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TWO HEART SHAPED WALLPAPER BOXES, 19th Century.

Condition: Wear.

Sold at Pook and Pook September 12. 2019.

Estimate: $100-200

Price Realized: $1,625


PENNSYLVANIA LIDDED RYE STRAW BASKET, 19th c., 12" h., 18" w.

Condition:Scattered losses.

Sold at Pook and Pook September 12. 2019.

Estimate: $80-120

Price Realized: $463
CAST IRON HERB GRINDER, 19TH C. TOGETHER WITH A WROUGHT IRON SPATULA WITH HEART CUTOUTS, 20th c.

Condition: Good condition. No apparent damages or repairs.

Sold at Pook and Pook September 12. 2019.

Estimate: $80-120

Price Realized: $825
ENGLISH EARTHENWARE BLUE SPATTER HANDLELESS CUP AND SAUCER,; with windmill motif in black, blue, orange and red, 3.75"d, 2.5"h cup; 5.75"d, 1.25"h saucer; ca. 1840.

Condition: good.

Sold at Horst Auctions September 13, 2019.

Price Realized: $1,500


SCARCE ENGLISH STAFFORDSHIRE EARTHENWARE BLUE & YELLOW RAINBOW SPATTER WASTE BOWL WITH TULIP MOTIF IN BLACK, BLUE, GREEN AND RED, 6.5"d, 3.25"h; ca. 1840.

Condition: good

Sold at Horst Auctions September 13, 2019.

Price Realized: $9,600


SCARCE ENGLISH STAFFORDSHIRE EARTHENWARE HANDLELESS CUP AND SAUCER IN FESTOON DRAPE MOTIF IN GREEN, RED AND YELLOW SPATTER, 3.75"d, 2.25"h cup; 5"d, 1.25"h saucer; ca. 1840.

Condition: flea bite flake on cup foot ring.

Sold at Horst Auctions September 13, 2019.

Price Realized: $1,300


ENGLISH STAFFORDSHIRE EARTHENWARE HANDLELESS CUP AND SAUCER IN RED SPATTER WITH BELL FLOWER TYPE DESIGN COLORED IN BLACK, BLUE RED AND BROWNISH-YELLOW, 4"d, 2.25"h cup; 6"d, 1.25"h saucer; ca. 1840.

Condition: good.

Sold at Horst Auctions September 13, 2019.

Price Realized: $1,350


FINE ENGLISH STAFFORDSHIRE EARTHENWARE THREE COLOR SCHOOLHOUSE SPATTER TODDY PLATE IN BLACK, GREEN AND RED, 5”d; ca. 1840.

Condition: good.

Sold at Horst Auctions September 13, 2019.

Price Realized: $2,750


SCARCE PENNSYLVANIA COVERED URN SHAPED REDWARE JAR, with manganese sponging on an olive lead glaze with slight brown collar, impressed "I Feeg" (Joseph Feeg, Womelsdorf, PA) and incised "13"; rounded cupped rim with lid ledge within mouth, everted neck, incised collar ring and four incised shoulder rings, tooled foot and close fitting disk lid with deeply cupped knob, 5"d, 7.5"h; ca. 1860.

Condition: .75” chip & small flakes on knob; glaze losses on jar's rim; Feeg was Willoughy Smith's predecessor.

Sold at Horst Auctions September 13, 2019.

Price Realized: $3,900


SCARCE ENGLISH STAFFORDSHIRE PEARLWARE GAUDY DUTCH STRAW FLOWER PLATE, with double border of a connecting yellow string of heart like dots on blue and an undulating reddish line and impressed on reverse "Riley", 9.75"d; ca. 1825;

Condition: discolored.

Sold at Horst Auctions September 13, 2019.

Price Realized: $1,100




BLOWN STIEGEL TYPE COLORLESS GLASS (HALF POST METHOD) ENAMELED COLOGNE BOTTLE, with applied pewter rim with cap, elongated octagonal base, polychromal decorations, one long side with spurred boot and date 1747; the opposite side with legend "VIVAT/Meister/Schumacher" (Long live master Schumacker), other surfaces with typical enameled motifs, scarred base, 5.25"x 2"x 2.5"; ca. 1747.

Condition: good.

Sold at Horst Auctions September 13, 2019.

Price Realized: $1,500


SMALL ROUND TAPER SIDED BOWL, with round collared rim, coggled shoulder band of diagonal striations, tan-brown lead glaze with splashes of thick iron glazing, impressed on base "IS Henne" (Joseph S. Henne, Upper Tulpehocken Twp, PA), 4"d, 2"h; ca. 1850.

Condition: considerable glaze losses on rim & some elsewhere.

Sold at Horst Auctions September 13, 2019.

Price Realized: $2,200


FINE ENGLISH STAFFORDSHIRE EARTHENWARE SOUP TUREEN UNDER TRAY, with blue ink back stamp of spread eagle "E Pluribus Unum" banner and "Hope Mill Catskill/ State of New York", oval ridged tray with pair o shell form ends and oval central design within a shell border, 1.25"x 9.25"x 12"; ca. 1825

Condition: good.

Sold at Horst Auctions September 14, 2019.

Price Realized: $1,600


DATED, ATTRIBUTED TO ABRAHAM W. HEEBNER SCHOOL (OR FAMILY), INITIALED BY ARTIST S.L.H. ON LAID PAPER OF A SMALL BOOKPLATE OF A BOY ON HIS GOAT WEARING A VET, LONG TROUSERS, OVERCOAT AND HOLDING A WHIP, done in ink entitled "Tom On His Goat", watercolor and polychrome accented dated 1831 and initialed, 7"x 7" framed; ca. 1831.

Condition: Paper was folded & kept in books; appears with creasing but otherwise very good; Note Moyer Book "Fraktur Writings & Folk Art Drawings of Schwenkfelder Library" pg. 14 with similar piece attributed to Abraham W. Heebner, though initials may indicate another artist (possibly Susanna L. Heebner).

Sold at Horst Auctions September 14, 2019.

Price Realized: $1,500


CHEST OF DRAWERS IN WALNUT WITH A MOLDED TOP OVER TWO DRAWERS OVER THREE DRAWERS WITH DROP PULLS, molded recessed sides resting on large bulbous feet in front and straight feet in rear, 21.75"x 23.25"x 41"; ca. 1760.

Condition: pulls replaced, some later repairs throughout evidenced by hot glue marks.

Sold at Horst Auctions September 14, 2019.

Price Realized: $8,800


AMERICAN SCHOOL, HUDSON RIVER LANDSCAPE, American, 19th century. Oil on canvas, housed in a gilt oval frame, unsigned; 21 x 26 in. (sight), 30 x 34 in (frame).

Sold at Cowan’s Auction September 27, 2019.

Estimate: $400-600

Price Realized: $2,176


GEORGE INNES (AMERICAN, 1825-1894), THE WATERING HOLE, 1850, signed LL, framed. 15 x 21.25 in. (sight), 6 x 22 in. (canvas), 24.5 x 30.75 in. (frame).

Sold at Cowan’s Auction September 28, 2019.

Estimate: $30,000-50,000

Price Realized: $45,000


RARE CHIPPENDALE SIDE CHAIRS, Attributed to Daniel Trotter, American (Philadelphia), ca 1780. A pair of Chippendale side chairs attributed to Daniel Trotter, each having four pierced splats with central carved plume, straight stiles topped with foliate carving, an upholstered seat having mortise joint side seat rails, rising on straight Marlborough legs with stretcher support; ht. 38, wd. 22, dp. 20.5 in. (each).

Condition: Item is in good overall condition. Refinished.

Sold at Cowan’s Auction September 28, 2019.

Estimate: $4,000-6,000

Price Realized: $8,750


ANDREW CLEMENS SAND BOTTLE, Andrew Clemens (American, 1857-1894). A large sand bottle decorated on one side with a spread-winged eagle beneath a thirty-six star flag and a fine urn of flowers to the other beneath the name Miss Kate Moore, all within layered, colored sands in geometric patterns, with partial worn label to top of stopper; ht. 8.75 in.

Provenance:Inherited from original owner and thence by descent.

Sold at Cowan’s Auction September 28, 2019.

Estimate: $30,000-50,000

Price Realized: $100,000


VOLUME OF EARLY ST. LOUIS AND PITTSBURGH ALMANACS, including the first one issued in St. Louis. 21 almanacs bound in one volume. 12mo, contemporary 1/4 calf, worn, front board coming detached; contents variously dampstained, browned, marked, or worn; signatures of publisher Joseph Charless and others on several title pages, other early owner's signatures on endpapers, later bookseller's tag on front pastedown. Pittsburgh, PA and St. Louis, MO, [1813-1833].

The highlight of this volume is Charless' "Missouri & Illinois Magazine Almanac, for 1818," the first almanac published in Missouri territory. Complete in 60 pages, it is signed by the publisher Joseph Charless on the title page. In addition to the usual calendar pages, it includes tables of officers, courts, fines, and attorneys for Missouri Territory; courts and court officers in Illinois Territory; recent acts of Congress regarding Missouri land settlement and bounty claims; and 5 pages of description of the towns in Missouri Territory. Drake's Almanacs of the United States (#4552) lists only 4 examples of this historic issue, 2 of them being imperfect. Only one other has been traced on the market, in the Midland Books catalog for 1956.

Next in the volume is the even scarcer second St. Louis almanac issued by Charless for 1819. Drake traced no surviving copies of the 1819 almanac, although its existence was inferred from a newspaper advertisement. It is apparently also complete at 60 pages. Also included are the 1822 Cummins' Missouri and Illinois Almanac, followed by a consecutive run of 12 Charless' Missouri Almanacs from 1823 to 1834, most of them complete. Drake was unable to trace any examples of 6 of these later Charless almanacs (1826, 1827, 1828, 1829, 1832, and 1834), again inferring their existence from advertisements. Copies of some of these have since been traced in libraries (the 1819 at the Huntington, and 1827 through 1829 recently acquired by the American Antiquarian Society), but they remain quite scarce. Rounding out the volume are 6 Pittsburgh almanacs for 1814-17 and 1820-21, most of them incomplete.

The early history of this volume can be told with unusual precision. Joseph Charless (1772-1834) was a pioneer printer in Pennsylvania, Kentucky and Missouri Territory. He arrived in St. Louis in 1808 as the town's first printer. A reasonable hypothesis for this volume would be that as Charless began to contemplate the creation of Missouri's first almanac, he acquired the run of 4 Pittsburgh almanacs for 1814 to 1817; he or his son Edward signed all 4, although they were not the publishers. Bound next are the first two Charless' Almanacs for 1818 and 1819; the first apparently signed by Joseph as his personal copy. The little collection next passed to B. Allen of St. Louis, whose signatures appear in many of the almanacs dated 1825 to 1834. This was apparently the early St. Louis attorney Beverly Allen (1800-1845), who came to town in 1827. Allen apparently added two partial Pittsburgh almanacs from 1820 and 1821 for completeness, and the St. Louis Cummins almanac for 1822, before completing the run with Charless almanacs through 1834. The next owner was John McAuley Eager (1817-1869), who signed the first almanac and the binding; he came to St. Louis to practice law in 1841 and returned to his native New York in 1852. He soon sold the book through the New York book dealers Lewis & Blood, a partnership which ended in 1857; their book tag appears on the front pastedown. William C. Shelton was apparently the next owner, signing the flyleaf.

Sold at Swann Auction Galleries September 26, 2019.

Estimate: $4,000-6,000

Price Realized: $27,500






FOLIO FIRST EDITION (AMERICAN INDIANS.) MCKENNEY, THOMAS L.; AND HALL, JAMES. HISTORY OF THE INDIAN TRIBES OF NORTH AMERICA. 120 hand-colored lithograph plates, 17 pages of facsimile subscriber signatures. [2], 4, 206; [2], 237; [4], 196, [2] pages. 3 volumes. Folio, contemporary 1/2 morocco gilt, worn, crude repairs to joints, backstrips coming detached; rehinged, intermittent foxing and wear, early repairs to a few leaves including first frontispiece plate, lacks the map sheet and binder's slip; early 20th century owner's inscriptions on flyleaves and versos of frontispieces, with related 1920 letter laid in. Philadelphia: Daniel Rice & J.G. Clarke, [1842], [1842], [1844].

FIRST EDITION, final state. McKenney compiled this work after serving as the United States Superintendent of Indian Affairs through 1830. It is most famous for its lithographs after the work of Charles Bird King, who had been commissioned by McKenney to paint portraits of American Indian delegates visiting Washington from 1821 to 1830. "The most colorful portraits of Indians ever executed"--Howes M129 ("b," describing this Rice printing as a reprint). "The grandest color plate book issued in the United States up to the time of its publication, and one of the most important of the century"--Reese, American Color Plate Books 24. BAL 6934 (source for collation; title pages in States E, C, and B); Sabin 43410a.

Provenance: Given in 1901 by a friend to Henry Richard Goetchius (1852-1925), a lawyer of Columbus, GA, who inscribed these volumes in 1901 and 1921. His home and library (presumably containing this set) were inherited by his niece Mary McKinley Wellborn and her husband Samuel Marshall Wellborn (1869-1949). The Wellborns sold the largely intact library to Charles Dexter Jordan Sr. (1898-1985) of Columbus (see the guide to the Dexter Jordan Papers at the Columbus State University Archives). This volume was purchased by the consignor from an Atlanta dealer circa the late 1980s.

Sold at Swann Auction Galleries September 26, 2019.

Estimate: $25,000-35,000

Price Realized: $30,000


PRICE, RICHARD. OBSERVATIONS ON THE IMPORTANCE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 87, [1] pages. 8vo, disbound; minor dampstaining on top edge; early owner's signature on title page. Boston: Powars and Willis, 1784.

FIRST AMERICAN EDITION of a tract by an ardent British supporter of America. Price congratulates the victorious former colonists, stating that the Revolution "opens a new prospect in human affairs, and begins a new era in the history of mankind." Originally intended only to be published in America; the threat of a pirated British edition prompted a London 1784 edition which preceded this one. A long letter from the French economist Anne Robert Jacques Turgot, supporting Price's conclusions, appears as an appendix. Evans 18739; Howes P585; Sabin 65449. Provenance: from the stock of Ernest Wessen's Midland Books; see his 1947 catalogue #38, item 235.

Sold at Swann Auction Galleries September 26, 2019.

Estimate: $400-600

Price Realized: $2,750






SHUGART FAMILY PAPERS INCLUDING DOCUMENTATION ON THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD. 63 items in one box, 0.4 linear feet; various sizes and conditions. Account book: 105 manuscript pages, 4to, original 1/4 sheep, moderate wear, several pages loose, a few apparently excised prior to numbering. Vp, 1838-81 and undated.

Zachariah Taylor Shugart (1805-1881) was born a Quaker in North Carolina, and spent most of his early years in Indiana before settling in Cass County, Michigan in 1840; he moved on to Iowa in 1853. Shugart was a known active participant in the Underground Railroad circa 1840 to 1851, as cited in "History of Tama County, Iowa" page 1053 and in Snodgrass, "The Underground Railroad: An Encyclopedia," page 483-4. A dramatic account of one 1847 case known as the "Kentucky Raid" is told in the 1882 "History of Cass County, Michigan," pages 109-115.

The central item in this lot is an account book kept by Shugart from 1838 to 1852 which details his involvement in the Underground Railroad. Dated in the Quaker style, it begins while Shugart was still in Indiana, but most of the entries date from his time in Michigan. A section from pages 96 to 101 and 104 is headed "Runaway Negroes." It runs to 107 entries from 1841 to 1843 and then undated. Many of the early entries give complete names, tending toward increasing anonymity as the list went on, ranging from "Samuel Strawther" to "Ellen Something" to "Daniel" to "Something." Among the more evocative names given are "North Star" and "General W. Hampton." Several entries include families, such as "Nelly Rix, 2 ch" or "Patience, 5 children." Each entry is marked either "s" or "w"; we can only guess that these may have denoted the next destination on the route.

Numerous other entries suggest connections to Shugart's Railroad activities. Stephen Bogue, Shugart's main local collaborator in Cass County, appears on pages 16-17, 90-91 and 103 with accounts dated 1844 and 1848. The 1850 census shows a John Watkins living with the Shugarts, described as a mulatto shoemaker aged 24 and born in Virginia. This is likely the J.D. Watkins whose account fills pages 48-49 and 60-65. Watkins paid his board from 1850 to 1852 by making and repairing shoes for local townspeople; a note on page 104 reads "Moved J.D. Watkins shop, 7th mo 1st 1851." On page 88 is a long listing of legal expenses in which Shugart attended court, obtained subpoenas for witnesses, and paid lawyers from November 1850 to June 1851. These expenses likely relate to his prosecution by Kentucky slaveholders for his central role in thwarting the 1847 Kentucky raid, in which he had actively resisted a group of kidnappers and helped dozens of escaped slaves on their way to Canada. Josiah Osborn, another key figure who helped thwart the Kentucky Raid, is mentioned on page 100.

The other highlight of the collection is a group of 7 letters to Zachariah Shugart from his son Joseph R. Shugart (1842-1864), then serving as a soldier in the 28th Iowa Infantry. Most notable is a 27 May 1863 letter which describes the Battle of Champion's Hill, where he was wounded. The rebels "turned on us with about 5 to our one & were about to outflank us & surround us, so we had to retreat in hast. . . . The 28th Iowa & 46 Indiana broke & run as if the devil was after them. We retreated across an open field about 50 or 60 rodds. As I was on retreat I got shot with a rifle ball through the lower part of the mussle of my arm. . . . That battle is called the Battle of Champion Hills & it is said to be the hardest battle ever fought in America for the time it lasted." His last letter, dated 17 October 1864, complains of the 43rd Battalion of Virginia Cavalry, better known as Mosby's Raiders: "Colonel Mosbey has a band of gorillas of about 500, they are all mounted on good horses. They will make a dash upon our train and burn & capture as much as they can & if they catch any of our men, they will rob them of all they have & strip them & sometimes kill them." Enclosed with the letter is a swatch of fabric, described as "a piece of our old banner." Shugart would be killed just two days later at the Battle of Cedar Creek; the original newspaper clipping listing him among the dead is included.

Also included are a pocket diary kept by Zachariah Shugart in January-September 1867 while running a drug store in Belle Plaine, Iowa near Cedar Rapids. On 7 January he noted "about 4 hundred soldiers on the cars bound for the Indian country." His 10-page bound travel narrative from September-October 1880 documents a trip from Belle Plaine to attend Quaker meetings. He notes with some bemusement "Preaching. Praying. Talking & much singing. Not much like the Quakers in Fox's day!" A large collection of photographs, 46 loose and 42 in an album, are mostly unidentified; many bear backmarks from Iowa photographers. Formats range from cartes-de-visite to cabinet cards to tintypes to one cased daguerreotype. One unmarked photograph can be identified as Zachariah Shugart, whose distinctive hairstyle and beard as seen in other photographs would never again be replicated until early 21st-century Brooklyn. Provenance: the account book bears an inscription stating that it was given in May 1881 by Zachariah Shugart's widow Susannah to her grandson Grant Overturf (1868-1936).



Taken as a whole, we don't know of any other Underground Railroad documents at auction that have approached the extent or detail of Zachariah Shugart's account book. Offered in the context of Shugart's other personal papers, its authenticity and power are beyond question.

Sold at Swann Auction Galleries September 26, 2019.

Estimate: $30,000-40,000

Price Realized: $100,000


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