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RARE AND IMPORTANT CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY "FRENCH" CHAIR, CA. 1770, with carved grips and molded square legs. Illustrated in E. Milby Burton, Charleston Furniture 1700-1825, fig.109. A matching chair with a history of ownership in a Charleston family is mentioned on page 53. A related "French" chair was sold at Christie's, January 21, 2006, lot 533.

Provenance: Reginald Lewis, Easton, Maryland; Joe Kindig Jr. & Son, 1988; The Collection of Daniel Heisler and Mary Jane Sheppard, Lutherville, MD.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $20,000-40,000
Price Realized: $85,400

PHILADELPHIA CHIPPENDALE WALNUT DRESSING TABLE, CA., 1765, the molded top over a case, with a shell carved drawer and fluted quarter columns, the scrolled apron with central applied shell, supported by cabriole legs terminating in voluted trifid feet, 30" h., 31.75" w.

Provenance: The Estate of Marguerite R. McCreery, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania; Joe Kindig Jr. & Son, 1985; The Collection of Daniel Heisler and Mary Jane Sheppard, Lutherville, MD.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $10,000-15,000

Price Realized: $19,520


IMPORTANT PHILADELPHIA CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY PIE CRUST TEA TABLE, CA. 1750, 27.75" h., 31.25" w. This mahogany, inverted baluster, scalloped top tea table with claw feet and carved knees is an important early Philadelphia example. This inverted baluster form apparently was one of the original formats for the introduction of the tripod tea table in Philadelphia, probably in the late 1730’s or early 1740’s. The first of these tables likely saw the introduction of the claw and ball foot. This example shows that form as it began to evolve and is about five to fifteen years later than the earliest examples, such as the Bayou Bend table. While this table retains the early double batten system for attaching the top to the bird cage so that the grain of the top is vertical when the top is in its upright, storage position and has the typical twelve repeats of the scrolled elements of its top edge, its knee carving and feet are more typical of the 1745-55 phase of production. The carver, whose name is not now known, was an important and prolific carver of that era and later. The turned inverted baluster shaft is the most complex example of its type known to me. Typical of these early scalloped top tables, the edge molding is very precisely carved. The table is in very good condition, with its original latch and most of its original batten screws. Report from Alan Miller

Provenance: George Horace Lorimer; Joe Kindig Jr. & Son, 1994; The Collection of Daniel Heisler and Mary Jane Sheppard, Lutherville, MD.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $20,000-40,000

Price Realized: $97,600


IMPORTANT PHILADELPHIA CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY GAMES TABLE, CA. 1765, the carving attributed to Martin Jugiez, the turret top over a conforming case with a single drawer, supported by carved cabriole legs terminating in ball and claw feet, 28.5" h., 33.5" w.

Provenance: Christie's 1990: The Collection of May Joynt, lot 486; Joe Kindig Jr. & Son, 1992; The Collection of Daniel Heisler and Mary Jane Sheppard, Lutherville, MD.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $20,000-40,000

Price Realized: $29,280


DELICATE NEW ENGLAND SHERATON PAINTED PINE AND BASSWOOD WASHSTAND, CA. 1820, retaining its original red top with white frame and floral highlights, 36" h., 15.25" w.

Provenance: The Collection of Daniel Heisler and Mary Jane Sheppard, Lutherville, MD.

Condition: Overall very good condition with some wear to top and lower shelf.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $3,172


PENNSYLVANIA CONESTOGA WAGON BOX LID, CA. 1800, with original wrought iron hardware, 8" h., 15/25" w.

Provenance: Estate of August Knapp, Hudson, Ohio.

Condition: Good condition. No apparent damages or repairs.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $1,000-1,500

Price Realized: $2,684


TWO RED SPATTER PLATES, with star, 8.25" diameter.

Provenance: From a prominent Montgomery County, Pennsylvania Collector.

Condition: Very good condition. No apparent damages or repairs.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $400-800

Price Realized: $2,196


PAINTED PINE WORK TABLE, EARLY 19TH C. with a single drawer and scalloped sides, 33.5" h., 57.5" w.

Provenance: An Arizona collection.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $500-1,000

Price Realized: $3,660


LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA PAINTED PINE TWO-PART ARCHITECTURAL CORNER CUPBOARD, CA. 1785, with a dentil molded cornice over a glazed door flanked by paneled pilasters, resting on a base with a raised panel door, retaining an old green and brown surface, 80.52" h., 48" w

Provenance: Dr. and Mrs. Donald Shelley, Titus Geesey, Edgar and Charlotte Sittig; A prominent Delaware collector.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $8,000-12,000

Price Realized: $23,180


CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY DROP-LEAF DINING TABLE, CA. 1770, with rare carved hairy paw feet, 28" h., 18.25" w., 47.5" d.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $7,930


NEW ENGLAND PAINTED BENTWOOD SUGA BOX, 19TH C., with swing handle, retaining its original decorated surface, 7.25" h., 12.25" w.

Condition: Good condition with minor wear.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $1,000-1,500

Price Realized: $2,684


SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAM AND MARY OAK WAINSCOT ARMCHAIR, CA. 1730, with a carved crest, paneled back and plank seat, supported by turned front legs joined by medial stretcher. A very similar chair was sold at Pook & Pook, Pioneer Collection of Dr. and Mrs. Donald Shelley, lot 55, April 2007.

Provenance: A prominent Delaware collector.

Condition: Finish darkened and evened out. Seat replaced.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $8,000-12,000

Price Realized: $8,540


LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAM AND MARY WALNUT BLANKET CHEST, CA. 1755, 24" h., 48" w.

Provenance: A prominent Delaware collector

.

Condition: 48" w. x 21.5" d. (body), 51" x 23/5 (top). Condition not examined.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $500-800

Price Realized: $2,440


JOHANN HEINRICH OTTO (SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA ACTIVE 1762-1797), PRINTED AND HAND COLORED FRAKTUR, of a bird piercing its breast, 7.75 x 6.25”.

Provenance: A prominent Delaware collector.

Condition: Significant restoration to edges.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $800-1,000

Price Realized: $6,100


IMPORTANT OHIO PAINTED PINE AND POPLAR BLANKET CHEST, MID 19TH C., the front initialed SC, over three blue panels with potted tulips, above three drawers all surrounded by geometric stencils, 30" h., 50" w. Two related chests are in the Ohio Historical Society and are illustrated in Fabian The Pennsylvania German Decorated Chest figs. 42 and 43.

Provenance: Descended in the Calloway family to the present owner.

Condition:Wear to lid. Loss to side lid molding. Pulls replaced.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $10,000-15,000

Price Realized: $9,760


SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA INK AND WATERCOLOR FRAKTUR BOOKPLATE, DATED 1787, 6" x 3.5”.

Condition: Not laid down. A few very small spots backed to secure tears at bottom edge. Good condition with minor staining. Light crease along bottom.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $1,000-1,500

Price Realized: $3,904


WILHELM SCHIMMEL (CUMBERLAND COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA 1817-1890), CARVED AND PAINTED SPREAD WINGED EAGLE, retaining its original polychrome decoration and remaining in excellent original condition, 8.375" h., 15.5" w.

Provenance: Robert Burkhardt, Lancaster, Pennsylvania; A prominent Montgomery County, Pennsylvania collector.

Condition: Minor touch-up to gesso where wings meet body. Otherwise in very good condition. No other apparent damages or repairs.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 4, 2019.

Estimate: $40,000-60,000

Price Realized: $58,560


PENNSYLVANIA WALNUT SPLAY LEG STAND, LATE 18TH C. with pad feet, 28.5”H., 20" w.

Provenance: A prominent Delaware collector.

Condition: Good condition. No apparent damages or repairs.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 5, 2019.

Estimate: $2,000-3,000

Price Realized: $7,930


PAINTED CHALKWARE BELSNICKLE, 19TH C., holding a feather tree sprig, 14.5" h.

Provenance: A Maryland collection.

Condition:Tree is a replacement, sporadic surface abrasions, small base rim chips.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 5, 2019.

Estimate: $600-900

Price Realized: $1,830


BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA REDWARE PIE PLATE, 19TH C., attributed to Dryville Pottery, with green and brown slip tulip decoration, 8.5" diameter. For further reference, see Robacker Arts of the Pennsylvania Dutch, pg. 109 and Magazine Antiques, January 1990, Berks County Redware Pottery.



Provenance: The Collection of Anne and J. Jefferson Miller, Pook and Pook Auction, April, 2015, lot 1033; R. H. Wood, 1972; A Maryland collection.

Condition:Several small edge chips and flakes.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 5, 2019.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $2,440


PENNSYLVANIA REDWARE PIE PLATE, 19TH C., attributed to Diehl Pottery, with green, brown and cream slip floral decoration, 8" diameter.

Provenance: The Collection of Anne and J. Jefferson Miller, Pook and Pook Auction, April, 2015, lot 1257; R. H. Wood; A Maryland collection.

Condition:1" hairline to rim, very small minor edge flakes.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 5, 2019.

Estimate: $1,500-2,500

Price Realized: $4,148


RARE MINIATURE PENNSYLVANIA CHIPPENDALE WALNUT SLANT FRONT DESK, LATER 18TH C., with a fitted interior and four drawers, flanked by fluted quarter columns supported by ogee bracket feet, 18" h., 12.25" w.

Provenance: A Reading, Pennsylvania collection.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 5, 2019.

Estimate: $6,000-9,000
Price Realized: $14,640

NEW ENGLAND WILLIAM AND PARY GREAT CHAIR, EARLY 18TH C.

Provenance: A Chester County, Pennsylvania estate.

Condition: Small repaired break to top of stile. Otherwise in good condition. No other apparent condition issues.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 5, 2019.

Estimate: $2,000-4,000

Price Realized: $4,148


NEW ENGLAND CHROME YELLOW PAINTED PANTRY BOX, 19TH C., 2.5" h., 5.25" diameter.

Provenance: A Maryland collection.

Condition: Excellent untouched condition.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 5, 2019.

Estimate: $800-1,200

Price Realized: $3,904


QUEEN ANNE PAINTED PINE AND POPLAR SPLAY LEG TABLE, LATE 18TH C., retaining an old scrubbed blue surface, 29" h., 34" w.

Provenance: A prominent Delaware collector.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 5, 2019.

Estimate: $500-1,000

Price Realized: $6,710


CONNECTICUT PILGRIM CENTURY JOINED OAK SUNFLOWER CHEST, CA. 1700, attributed to the shop of Peter Blin, Wethersfield, the lift lid over a case adorned with carved panels and applied half columns, 39,75” h., 44.75" w.

Provenance: A Long Island, New York estate.

Condition: Underside of lid is oiled, but lid is original. A few applied moldings possibly replaced. Nice old surface.

Sold at Pook and Pook October 5, 2019.

Estimate: $8,000-12,000

Price Realized: $11,590


IMPORTANT AND PROBABLY UNIQUE OVERSIZED STONEWARE FACE HARVEST JUG WITH TWO-COLOR GLAZE, Edgefield District, SC, circa 1840-1875, wheel-thrown, domed form with applied tubular pouring spout and arched handle across the top, decorated with a hand-modeled and applied clay face including bulging kaolin eyes with pierced pupils set within open lids, raised eyebrows, a well-sculpted nose with carved nostrils, large ears with tragi, and wide mouth bearing deeply-carved kaolin teeth. The surface of the vessel has depressions formed prior to the firing to create a realistic structure to the face, delineating the cheek bones, temples, and jaw line. The surface is decorated with a light-green alkaline glaze streaked with a reddish-brown, iron-rich slip. This same slip decoration accents the face's pupils.

This important new discovery is distinguished from the surviving body of Edgefield face jugs by two significant attributes: its size and glaze. It is among the largest Edgefield face jugs known, measuring one gallon or more in capacity, and is comparable in size to the iconic signed Thomas Chandler face jug, recognized as the largest known. Secondly, this work is among the few examples that we have seen among the roughly two-hundred known Edgefield face vessels that is decorated with iron slip along with its alkaline glaze. This treatment, while commonly seen in the decorative motifs of Phoenix Factory, Thomas Chandler, and Collin Rhodes pottery, is extremely rare in Edgefield face vessel production, typically indicative of early-period works. An early face jug and face sherd, both attributed to Thomas Chandler at Phoenix Factory, circa 1840, exhibit iron slip highlights to the eyes, eyebrows, and/or face. A third, attributed to Chandler at the Trapp and Chandler site, circa 1845-1848, reveals iron slip highlights to the handle and eyes. In the case of this recently-discovered example an Albany-type slip has been poured over the surface and brushed onto the kaolin eyes to accent the incised pupils. The eye decoration, noted in early Chandler-attributed face vessels, treatment can also be seen on his signed face jug. Additionally, this jug's maker has wax resist around the lips and sporadically applied across the surface in a splashed manner, revealing the vessel's distinctive local clay. Imposing in size and expressive in its sculpting and glaze treatment, this work is regarded as one of the most outstanding Edgefield face vessels in existence.

Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, which recently surfaced in New York State. A note card found with the jug from the consignor's grandmother, an avid collector, states: "Purchased from Vern House Antiques, Croton-on-Hudson, 1964. Two at Ford Museum, three at Ohio State Museum. Excellent. Paid $87.50”.

Literature: For related use of iron slip on an Edgefield face vessel, see Wingard, "From Baltimore to South Carolina: Thomas Chandler's Influence on 19th-Century Stoneware", Ceramics in America 2013, figs. 52, 54-56.

Condition: excellent condition with a shallow flake to one ear, and minor chip to other ear, the bottom edge of the jug with some in-the-firing flakes and adhered kiln residue. H 10.75" ; W (from ear to ear) 10.5”.

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019.

Price Realized: $28,270


RARE AND IMPORTANT GLAZED REDWARE DISH WITH FOUR-COLOR SLIP DECORATION, attributed to the Albright/Loy Family, Alamance County, NC, late 18th or early 19th century, shallow dish with flared and rounded rim, the interior coated in a distinctive black manganese slip, decorated around the rim area with white-and-orange-slip drape, tassel, and spot motifs; interior center decorated in copper, white, and orange slips with a series of spots and banding surrounding a stylized flower blossom, further decorated around the cavetto with alternating white and copper slip banding. This dish's swag-and-tassel motif can be related to popular Federal designs of the period seen on everything from furniture to textiles to pottery, including those adorning stoneware pieces by Manhattan's Thomas Commeraw and Clarkson Crolius, Sr., among others. Its black-slip background overlain with slipwork is highly distinctive to the region, rarely seen in the work of other early American redware potteries.

Several of the earliest examples of documented Alamance County redware feature a dark background in this manner, suggesting this work was also made relatively early in the existence of this potting school, shortly before or after the year 1800. Few North Carolina redware objects of this quality are made available for sale on the open market, as most currently reside in museum collections. This bowl is the first example that we have offered featuring the region's classic, black-glazed surface.

Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, from a New England private collection.

Condition: Strong condition for redware of this origin and age, with some wear to interior and a few shallow rim chips. Diameter 11" ; H 1.75”.

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019.

Price Realized: $22,420


EXCEEDINGLY RARE AND IMPORTANT FOUR-GALLON STONEWARE JAR WITH COBALT ROOSTER DECORATION, Stamped "J. YOUNG & CO. / HARRISBURG, PA," circa 1856-1858, ovoid jar with tooled shoulder, semi-rounded rim, and applied lug handles, decorated with a large brushed design of a rooster with comb, wattle, and prominent tail, flanked by wreath-like foliate designs. Cobalt highlights to maker's mark, capacity mark, and handle terminals. Featuring one of Harrisburg's rarest bird motifs and an early, short-lived maker's mark, this jar is among the most outstanding examples of Harrisburg stoneware to come to auction in recent years. The wonderful, stylized nature of the design, which includes an extravagant bough-like tail to the rooster, creates a piece with strong folk art appeal. Among the finest figural-decorated examples of John Young stoneware known.

Condition: excellent condition with 2.5" in-the-firing surface line from rim on reverse, not visible on interior, a minor 1" Y-shaped surface line from rim on left side of jar, not visible on interior, a small chip to interior of rim, a small in-the-firing contact mark to far right side of jar's front, and a shallow in-the-firing base chip on right side of jar. A series of short, hand-incised lines on the reverse base area, the purpose of which is unknown, were created with a potter's knife or other tool prior to firing. H 12.5”

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019.

Price Realized: $7,080


EXCEEDINGLY RARE ONE-AND-A-HALF-GALLON STONEWARE JAR WITH COBALT MAIN-IN-THE-MOON SMOKING A PIPE DECORATION, Stamped "COWDEN & WILCOX / HARRISBURG, PA", circa 1865, ovoid jar with tooled shoulder and flattened rim, decorated with a brushed design of a man's face in profile with prominent nose and long-stemmed pipe emitting trails of smoke, surrounded by a crescent-shaped foliate motif. Cobalt highlights to maker's mark and capacity mark. This jar is the only example of this firm's iconic man-in-the-moon design that we have seen depicting the figure smoking a pipe. Coupled with the extreme rarity of the design is an appealing, somewhat-small size to the jar and large coverage of the design of the jar's front.

Provenance: Recently surfaced in the Midwestern U.S.

Condition: Very nice condition with a .875” in-the-firing base chip, which is partially glazed over and a minor flake to bottom edge, visible when the jar is turned over.

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019.

Price Realized: $8,260


POSSIBLY UNIQUE STONEWARE PRESENTATION SYRUP JUG WITH COBALT FLORAL DECORATION, Inscribed "Muncy Pa / Jas. M. Bowman" and "manufd by / J.W. COWDEN / HARRISBURG. PA," circa 1861, unusual, tapering form with angled shoulder, rounded neck molding and pinched pouring spout, decorated with two brushed tulips above the incised and cobalt-highlighted inscription, "Jas. M. Bowman" and "manuf'd by / J.W. COWDEN / HARRISBURG. PA." Raised neck molding incised "Muncy Pa." Cobalt highlights to handle terminals. This stylishly-potted and delicately-inscribed work was made at the John W. Cowden pottery for Muncy, PA merchant, James M. Bowman. The use of hand incising on a piece from this region is extremely rare and its angular form is previously undocumented in Harrisburg stoneware production from this time period. Note the addition of light hand incising to the maker's mark to add to its clarity.

Provenance: From a forty-year Pennsylvania collection

Condition: A thin crack across underside, extending approximately 6.25" up right side of jug. A chip to far right edge of spout. Areas of discoloration to left side of jug. H 11.75”.

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019.

Price Realized: $18,880






EXCEEDINGLY RARE AND IMPORTANT STONEWARE PRESENTATION COOLER WITH ELABORATE INCISED MERMAID AND SEAHORSE MOTIFS, Inscribed "Charles S. Brown / Cornwall / August 15 / 1825", Moses Clark Bell, Cornwall, NY, 1825, ovoid, jug-form cooler with two applied handles and a circular bunghole, one side lavishly-decorated with a large, incised and cobalt-highlighted design of a mermaid beside an incised design of a seahorse. Opposite side decorated with an incised and cobalt-highlighted medallion with foliate embellishments surrounding the inscription, "Charles S. Brown / Cornwall / August 15 / 1825." Additional drape or foliate incising, highlight in cobalt slip, adorns the base of each handle. An incised and cobalt-highlighted square surrounds the bunghole. Brushed cobalt highlights accent the handle terminals. Among the most outstanding examples of incised American stoneware still in private hands, this cooler's mermaid motif is noteworthy for its subject matter, size, detail, and artistic merit. This design, akin in artistic quality to an early 19th century folk portrait, establishes the cooler's maker, Moses Clark Bell, as a true master of his craft.

This cooler's mermaid, profusely-embellished with impressed scales to the body and tail, is easily regarded as the finest representation of this figural motif in early American ceramics. (Other, much-more-simplistic incised "merman" designs can be seen on a select few pieces of William Lundy stoneware from Troy, NY, circa 1825. A third crudely-incised mermaid can be seen on the back of a Manhattan, NY stoneware flask bearing the initials of John Remmey II or III.) The large, curvaceous sea monster, a classical "seahorse" of half-horse and half-fish form, is likewise in its size, subject matter, and bold folk expression. Such seahorse motifs, exceedingly rare in American stoneware, can also be observed in other forms of 19th century American decorative arts, including weathervanes and scrimshaw. Both maritime themes depicted on this cooler are likely linked to the Bell Pottery's location along the Hudson River as well as the association of the cooler form with dispensing water or other liquid. It is difficult to overstate the importance of this object as a representative of the early American stoneware style, where bulbous forms and hand-incised decorations typified the finest examples. This cooler's mermaid motif is among the most outstanding incised designs known on an American stoneware object. Early American ceramic objects of this (and far lesser) quality have been acquired by museums since the early 20th century, making the availability of this masterpiece on the open market a true rarity in today's day and age.

Provenance: Garth's Auction, July 30-31, 2004, lot 45.

Condition: Excellent, essentially as-made condition with a few in-the-firing flaws, including some shallow in-the-firing chipping at base and a .625” iron deposit to shoulder. H 16”.

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019.

Price Realized: $70,800


EXTREMELY RARE AND IMPORTANT LIDDED REDWARE JAR, with Elaborate Slip Foliate Decoration, New England origin, early 19th century, thin-walled, cylindrical jar with footed base, decorated around the body with four brushed manganese fern motifs under a clear lead glaze. Original domed lid features dashed manganese brushwork to the outer edge, swag decoration to the top, and a cross on the knob. Both the underside of the jar and the underside of the lid are incised with a vertical slash, possibly denoting the number "1". New England redware with slip decoration depicting actual subjects (leaves, flowers, figures, etc.) are unusual. This example, retaining its original lid and surviving in remarkable condition despite its delicate potting, is among the finest and most-artistically-decorated New England redware objects that we have ever offered.

Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, from a recently-surfaced Northeastern U.S. collection assembled decades ago. Christopher Huntington Sale, Harrison, Maine, 1974.

Condition: Jar survives in strong condition with shallow chipping around base of jar and some very minor edge wear. Glazed surface survives in exceptional, essentially untouched condition. Lid with a 1.125" chip to flange on underside of lid, along with additional shallow chipping to flange, and a shallow .75” chip to top outer edge of rim. H (including lid) 11”.

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019.

Price Realized: $10,030


EXTREMELY RARE SIX-GALLON STONEWARE COOLER, with Incised Federal Eagle Decoration, Inscribed "Seymour Colvin", Stamped Twice "MOORE & COLVIN / ? O.," Tallmadge, OH origin, circa 1850, ovoid, jug-form cooler with semi-squared rim, open handles, and squared bunghole; front decorated with an incised and cobalt-highlighted Federal eagle design with heart-shaped shield across its chest and stylized olive branch and arrows in its talons. Incised wavy lines surround the design, and the name of the potter, "Seymour Colvin." A brushed foliate design appears below. Cobalt highlights are additionally brushed at the handle terminals, base of spout, and encompassing the bunghole, as well as over the maker's mark and capacity mark. A second Moore & Colvin maker's mark appears on the reverse. Seymour Colvin, his two brothers, Almer and Byron, and various descendants produced stoneware in Northeastern Ohio, West Virginia, and Nebraska. Colvin is perhaps most well known for purchasing J.P. Parker's pottery in Jane Lew, WV in 1876 and establishing an operation there with his sons that would last into the early 20th century. The hand-incised signature on the cooler, an early masterwork by Colvin, indicates the pride he took in this finely potted and decorated creation. A small number of exceptional pieces from the Jane Lew period of Colvin and his sons also feature hand-inscribed signatures brushed in cobalt. Unlike other signed Moore & Colvin pieces from Ohio, the letter "O." for Ohio appears on a second line below the firm name on the front, a trait not seen on Moore & Colvin's typical mark, along with a possible town or county name before it. This cooler is among the most important examples of Ohio stoneware to come to auction in years, combining an iconic American motif with an exceptional form and rare maker's mark. It is believed to be Seymour Colvin's greatest surviving work.

Condition: Excellent condition with a 2.75" vertical hairline at base, continuing approximately 2" onto underside. H 17.5". H 17.5".

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019.

Price Realized: $8,260


RARE SGRAFFITO REDWARE PLATE, with Profuse Heart-and-Floral Decoration, Inscribed "1803", attributed to Conrad Mumbouer, Bucks County, PA, 1803, with coggled edge, the interior coated in yellow slip and decorated with an intricate sgraffito design of six pinwheel-shaped flowers emanating from a heart at the base, all under a clear lead glaze. Excellent detail throughout, including gouged spots throughout flower blossoms as well as crosshatching and spotting to the heart. The date, "1803", is inscribed near the top of the plate. The distinctive style of the plate's floral motifs lead to a strong attribution to Bucks County, PA potter, Conrad Mumbouer, regarded as one of the most important producers of Pennsylvania-German sgraffitoware. A particularly early example by Mumbouer as most of his work appears to date to the 1820s or later, featuring heavy coverage of decoration throughout the plate's surface.

Provenance: A fresh-to-the-market example, from a long-term New England collection; ex-David Ellinger.

Condition: Large section reglued at base of plate, including some small chips along crack line. A few relatively minor flakes to interior. Some very minor, pre-firing flakes to slip at outer edge of plate, which are coated in lead glaze. Diameter 9.375”.

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019.

Price Realized: $2,950




EXCEPTIONAL FOUR-GALLON STONEWARE JAR, with Elaborate Incised Floral Decoration and Crimped Handles, Inscribed "C. Atterbury / August 24th, 1807", Manhattan, NY area, possibly Crolius Family, 1807, ovoid jar with footed base, tooled shoulder, and applied semi-lunate handles with distinctive pinched crimping to their edges. Lavishly-decorated on the front and reverse with an incised and cobalt-highlighted design of a flowering plant bearing a fan-shaped blossom, a round, multi-lobed flower bud or piece of fruit, and several leaves, including a pointed leaf at the stem's peak. Incised in script under one handle with the cobalt-highlighted name, "C. Atterbury," and under the opposite handle with the date, "August 24th 1807". Brushed cobalt slip decorates the juncture of the jar's handles with the shoulder of the vessel. Produced by the same potter who made the iconic "Elizabeth Crane" bowl in the collection of the Museum of American Folk Art and the "Henry Edoson" flask in the Weitsman collection at the New York State Museum. C. Atterbury was quite clearly Catharine Atterbury, born Catharine Boudinot (December 2, 1781), the daughter of Elisha Boudinot, a prominent New Jersey figure in the history of the Revolutionary War and an eventual New Jersey Supreme Court Justice. As the Historical Society of New Jersey notes, "Elisha [Boudinot] and his brother Elias were both early supporters of the Revolution. In 1755, when the patriots of Newark created the General Committee of Newark to organize their efforts, Elisha was made its clerk. He also held the office of Secretary of the Council of Safety in 1778. Boudinot was involved with many important personages of the time and entertained such men as George Washington and Alexander Hamilton at his Newark home." Indeed, it is remarkable that Catharine Atterbury herself had a brush with George Washington that she cherished her entire life: "Mrs. Catharine Boudinot Atterbury remembered with delight during her long life an incident of her childhood connected with Washington. She was about eight years old, and as she was born in 1781, it is supposed to have occurred on the evening after Washington's inauguration. She was with her parents near the Bowling Green, at what was or had once been grandfather William Peartree Smith's house, near Chancellor Livingston's. She had skipped to the crowded street to see a balloon go up in connection with the fire-works, and her father sent her back into the house; but Washington, standing near, exclaimed, 'No, you pretty little yellow bird, you shall see as well as anybody,' and placed her upon his shoulder." (Magazine of American History, May 1889.) As the Historical Society of New Jersey (which holds family papers of the Boudinots, including papers of Catharine Boudinot Atterbury herself) also notes, "While still living at her parent's house in Newark, [Catharine Boudinot] was the secretary for the Newark Female Charitable Society, the second oldest private charitable organization in the country. From her writing, she seems to have been very affected by the religious revival of the time period. She married Lewis Atterbury (1779-1872), a merchant, on September [11], 1803 and had nine children with him: Mary S., Lewis, John, Edward, Elisha Boudinot, Benjamin Bakewell, Julia Maria, William Wallace and Francis." Lewis Atterbury was born on April 2, 1779 in Leicestershire, England, and immigrated to the United States with his uncle, Benjamin Bakewell, in or about 1793. Bakewell himself is extremely notable as the father of the American flint-glass industry, having founded his famous Pittsburgh glasshouse in the early 1800's. Lewis Atterbury, for his part, became a prominent Baltimore-based merchant in the early years of the same century, returning to Newark in 1812 to establish a gunpowder manufactory. The couple would both live long lives, eventually settling in New York City, with Lewis Atterbury dying in 1872 at the age of 94 and Catharine Atterbury following him in 1877 at the age of 95. (It is worth noting that the New-York Historical Society holds in its collection a sillhouette of Catharine Atterbury, donated by one of her descendants in 1942.) Mrs. Atterbury's jar is extremely notable as one of a small number of surviving items made by a mystery New York City area potter who produced what is among the very finest bodies of work of any of the period American stoneware potters. Based on the very distinctive incised decoration and identical handwriting, the same hand that produced this jar is that which made the iconic "Elizabeth Crane" punch bowl (with an 1811 date) in the collection of the American Folk Art Museum in Manhattan, NY, regarded as one of the finest examples of American stoneware in existence. This same potter likewise produced the wonderful "Henry Edoson" flask (with an 1804 date) in the Weitsman Collection at the New York State Museum in Albany. The largest jar by this potter known, it is a commanding, striking example, complementing pieces like the aforementioned punch bowl and flask as it also bears--in their manner--a prominent inscription for a person in the Newark, New Jersey, area and an early 1800's date. It is difficult to overstate the importance of this jar as both the product of a potter working at the very top of his craft, and as an object that absolutely exudes the history of the early republic, made for a woman whose family (including herself) interacted with Washington and played important roles in the establishment of the United States of America.

Condition: Heavy chipping to foot. Heavy chipping to one handle. A tiny chip to opposite handle. A smooth, 2.5" in-the-firing chip to rim. In-the-firing contact marks to one side. H 14.25”.

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019.

Price Realized: $5,900


EXTREMELY RARE SLIP-DECORATED LOAF DISH, Stamped "J. Mc CULLY," Joseph McCully, Trenton, NJ, circa 1800-1850, long, oval form with coggled edge, the interior profusely-decorated with six rows of yellow-slip swags. Reverse impressed with the maker's mark of early Trenton, New Jersey potter, Joseph McCully (1771-1857). Few signed examples of this potter's work have survived, this loaf dish being among the largest and most elaborately decorated.

Condition: Wear and a few glazed flakes to interior. Typical light wear to rim. L 16.75”.

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019.

Price Realized: $4,425


EXCEEDINGLY RARE AND IMPORTANT SMALL-SIZED STONEWARE JAR, with Iron-Oxide Decoration and Incised Federal Eagle Motif, Inscribed "LIBERTY", Baltimore, MD origin, circa 1795-1815, cylindrical jar with tooled shoulder and semi-rounded rim, decorated with a detailed incised design of a Federal eagle with shield across its chest, holding an American flag and an olive branch in its talons, as well as a long banner in its beak, inscribed, "LIBERTY." Jar is decorated in the English style with a dipped iron-oxide slip extending to the shoulder area. This style of decoration dates the jar to Baltimore's earliest years of stoneware production, prior to the employment of cobalt-oxide decoration. Dipped iron-oxide treatment, among Southern-made stonewares, is perhaps most well-known in the work of John Swann of nearby Alexandria, VA. Possible makers of this jar include Peter Perine or Thomas Morgan, both responsible for bringing the stoneware craft from Harford County, Maryland to Baltimore. Until now, a few important stoneware jars with incised or brushed-cobalt eagle motifs, which were made in Virginia's James River Valley during the late 1810's or 1820's, were considered the earliest representations of this purely-American image found on Southern-made stoneware. This jar's use of iron slip, however, strongly indicates an earlier period of manufacture. Its eagle design, including the wonderful inscription, "LIBERTY", within the banner and an American flag in the bird's talons, is among the most highly-developed seen on a ceramic object produced in the American South.

Condition: Surface wear to left side of jar's front and left side of jar. Otherwise excellent condition with minor base wear. Provenance: Recently discovered in Virginia. H 7.5”.

Sold at Crocker Farm October 26, 2019

Price Realized: $4,425


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