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IMPORTANT AND VARY RARE SIX-GALLON STONEWARE WATER COLOR, with Panoramic Cobalt Pastoral Scene Featuring Pheasants and a Central Federal House Motif, Stamped "J. & E. NORTON / BENNINGTON, VT.", circa 1855, large-sized, keg-form cooler with tooled and cobalt-highlighted banding, the base with circular bunghole decorated with slip-trailed spots, surrounded by a cobalt band. Additional cobalt highlights to maker's mark and six-gallon capacity mark. Body of cooler exuberantly-decorated around its circumference with an elaborate pastoral scene. Decoration features a central Federal house-on-hill motif depicting two structures with circular window at peak and rectangular windows throughout, the house in the foreground with additional wing extending to the left. The house designs are surrounded by a profuse and artistic slip-trailed scene of four classic Norton pheasant-on-stump motifs extending around the body of the cooler. Five pine trees, four split-rail fences, and heavy ground cover complete the view. The style and quality of the design indicates it was executed by noted stoneware decorator, John Hilfinger (1826-1888), an itinerant artist born in Wurttemberg, Germany, who was active at several potteries in New York State and New England during the third quarter of the 19th century. Hilfinger's finest work is found on Norton family stoneware from Bennington, where he was employed from 1855 to 1864. Coolers such as this example, which would be prominently displayed in a house or public setting, served as wonderful opportunities for a decorator to present his skill and promote the pottery business he worked for. As is the case with many of the great Norton pieces with multiple motifs represented, a concept of scale is irrelevant to Hilfinger. In a whimsical folk art style, the pheasants appear larger than the houses and trees. This cooler is the largest J. & E. Norton cooler we have seen available for sale. Two larger figural-decorated coolers, considered among the greatest examples of American stoneware known, are in the collections of the Bennington Museum and Smithsonian Museum of American History. The monumental size of the cooler to be auctioned translates to a larger-than-usual decorative band around the cooler's midsection, standing 8 1/4" tall. This important work is arguably the finest of three Norton coolers from this period we have offered.

Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, purchased by the consignor decades ago.

Condition: A sealed curving crack from rim on left side of cooler's front, measuring 9" in vertical distance from rim to midsection. A 2" Y-shaped surface line on left side of cooler, not visible on interior. A tight 2.25" hairline at base, continuing roughly 3.625" onto underside. A chip to bottom edge of bunghole. Small rim chips. A /625" hairline from rim. A few in-the-firing iron pings. H 16".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $34,500


EXCEEDINGLY RARE AND IMPORTANT FOUR-GALLON STONEWARE JAR, with Cobalt Starface Decoration, Stamped "COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA", attributed to Shem Thomas, circa 1865, stylishly-formed, ovoid jar with tooled shoulder, flattened rim, and applied lug handles, decorated with an artistic brushed design of a human face surrounded by an eight-pointed star. The rays of the star are applied in an alternating pattern of wider, darker strokes and thinner, longer strokes, creating a dynamic, almost kaleidoscopic, effect to the design. Cobalt highlights to maker's mark, capacity mark, and handle terminals. The decoration on this jar is highly unusual among signed Cowden & Wilcox products, with only a few examples known. The use of a starface motif on Cowden & Wilcox stoneware was undoubtedly inspired by Shem Thomas, a potter employed in Harrisburg during the 1850s and 1860s. Thomas had previously worked for Thompson Harrington, the famous Lyons, NY stoneware potter, perhaps most well-known among collectors for the boldly-slip-trailed starface designs that occasionally decorate his ware. In the case of this jar, the design has been melded with the Pennsylvania style and is applied with a brush. While Thomas may have brought the starface design with him to Harrisburg, it seems evident that he was not the only potter to employ this motif. A few of the handful of Cowden & Wilcox starface designs indicate a more naive artist copying Thomas's work. In the case of this jar, however, we can be almost certain by the deftness of the design, as well as the close likeness of the face to Harrington examples from New York, that it was decorated by Thomas himself. While others may exist, this jar is the finest Cowden & Wilcox piece with starface motif that we have seen. Its striking decoration is executed in vibrant cobalt against a pleasing, light clay ground; the jar is additionally of an impressive four-gallon capacity with unusual rotund form, potted with an opening significantly narrower than its midsection. Certainly one of the finest examples of Harrisburg stoneware to cross the auction block in the last decade or more.

Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, purchased privately by the consignor in the 1990s.

Condition: Excellent, essentially as-made condition with a 5" surface line near base on reverse, not visible on the interior, and some light bubbling to a few areas of cobalt. H 13.5".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $18,400


EXTREMELY RARE TWO-GALLON STONEWARE PITCHER, with Profuse Cobalt Tulip and Wreath Motif, Stamped "M. & T. MILLER / NEWPORT, PA", circa 1870, squat-shaped, ovoid pitcher with flared collar and tooled rim molding, decorated with a heavily-brushed wreath flanking a central tulip. Additional leafy brushwork flanking the spout. Brushed cobalt highlights to handle terminals. Impressed with the maker's mark of brothers, Michael and Theophilus Miller, at the midsection. Spout impressed "2". An exceptionally rare form for this maker, featuring bold brushwork, which typifies this pottery's best designs.

Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, recently found in the Western U.S.

Condition: One spout chip. Very nice condition with only minor flaws. A .75" vertical line along left side of spout. A small chip and a .875" horizontal line to right side of spout. A .5" shallow chip on underside adjacent to a 3/4" shallow chip at base on side of pitcher, which includes a 1/25" U-shaped line extending through it. A tiny chip to side of handle. H 11/5".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $13,800


EXCEPTIONAL TWO-GALLON STONEWARE JUG, with Incised Floral Decoration and Two-Color Slip Decoration, Manhattan, NY origin, late 18th or early 19th century, ovoid jug with footed base, heavily-tooled spout, and ribbed handle, decorated with a large incised design of a stem bearing leaves and two daisy blossoms. The decoration, measuring an impressive 9" tall, is highlighted in a highly-unusual combination of cobalt and blackish-colored slip. Additional slip highlights to handle terminals. Excellent incised details to decoration. Stem of design is formed from a three-pronged stylus. A similar tool is employed on several fine, early examples of incised Manhattan stoneware, produced at the Pot Baker's Hill and Corlears Hook stoneware complexes. This jug was possibly produced by the same maker as the iconic Elizabeth Crane punchbowl with incised fish, widely-regarded as the greatest surviving example of American stoneware. The distinctive stem culminating in a pointed leaf is closely-related to the decoration of a second jug, sold as lot #12 in our November 2, 2013 auction. The jug to be sold in March, however, is much earlier, based on the spout construction, two-color slip, and tripartite stem.

Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, purchased by the consignor decades ago. Previously deaccessioned from the New York Historical Society. An old red-painted museum catalog number on the underside indicates the jug was acquired by the museum in 1937.

Condition: Several base chips. Otherwise excellent, essentially as-made condition with some tight lines to base area, typical of pieces of this age and origin, and most likely in-the-firing. H 15".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $6,900


EXCEPTIONAL TWO-GALLON VERTICAL-HANDLED STONEWARE JAR, with Cobalt Watchspring Decoration, Manhattan, NY or Cheesequake, NJ origin, circa 1775, ovoid jar with footed base, heavily-tooled shoulder, and ribbed vertical handles, decorated on the front and reverse with a slip-trailed "watchspring" design featuring two cogs flanking a flower bud. Design includes highly unusual cross-hatching highlighting the interior of the bud, particularly evident on one side. Lower handle terminals decorated with petal-shaped slip-trailing. Additional cobalt highlights surround the upper handle terminals. Excellent form, decoration, color, and condition. One of the finest watchspring-decorated jars we have ever offered.

Condition: Excellent overall condition with a .75" base chip and a small area of adjacent, minor base wear. Otherwise as-made condition with a .875" in-the-firing iron ping to one side near base, a .5" ping to one handle, and a few other minor iron pings. H 12.5".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $3,220


VERY RARE LARGE-SIZED STONEWARE SANDER, with Elaborate Cobalt Floral Decoration, New York State origin, possibly Isaac V. Machett, Cornwall, NY, circa 1850, tapered form with recessed base, tooled shoulder, and recessed top pierced with holes. Decorated on the front and reverse with a brushed cobalt flowering plant design. Brushed cobalt band at shoulder and surrounding top edge. Exceptional form, size, decoration, and color. Excellent, essentially as-made condition. H 3.75".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $6,900


RARE STONEWARE FLASK, with Cobalt Tulip Decoration, attributed to David Parr, Sr., Baltimore, MD, circa 1825, with flattened sides and tooled spout, decorated on the front and reverse with a brushed cobalt tulip and a brushed cobalt highlight surrounding the spout. Excellent form, decoration, and color. One of a small number of Baltimore stoneware flasks known.

Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example from a Northeastern private collection.

Condition: Excellent, essentially as-made condition with a minor in-the-firing chip at base. H 8.5".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $3,220


RARE COBALT DECORATED STONEWARE LOG CABIN BANK, attributed to Thomas Haig, Jr., Philadelphia, PA, circa 1845-1855, molded in the form of a log cabin with four windows, two chimneys, and a cider keg at each end. Coin slots on each end carved at the edge of a door. Cobalt highlights to chimneys, windows, and kegs. A highly-prized Philadelphia stoneware form, banks of this type were adopted out of campaign symbols from William Henry Harrison's Whig Party, which, during the Election of 1840, used a log cabin and cider to declare that Harrison was in support of the common man. A small number of other molded cabin banks bear the signature of Thomas Haig, Jr. and dated 1852. Others made at his shop bear the names of journeyman potters or people for whom the banks were made.

Condition: A 1" chip to base. Two minor nicks to one chimney. L 3.875" ; W 3.625"; H 4.25".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $3,335


EXCEEDINGLY RARE AND IMPORTANT TWO-GALLON STONEWARE JUG, with Stenciled Cobalt Squirrel Decoration, Stamped "J.C. WAELDE / NORTH BAY", New York State origin, circa 1860, cylindrical jug with rounded spout, decorated with a stenciled design of a squirrel ascending a tree with slip-trailed trunk and heavily-sponged leaves. Stenciled squirrel motif is applied with sponge, creating an appealing mottled texture to the cobalt slip. Additional stylized, sponged ground below. Slip-trailed number 2 to shoulder, underscored by a series of dashes, which terminate into four spots above the base of the squirrel's tail. Brushed cobalt highlight to maker's mark. This jug is irrefutably the best example of North Bay, NY stoneware we have ever offered, and one of the finest depictions of a squirrel on American stoneware that we have seen. The use of multiple decorative treatments, namely sponging, stenciling, brushing, and slip-trailing, creates a wonderful folk art expression on this jug and other North Bay pieces. The wonderful figural decoration on this example is enhanced by the jug's exceptional color to the clay and cobalt.

Condition: Excellent, essentially as-made condition with a shallow 1" in-the-firing flake to top of spout and an in-the-firing contact mark to right of squirrel. H 14".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $6,900


IMPORTANT AND POSSIBLY UNIQUE STONEWARE PEDESTAL-BASED WATER COOLER, with Profuse Cobalt Tulip Decoration, Inscribed in Cobalt "EILER & SUNSHINE", East Birmingham, PA, circa 1858-1862, skillfully-potted, ovoid cooler with semi-rounded rim, ribbed lug handles, circular bung hole, and pedestal base with rounded foot. Cooler is lavishly-decorated with a series of brushed tulips emanating from the bung hole. Bunghole decorated with a cobalt band around the opening and dashes around its border. Pedestal base inscribed in cobalt, "EiLER & SUNSHINE", and decorated with cobalt dashes around the foot. Additional cobalt stripe decoration below rim and highlighting the handle terminals. Albany-slip-glazed interior. The significance of this example lies not only in its highly artistic form and decoration, but also in its exceedingly rare signature. To our knowledge, this cooler is the only signed example known from the partnership of East Birmingham, PA potters, Philip Eiler and Henry Sunshine, which existed for a short period, from 1858 until 1862 (Schaltenbrand, Big Ware Turners, p. 147-148). The beautiful brushwork on the cooler indicates the partners were apt decorators with tulip designs closely-related to the Boughners of Greensboro. Later stenciled pieces by Eiler, after his partnership with Sunshine had ended, can be found and are considered unusual in their own right. Examples of the coveted pedestal-based cooler form, regarded as the pinnacle of stoneware as an art form from the Western Pennsylvania region, are considered scarce outside of the stoneware manufactories of Beaver County, PA. This recently-surfaced example may be one of the earliest known produced in an area other that county. In addition, few stoneware objects of this quality are known from the Pittsburgh area, and this cooler ranks as one of the finest examples from this historic city known. Essentially unknown to the greater collecting community for years, this cooler is considered one of the great Western PA stoneware discoveries of the past several years.

Provenance: Purchased by a member of the consignor's family over thirty-five years ago.

Descended in the family of legendary Ohio antiques dealer, Clark Garrett.

Condition: A 1.5" base chip. Otherwise as-made condition with two in-the-firing horizontal surface lines where cooler meets base, not visible on interior, and two shorter in-the-firing lines to surface, not visible on interior. H 15.25".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $19,550


RARE AND FINE THREE-GALLON STONEWARE JAR, with Cobalt Woman Decoration, attributed to David Greenland Thompson, Morgantown, WV, circa 1860, cylindrical jar with tooled shoulder, semi-rounded rim, and distinctive extruded handles, decorated on the front with a large figural design of a woman wearing a hat with train, holding a fan or sash. Additional layers of brushed cobalt form the brim of the woman's hat, her collar, and an apron. Trees with two rows of sponged leaves appear to the left and right of the figure. A heavily-brushed cobalt stripe forms the ground below the woman. An additional cobalt stripe decorates the area below the rim and accents to front edge of each handle. Shoulder impressed with distinctive Thompson three-gallon capacity mark. The size and color of the decoration make this jar a particularly striking example. One of the finest Morgantown people crocks we have ever offered.

Provenance: Descended in the family of legendary Ohio antiques dealer, Clark Garrett.

Condition: Very nice condition with a chip to back edge of each handle and a recessed in-the-firing contact mark to front. H 13.25".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $24,150


RARE AND IMPORTANT FOUR-GALLON STONEWARE JAR, with Cobalt Decoration of Two People, Uniontown, PA origin, circa 1865, cylindrical jar with tooled shoulder, flattened rim, applied lug handles, and incised banding around midsection. Front of jar brush-decorated with a design of a two people flanking a freehand number 4. One figure holds a shepherd's crook while the other holds a bouquet of flowers. Freehand stripe decoration below the rim and underscoring the figural designs. Bottom half of jar decorated with two large trumpet flowers blossoming from a central stem. Brushed cobalt highlights to handle terminals. Impressed four-gallon capacity mark on top of rim. This jar exhibits several of the characteristics one seeks in the finest examples of Uniontown stoneware. The distinctive people designs on this jar are noticeably different than those found on Morgantown stoneware, being more narrow and minimalist. The addition of a shepherd's crook in the left figure's hand is also a popular embellishment on Uniontown people decorations. The addition of the trumpet flower motif, a classic Uniontown design, as well as a large freehand capacity marking, further solidify this jar's manufacture in Western Pennsylvania. The striking decorative elements on this jar are augmented by the appealing color of the cobalt and its contrast against the light gray clay body.

Provenance: Descended in the family of legendary Ohio antiques dealer, Clark Garrett.

Condition: Excellent, essentially as-made condition with an in-the-firing salt drip to right of one figure and some small in-the-firing contact marks to surface. H 14".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $20,700


SCARCE TWO-GALLON STONEWARE JAR, with Cobalt Woman Decoration, attributed to David Greenland Thompson, Morgantown, WV, circa 1860, cylindrical jar with tooled shoulder, tapered rim molding, and incised banding around midsection, decorated on the front with a brushed design of a woman holding a parasol, standing atop a sponged ground. Distinctive arched cobalt sponging above figure. Base inscribed twice with a number 2 in freehand cobalt. Cobalt stripe to bottom edge. This example features particularly crisp sponging, and the application of the ground with a sponge, as opposed to a brush, is an unusual treatment. A classic Morgantown figural design.

Provenance: Descended in the family of legendary Ohio antiques dealer, Clark Garrett.

Condition: Excellent condition with a minor chip to bottom edge, a tiny nick to rim, a small in-the-firing ping to front, and some light surface wear. H 11.5".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $11,500


VERY RARE SMALL SIZED REDWARE SUGAR JAR, with Profuse Three-Color Slip Decoration, attributed to Jacob Albright, Jr. and Henry Loy, Alamance County, NC origin, circa 1790-1810, highly-ovoid jar with footed base, flared rim, and open strap handles, decorated in green, cream, and brown slip with a slip-trailed daisy and line motif, interspersed with alternating circumferential bands of cream and brown slip, all applied over a reddish slip-coated ground. Handles decorated with alternating stripes of green, cream, and brown slip. Interior and exterior surface covered in a clear lead glaze. Excellent form in an unusually small size, measuring roughly one-half-gallon to three-quarts, and featuring classic, early North Carolina motifs. The elegant potting and bold slip work on this jar reveal a high level of sophistication and artistry on the part of its maker. Until recently, jars of this type, including this exact example, have been attributed to the Moravian potters of Salem and Bethabara, North Carolina. Recent research, however, has revealed that pieces of this style were made in or around the St. Asaph's District of Alamance County, North Carolina, by members of the Loy and Albright families. The majority of known examples from this school are held in museum collections, most prominently at Old Salem Museum and Gardens in Winston-Salem, NC. Others can be found at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in Williamsburg, VA, the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI, and the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, PA. For more information on Alamance County, North Carolina redware, see Beckerdite, Brown, and Carnes-McNaughton, ""Slipware from the St. Asaph's Tradition", Ceramics in America 2010; see also Beckerdite, Brown, Hunter, and Carnes-McNaughton, "Earthenware Masterworks from the St. Asaph's Tradition", Antiques and Fine Art Magazine, Winter 2010.

Provenance: Christie's, The John Gordon Collection of Folk Americana, Jan. 15, 1999, Lot 312. to rim.

Condition: Typical sporadic glaze loss. Minor base chips. Nicks and wear. Remarkably, no cracks, and lead-glazed interior survives in essentially original condition. H 7".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $28,750


RARE AND FINE MORAVIAN POLYCHROME-GLAZED REDWARE SQUIRREL BOTTLE, attributed to Rudolph Christ, Salem, NC, circa 1804-1829, molded in the form of a standing squirrel feeding on a nut atop an oval base, the bottle dipped in a cream-colored slip, decorated with heavy daubs of copper and manganese, and covered in a clear lead glaze. The squirrel's sophisticated and colorful glaze scheme is modeled after the popular tortoiseshell creamware of English potter, Thomas Whieldon. An iconic Southern figural form. Flake to underside of front paws.

Condition: Some restored flakes to back and tail of squirrel on one side. Restored flakes to end of tail, including restoration to surface at juncture of the tail to the squirrel's head. Light wear to one ear. Base chips. A 1.25" in-the-firing horizontal separation line where squirrel meets base. H 7.75".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $6,325


EXCEPTIONAL LARGE SIZED REDWARE FIGURE OF A SEATED DOG WITH BASKET, incised "A", Pennsylvania origin, circa 1850-1875, hand-modeled figure of a seated dog with poodle cut and curled tail, holding a basket of apples in its mouth. Heavily-incised fur to body, haunches, and tip of tail. Delicately-incised details to face, collar, apple basket, and paws. Base decorated with impressed circle motifs around border, surrounding a central incised and impressed floral design. Figure rattles when shaken. Torso, haunches, and tip of tail decorated with manganese highlights. Chest and base decorated with highly unusual brushed cream-colored slip. Entire surface covered in a clear lead glaze. Underside with crudely incised "A", carved prior to firing. This recently-surfaced example is one of the finest hand-modeled redware dogs we have ever offered. Its larger size, unusual slip treatment, and remarkable condition, all contribute to its rarity. The fragile nature of these figures and their frequent use as children's toys has resulted in most having damage of some sort. The incised letter "A" on underside is possibly a form of signature, which may serve as a basis for future attribution of similar animal figures.

Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, purchased in the Philadelphia area several decades ago by a relative of the consignor. In rarely-found, excellent, essentially as-made condition. H 5.75" ; L 5.5".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $14,950


EXCEPTIONAL REDWARE PRESENTATION JAR, inscribed "Ann Frame / When this you see remember me / 9th mo. 28th 1818", attributed to Thomas Vickers, Chester County, PA, 1818, thin-walled, highly-ovoid jar with arching tab handles, the surface dipped in a yellow slip and incised with the name "Ann Frame" decorating the shoulder. Underside of left handle incised with the date "9th Mo 28th 1818". Underside of right handle incised with the inscription "When this you see remember me". Interior and exterior surface covered in a heavy lead glaze over a colorful, mottled orange and olive ground. The presentation redware objects from Chester County, Pennsylvania have been documented since the early 20th century, a testament to the importance of these objects to American ceramic history. Edwin Atlee Barber describes a closely-related jar in his groundbreaking book, Tulip Ware of the Pennsylvania-German Potters, written in 1903. That jar, which has been in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art since the early 20th century, bears the incised name "Abigail Stromberg", along with the inscription "West Chester chester county ist Mo. 7th, 1822". The jar to be sold in our March 19th auction ranks as one of the most important examples of Chester County, Pennsylvania redware to cross the auction block in recent years. Much of the delicately-potted, early work by the Vickers family is found with moderate to significant damage. This jar, significant in its own right, is made all the more compelling by its extraordinary condition at nearly 200 years of age.

Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, recently discovered in New England.

Condition: Chips to one handle. Wear to rim. A shallow flake to underside. Some expected light wear to surface. H 9.75".

Sold at Crocker Farm March 19, 2016.

Price Realized: $8,050


AMERICAN ENGRAVED CHICKEN EASTER EGG, inscribed Amelia Fogle April 17th 1808, with cross hatched decoration, in a small wallpaper box.

Sold at Pook and Pook March 9, 2016.

Estimate: $100-200

Price Realized: $1,599


RARE COWDEN & WILCOX STONEWARE FIVE GALLON BUTTER CHURCH, with Cobalt Blue Triple Tulip Decoration, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Bulbous form with molded lip and ear handles. 17.5"h.

Condition: Very good with some stains.

Sold at Conestoga Auctions March 12, 2016.

Estimate: $500-1,000

Price Realized: $1,600 (Does not include buyer's premium)


GAUDY DUTCH SOFT PASTE CHINA BUTTERFLY PATTERN PLATE, 8,625" diameter.

Condition: Very good with minor scratches.

Sold at Conestoga Auctions March 12, 2016.

Estimate: $100-300

Price Realized: $700 (Does not include buyer's premium)


PENNSYLVANIA 19th CENTURY TOLEWARE DOME LID DOCUMENT BOX. Polychrome floral and foliate decoration with facing birds on front panel, yellow trim highlights on black japanned ground. Hinged lid with Brass bail handle. 6.5"h. x 9.5"w. x 5.25"d.

Condition: Good with surface wear, Paint loss, hasp and keeper are missing.

Sold at Conestoga Auctions March 12, 2016.

Estimate: $100-300

Price Realized: $650 (Does not include buyer's premium)


NEEDLE WORK AND CROSS STITCH SHOW TOWEL, signed Susanna Brubacher, 1844. Bold cross stitch needlework of peacocks, potted tulips and floral devices. 63" x 18" not including fringe.

Condition: Very good with minor wear and staining.

Sold at Conestoga Auctions March 12, 2016.

Estimate: $50-150

Price Realized: $450 (Does not include buyer's premium)


IMPORTANT ATTRIBUTABLE GEORGE BRIGHT QUEEN ANNE PERIOD BLACK WALNUT DRESSING TABLE/LOWBOY, Boston, Massachusetts, ca 1735-1755 b with concave carved center drawer, blocked lower apron & original brasses, molded top & drops in fantastic old surface - 31" case width (on a scale of 1-10 this is a 10!)

Sold at Stanton Auctions March 19, 2016.

Estimate: $10,000-15,000

Price Realized: $10,000 (Does not include buyer's premium)


RARE AND WONDERFUL FORM PERIOD QUEEN ANNE CARVED THREE PART SECRETARY ON FRAME, Hartford, Connecticut, ca 1745-1765, with original period brasses, ampitheatre interior with writing well & land deed from the family it descended in - 82.5" tall x 34.5" case width.

Sold at Stanton Auctions March 19, 2016.

Estimate: $10,000-20,000

Price Realized: $10,000 (Does not include buyer's premium)


VERY RARE AND IMPORTANT CHIPPENDALE PERIOD MAHOGANY CHEST ON CHEST, ca 1760-1775, Charleston, South Carolina, attributable to the work shop of Thomas Elfe - see Samuel A. Humphrey and Thomas Elfe Cabinet Maker (identical chest on the cover) This chest features original brasses, locks & key with Cypress secondary wood & Chinese Chippendale lazy eight blind fretwork - upper case width 40.75" - lower case width 43" - 76" tall.

Sold at Stanton Auctions March 19, 2016.

Estimate: $30,000-50,000

Price Realized: $35,000 (Does not include buyer's premium)


EXTREMELY FINE AND RARE PERIOD CHIPPENDALE CARVED MAHOGANY PIE CRUST TILT TOP TALON FTD TEA TABLE, ca 1755-1775 Charleston, South Carolina

Sold at Stanton Auctions March 19, 2016.

Estimate: $18,000-25,000

Price Realized: $16,000 (Does not include buyer's premium)


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