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16111660
a Scottish writer and translator, most famous for his translation of Rabelais. Urquhart was born to an old landholding family in Cromarty in northern Scotland. At the age of eleven he attended King's College, University of Aberdeen. Afterwards he toured the Continent, returning in 1636. In 1639, he participated in the Royalist uprising known as the Trot of Turriff; he was knighted by Charles I at Whitehall for his support. In 1641 he published his first book, a volume of epigrams.
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 Dictionary Citations (17) • View in Dictionary
Bawdreaminy: Bawdy misbehavior. Used by Dampit, in Thomas Middleton's A TRICK TO CATCH THE OLD ONE (1608) . Like Thomas ...
Bennet: (1) An old stalk of grass, left in late winter and early spring; eaten then by cattle, or the seeds by bird...
Contrist: To make sad. French contrister; Latin com (with intensive force) + tristare, to sadden; tristis, sad. Contr...
Curkle: To call as does a quail. An echoic word. Thomas Urquhart in his translation (1693) of Rabelais mentions cur...
Ethopoetic: Representing character or manners. Greek ethos, character + poietikos; poieein, to make, represent. Hence e...
Extispice: Divination -- foretelling events, predicting the future -- using the entrails, usually plucked from a fowl....
Flagon: A large bottle for holding wine or inferior liquors; especially a metal one (carried by pilgrims before sco...
Gigant: The early form of giant, 10th into the 17th century. Via Latin gigantem, from Greek gigas, giganto-. This f...
Growtnoll: A blockhead; a 'great noddle.' Also groutnoll, grouthead, growthed, and more. Used from the 16th century; T...
Ninnybroth: Coffee. A 17th and 18th century term. Ninny, a simpleton, is probably a shortening of an innocent. From it,...
Nippitate: A fine ale, or other good liquor; hence, as an adjective, of prime quality. Also with Latin or Italian endi...
Nuncheon: A slight refreshment of liquor, originally taken in the afternoon; then it moved ahead and became equivalen...
Orison: A prayer. From Old French oreisun, orison (French oraison) ; Latin orationem, whence also oration. Common i...
Pillicock: (1) The penis. Pill and cock were used separately in this sense; pill also was figurative for testicle. The...
Quiddity: (1) The essence of a thing. Formed with the ending -ity from quid (Latin, what), used also in English, mean...
Quisquilious: Made up of rubbish. Also quisquilian, quisquiliary. From Latin quisquiliae, odds and ends; quisque, whateve...
Roger: From the name came various other uses. (1) A begging vagabond claiming to be a poor scholar from Oxford or ...
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