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OUTSTANDING AND EXTREMELY RARE TWO GALLON STONEWARE PITCHER with Elaborate Cobalt Floral Decoration, Stamped "ROCKBRIDGE," Rockbridge Baths Pottery, circa 1845, tall, narrow pitcher with ovoid midsection, slightly-flared collar, and thick applied handle. Midsection decorated with a brushed undulating vine featuring five large tulips and numerous leaves. Spout flanked by wavy stripes of cobalt. Impressed across the front with the large maker's mark, "ROCKBRIDGE". Possibly made by Manhattan-trained potter, John Morgan (see Kurt C. Russ, "Exploring Western Virginia Potters," JESDA, Winter 1995). Exceptional form and size. One of the finest examples of Rockbridge County, Virginia, stoneware known, and perhaps the largest signed pitcher recorded. Provenance: A newly-discovered example, recently found in New Jersey. Excellent condition. A few minor base chips. In-the-firing crazing to surface, which does not extend through to interior. Staining from use to surface. Light wear along spout. H 14 3/4".

Sold at Crocker Farm July 16,2011

Price Realized: $12,650




IMPORTANT AND POSSIBLY UNIQUE TWO PIECE REDWARE PRESENTATION FLOWERPOT with Applied Decoration, Stamped "JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO," Dated March 14, 1874, ovoid flowerpot with rounded rim, decorated with highly unusual molded design of grape clusters and hands grasping rings. Flowerpot rests on a separate flared pedestal base, steadied by a flange tooled into the bottom of the flowerpot prior to firing. Incised on underside of flowerpot "M.E. Bell / March 14 1874". Incised on underside of base "March the 14 1874 / Myrtle E. Bell by C.F. Bell," and stamped "JOHN BELL / WAYNESBORO". Surface with original white and red paint. Charles Frederick Bell (1840-1899), the son of John Bell, made this flowerpot for his niece, Myrtle E. Bell (1869-1935) when she was just five years old. Myrtle was the daughter of potter, Victor Conrad Bell, who spent much of his career as a decorator at his father's shop in Waynesboro. An amazing aspect of this flowerpot is that the fragile piece survived so many years, despite being given to a young child. It is only the second example of pottery we are aware of that was made for Myrtle Bell, the other being a glazed redware horse, incised "Jim made for Myrtle," which sold in the Heilman Collection at Sotheby's in the early 1980s. Myrtle Bell (later Myrtle Deardorff) would eventually come to own the contents of the Bell Pottery, and a large sale was held in 1935 of these goods, which included several rare figural examples. This flowerpot is likely one of the finest Bell flowerpots known, as well as one of the most historically-significant to this family of potters to have surfaced in years. Provenance: Descended directly in the Bell family to its current owner, a Maine resident. Flaking to paint. Otherwise excellent condition. H 6 1/2".

Sold at Crocker Farm July 16,2011

Price Realized: $4,830


IMPORTANT LARGE SIZED REDWARE SCULPTURE OF A HOUSE, Pennsylvania origin, 19th century, hand-built house sculpture with hand-incised bricks and shingles, detailed with four mullioned rectangular windows with drapes, a mullioned circular window, two chimneys, a doorstep, and a bonneted child standing at an open door. Reverse with semi-circular dormer. Second-story windows covered decorated with yellow slip. Roof, chimneys, and reverse covered in a blackish lead and manganese glaze. Entire surface covered in a clear lead glaze. Loss to piece of mullion on circular window. Long flake along left edge of underside, which probably occurred in-the-firing. A few chips along with a shallow 2" flake to bottom edge of roof on reverse. Shallow chip and some tiny nicks to top edge of houses facade. Light wear to base on left side. Possible restoration to chimney liners. L 7 1/8" ; W 5 3/4" ; H 8 3/4".

Sold at Crocker Farm July 16,2011

Price Realized: $6,900


OUTSTANDING THREE GALLON STONEWARE JAR with Folk Art Cobalt Decoration of a Deer Holding a Tree Branch, Stamped "C. HART. & CO. / OGDENSBURGH," New York State origin, circa 1853-1858, ovoid jar with tooled shoulder, slightly-flared rim, and applied lug handles, decorated with a large slip-trailed design of a running deer. Deer holds a tree branch or large leaf in its mouth, and is depicted with a turned head and body accented with spotted and wavy trails of cobalt. A wonderful and imaginative New York State deer design. Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example from a Maine collection assembled during the 1980's. Marlin G. Denlinger Stoneware Auctions, George & Helen van Kennen Collection, April 13, 1985. 3" x 1 3/8" flake on underside at edge, which appears to have occurred in-the-firing. Stone ping to underside. Small chip to exterior of rim. Small chip to interior of rim. H 12".

Sold at Crocker Farm July 16,2011

Price Realized: $3,450


OUTSTANDING SLIP DECORATED REDWARE CHARGER, Inscribed "Enos," Norwalk, CT. origin, circa 1840, with coggled edge, featuring a large yellow slip decoration of the name "Enos" surrounded by looping trails. Exceptional large size and bold decoration. A few edge chips. Tight 2" hairline from edge. Light surface wear. Diameter 14 1/2"

Sold at Crocker Farm July 16,2011

Price Realized: $3.450


OUTSTANDING AND IMPORTANT TEN GALLON STONEWARE CROCK with Incised Peacock-on-Flower Decoration, Ohio origin, circa 1875, cylindrical crock with tooled shoulder, applied lug handles, and rounded rim embellished with extremely rare pie-crust crimping. Front decorated with a very large folk art design of a peacock perched on the stem of a flowering plant. The peacock was created with highly unusual stippled and cobalt-highlighted incising, as well as numerous slip-trailed dots. Tail heavily-brushed with cobalt slip. Detailed flowering plant with mum-like blossoms is incised and cobalt-highlighted, extending from grasses at base. Shoulder decorated with incised and cobalt-highlighted dashes and bands. Incised with a cobalt-highlighted "10" to peacock's right. One of the finest examples of Midwestern stoneware to be offered at auction in several years. A creative and bold figural design with great folk art appeal. Chips to interior of rim. 1 1/2" salt drip on reverse. H 16 1/4".

Sold at Crocker Farm July 16,2011

Price Realized: $13,800


FINE AND RARE GLAZED REDWARE JAR, New England origin, early to mid 19th century, ovoid form with footed base, flared rim, and applied handles, decorated with a folky design of haphazard manganese stripes over a light greenish-tan ground. (Underlying clay is a light buff color.) Good form with excellent coloration. Wear to rim. 1 1/2" hairline above left handle. Wear to surface around midsection. Spots of in-the-firing bubbling to glaze. H 9".

Sold at Crocker Farm July 16,2011

Price Realized: $4,600


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