thomas Dekker in BRITTANNIA'S HONOR (1628) spoke of faire...
Pedlers French: The canting language, the special speech of the beggars, vagabonds, and thieves of Tudor times. It is used,...
Quaff: To drink deeply, take a long draught; especially, to drain a cup at a draught. Used since the 16th century;...
Rouncival: Heroic (in size, volume); hence applied as noun or adjective to various large things. Also rownseval, rowns...
Sperse: A shortened form of disperse, perhaps influenced by Italian sperso; spergere, to scatter. Used in the 16th ...
Yerk: (1) To draw stitches tight; to bind tightly. Revived by Walter Scott in THE LAY OF THE LAST MINSTREL (1805)...
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